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Questions About Cloning from HDD to SSD


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#1 Torvald

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Posted 10 March 2016 - 12:26 PM

I would like to upgrade my current system (Windows 7, soon to be Windows 10) that has two HDDs to instead use a SSD for my system drive, while keeping the HDDs for storing data files.

 

Am currently gathering info on how to install and clone to the SSD myself, in order to save the cost of paying a computer tech to do the upgrade.  The process looks complicated, but hopefully with a little advice from BC folks, I'll be able to figure it out.

 

My first concern is as follows:  If I connect a blank SSD, then use software like Macrium Reflect free to clone my existing system HDD to the SSD, most instructions recommend disconnecting my old system HDD to prevent confusing Windows before I next boot the computer.  However, if I disconnect the old HDD, how will I ever be able to reformat it so that it can be used to store data?

 

Also, do I need to be concerned about whether or not my motherboard will support a SSD, or do all motherboards (even old ones) support using them?  For example, I've seen advice about changing the BIOs setting from IDE to AHCI before first booting to the SSD.  My BIOS has this option, but only under the RAID settings.  Will this be okay, or is this a problem?

 

 


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#2 Drillingmachine

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Posted 10 March 2016 - 12:55 PM

My first concern is as follows:  If I connect a blank SSD, then use software like Macrium Reflect free to clone my existing system HDD to the SSD, most instructions recommend disconnecting my old system HDD to prevent confusing Windows before I next boot the computer.  However, if I disconnect the old HDD, how will I ever be able to reformat it so that it can be used to store data?

 

Also, do I need to be concerned about whether or not my motherboard will support a SSD, or do all motherboards (even old ones) support using them?  For example, I've seen advice about changing the BIOs setting from IDE to AHCI before first booting to the SSD.  My BIOS has this option, but only under the RAID settings.  Will this be okay, or is this a problem?

 

 

 

Question 1: reconnect it after first boot.

 

Question 2: Motherboard manufacturer and model? AHCI is not mandatory.



#3 hamluis

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Posted 10 March 2016 - 05:50 PM

You don't have to disconnect it...but you do have to enter the BIOS and change the designated boot drive to the new one in the boot hierarchy.  Windows will detect the old drive (as it should) and the new drive (as it should) but it will only boot from the drive designated as the boot drive.

 

As long as the old drive is not reflected in the BIOS boot order, Windows cannot boot from it.

 

Louis



#4 Torvald

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Posted 10 March 2016 - 07:13 PM

Drillingmachine,

 

My motherboard is an MSI P43 NEO3, and the CPU is an Intel Core 2 Q8400 Quad Core 2.65 GHz.  

 

They're a bit old, as I built my system in 2008, but it still works great!

 

Hamluis,

 

Thanks for the info.  This upgrade process may turn out easier than I thought.


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#5 hamluis

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Posted 10 March 2016 - 09:19 PM

It's easy...as long as you remember what the goal is :).

 

Once you boot with the new drive as the boot drive and the old drive as mere storage, you can move files, delete files, delete the Windows folder on the old drive, format the old Windows partition and create a new one...whatever it is that you want to do.

 

Louis



#6 Drillingmachine

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 08:21 AM

Windows MAY write files needed for boot to something else than boot drive. So disconnecting every other than boot drive during Windows installation is highly recommended. That way other than boot drives can be safely removed and Windows will still boot.






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