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USING W10 LIKE W7


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#1 Jeffers613

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 05:49 AM

I don't really want to upgrade to W10 (very happy with w7!) but I realise that I will probably have to in due course - MS are pushing w10 very hard, although I have turned off automatic downloads for all recommended updates to avoid MS clandestinely automatically downloading w10 later this year.

My question is this.

I have read that if I upgrade to w10 I have the opportunity to uninstall it within a month and go back to w7.

Does this mean that I am still OPERATING w10 - but USING  it exactly like w7 - or, does it mean that I have jettisoned ie uninstalled w10 and am back with w7?

If the latter, then there will be a problem when MS stops supporting w7!

The ideal situation for me would be to KEEP OPERATING w10 (so that it continues to be supported) but be able to USE w10 just like w7. Is this possible?

Can I have some advice please! I'm not a techie so need advice in simple language!



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#2 rp88

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 07:02 AM

I believe that going back reverts your system to exactly as it was before, so yes window 7, not "windows 10 acting like windows 7". As for returning to one's old OS AFTER that 30 day perod is up, if one has system images made before the upgrade then you might still be able to revert many months, perhaps years, afetr upgrade. Whether this business with using system images to return to your old OS works with all windows versions, or only with those bought as software then installed by the user(rather than those preinstalled by manufacturers on devices which are sold), I am not sure.


System images, here's how to make one

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/create-system-image-in-windows-7-8/

Edited by rp88, 09 March 2016 - 07:02 AM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

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#3 Niweg

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 10:58 AM

 When you upgrade from 7 (or 8.1) to 10, what happens is that your old system is saved in a file called Windows.old.  If you decide to go back to 7, that file will be used to accomplish it.  If you wait past the 30 days however, MS will invalidate the license for 7 that you used for the update.  That means that even if you have a complete system backup, you won't be able to activate it if you restore from it.  Moral of the story, don't procrastinate during that 30 days!

 

 Good luck.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#4 Jeffers613

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 11:45 AM

Thanks. Although I want to use my computer in a W7 mode rather than in the new-fangled W10 mode, I can't see the point in upgrading to W10 and then (within 30 days) going back again to W7 - which sooner or later will be unsupported - and then I (and everybody else) will HAVE to upgrade to W10.

 

I have looked at other postings and these refer to something called 'Classic Shell' whereby (if I read them correctly) you upgrade to W10 but then have the option to use W10 in a mode that looks and feels much more like W7.

 

Can anyone give me more info on Classic Shell - does it 'look and feel' like W7 (although actually running in W10) and are there any downsides in opting for Classic Shell?



#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 12:00 PM

No experience with Windows 10 but I put Classic Shell on two Windows 8.1 computers. There are many many tweaks available so there is a learning curve. You can also accept the defaults and pick the Windows 7 shell. 

 

As a side note. Windows  8.1 took a lot of tweaks to get usability equal to Windows 7. Windows 10 may be different. Windows 8.1 is like Jekyll and Hyde. It doesn't know if it wants to be a tablet or desktop. 



#6 britechguy

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 12:13 PM

Windows 10 may be different. Windows 8.1 is like Jekyll and Hyde. It doesn't know if it wants to be a tablet or desktop.


Windows 10 is different. It really is a merger of what most of us hated seeing gone from prior versions of Windows when Win8/8.1 came out while retaining the good things (yes, there are some) about Win8/8.1.

And a big, "Amen!," on the "doesn't know if it wants to be a tablet or a desktop" observation. My partner's laptop is still Win8.1 and although I long ago learned how to deal with it I still hate virtually every choice Microsoft made with regard to how to handle things in that OS as a whole.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#7 Wolverine 7

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 03:18 PM

If you want win 10 to function something like win 7 on a desktop level then thats reasonaby easy to achieve.

 

Personally i disliked the 10 start menu,so i second the motion to use Classic Start menu,i use it on my 7 and 10,easy to use and very configurable,you can get the 10 menu back anytime with a click if you want it.

 

You can make Explorer look and work more like 7 with a bit of fiddling...if you do any of that be sure to create restore points and backup the registry.



#8 leithanne

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 04:47 PM

 When you upgrade from 7 (or 8.1) to 10, what happens is that your old system is saved in a file called Windows.old.  If you decide to go back to 7, that file will be used to accomplish it.  If you wait past the 30 days however, MS will invalidate the license for 7 that you used for the update.  That means that even if you have a complete system backup, you won't be able to activate it if you restore from it.  Moral of the story, don't procrastinate during that 30 days!

 

 Good luck.

 

 

Do you have a source for that? I was under the impression, and felt that Brink verified, that one could always return to the previous OS.



#9 Niweg

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Posted 10 March 2016 - 10:21 AM

leithanne  see the answers.microsoft.com forums on Windows 10.  It's in the FAQs there.

Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 March 2016 - 10:46 AM

I believe you can rollback. There were a lot of questions regarding this but if you roll back after 30 days you need to do a complete reinstall and use the key found using a keyfinder. It would not be a bad idea to backup your activation files with Advanced Token Manager or better yet create a complete disk image before doing the upgrade.

 

From HowtoGeeks

If you rollback your machine in that first month you get your entire old Windows installation back. If you rollback after the 30 days you aren’t as much rolling back anymore as you are just releasing your Windows 10 license and freeing up your old key to be used for your older version of Windows. You’ll still need to totally reinstall Windows and use your old key to get your old installation back up and running.

Now what’s interesting is that upgrading to Windows 10, even if you roll back to your previous version of Windows, secures you a permanent copy of Windows 10 linked to that license key. If you decide to upgrade two years from now, at least according to Microsoft at the time of this article, you’ll have a Windows 10 download waiting for you for free.

 



#11 leithanne

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Posted 10 March 2016 - 02:38 PM

This is the thread where we discussed re-installing a previous OS

 

This is the Ten Forums thread where Scoop asked Brink for clarification.

 

Sorry, Niweg, but I couldn't find anything on the MS Forums to support your position., But, then, I read only the first three pages. Perhaps you could provide a link?



#12 rp88

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Posted 10 March 2016 - 08:14 PM

Post #10, by a keyfinder you mean using something like belarc adviser to find out what your key is then write it down on paper? Does this only work for versions of windows 7/8.1 bought as discs and then installed onto an empty machine or is the same also valid for machines bought with windows pre-installed by the manufacturer? That therefore mens the list of things users would need is: system image (made with windows' internal image making tool or with a third party one)/manufacturer's recovery media, key wrtten down from running a key finder when in windows 10...anything else.
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#13 Niweg

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 03:32 PM

This is the thread where we discussed re-installing a previous OS

 

This is the Ten Forums thread where Scoop asked Brink for clarification.

 

Sorry, Niweg, but I couldn't find anything on the MS Forums to support your position., But, then, I read only the first three pages. Perhaps you could provide a link?

 If you're not interested enough to read the answers.microsoft.com forums, why do expect me to be?  I read all that stuff months ago, don't need reinvention of the wheel.  Sorry.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#14 leithanne

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 04:32 PM

I will assume that, unlike me, you are unable to provide a link.



#15 Niweg

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 04:46 PM

 I didn't bookmark it, but I told you where to find it.  It's been months since I saw it there, so I'd have to do exactly what you don't want to be bothered with doing.  It IS well documented in those forums but you have to be willing to read more than 3 pages to get to it.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.





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