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Starting new IT support position please help?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Robdiqulous

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 03:38 PM

Hello!

 

So I am starting a new position where I will be the IT support guy for a company of about 25 employees. They have a big router or switch not sure exactly and some other hardware like an wireless access point or something. I only got a glance at the stuff. My job will be to keep everything running smoothly and updating things when needed or fixing things if need be. They are not real sure just kinda getting it worked out as they go. 

 

Anyway,  I went to school for A+ and Net+ years ago and also went through some Microsoft classes. But that was years ago. I know what I am doing on my own computer and definitely more than an average person but I was looking for some tips or maybe some things that I should be doing in my first week to get a hang of the network or how everything is set up.

 

If anyone out there has any tips on what I should look for or how things should be set up or anything I would greatly appreciate it. This is my first IT position and I am going to be the one basically in charge of it. Everything is already set up but I just want to make sure everything keeps working and what not. SO any advise on what I should be doing on a daily basis maybe or keeping an eye out for would be great! Thank you for your help. I will know more once I start the job.

 

Rob



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 04:42 PM

  1. Don't change anything you don't understand, especially if it works.
  2. Check existing documentation (odds are there isn't much)
  3. Get organized, a place for everything and everything in its place.  It doesn't matter if you have what you need, if you can't find it.
  4. Document everything.  This will be a reference for you in the future and be an asset to your replacement.

Number one is the absolute most important thing.  There may be a reason for why something is configured the way that it is, you need to understand that reason before you decide to change things.

 

The goal in IT is to reduce Incidents (things that break) and increase Work Orders (requests).  When you're in a high Incident, low Work Order environment you're constantly fixing things and don't have time to maintain or improve the environment.  When you're in a high Work Order low Incident environment you have more time to maintain and improve what you have.



#3 Gorbulan

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 05:00 PM

My advice since I just started my second IT Support job:

 

Just be nice and a team player. It is more important that you support these people and work with them to achieve goals, than it is that you know everything. I am rather nervous like you at my new job. Sometimes they ask me stuff and I am like: "What the hell is a VPN?!" I can read a book about or Google VPNs, active directory, samba, etc. That's easy. Working with people and coming up with solutions to complicated problems can be hard, you won't find the answers after a simple Google search. Everything you will need to know you will learn along the way.

 

Oh, and as Kilroy said, documentation is your friend. If documentation does not exist, make it exist!



#4 vcolev

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 05:15 PM

Back up everything!!!!!!!!!

 

Make sure if you are going to change something you have it backed up or documented to where you can change it back if need be.



#5 Robdiqulous

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 05:51 PM

Thanks for the suggestions guys. Yeah I plan on just feeling it out and figuring stuff out along the way. I mean that is how most of us have probably learned most computer things right? :) I was just wondering if there are any things I should know and what not. But these are all really good points. Especially the back ups and documentation.

But I don't like your rule number one. How am I supposed to figure out what it is if I don't change it and break something!? /s haha

Any programs I should look into or get familiar with? Anything like that? To monitor the network or something? Lol See not even sure what to do on a day to day basis. But I want to make sure I do well!

Edited by Robdiqulous, 08 March 2016 - 05:51 PM.


#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 07:00 PM

 

How am I supposed to figure out what it is if I don't change it and break something!?

 

This is why you get paid the big bucks (!) as IT support - you do this sort of thing on the holiday weekends when nobody else is using it. But .. . !

 

1   Document it and any changes you propose to a fare thee well before you start, and,

 

2   You had damn well better have it working again by the tiime the staff come back on the Tuesday !

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 Gorbulan

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 07:22 PM

Any programs I should look into or get familiar with? Anything like that? To monitor the network or something? Lol See not even sure what to do on a day to day basis. But I want to make sure I do well!

 

People can recommend you this and that, but it does not matter. They do not know who/what you are supporting. Software is like tools, it changes depending on what you are fixing. 

 

 

But I want to make sure I do well!

 

 

With this attitude you will do quite well! 



#8 Robdiqulous

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 07:27 PM

Thanks for the help everyone. I will be starting Thursday. I am still open to any more tips and suggestions. I am guessing most of it will be figure it out when it happens type of stuff. Hopefully things go smooth for at least a while! :)


Edited by Robdiqulous, 08 March 2016 - 07:28 PM.


#9 Kilroy

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Posted 10 March 2016 - 07:59 AM

Ignore rule number 1 at your own peril   You don't want to be labeled as the FNG (F*cking New Guy).  IT is one of the greatest jobs, when done right.  You're better than Santa Claus.  You bring them new equipment and solve their problems.  If you're causing problems that is a quick way to be shown the door.

 

Expect to feel stupid for the first three months.  That is the time when you're going to be learning how they do things.  Even though I've been in the business for over 20 years I still have to learn the environment every time I start a new position.

 

Don't worry about what to do day to day.  First you need to learn how they used to do things.  Then you start implementing your new procedures.  Mainly you want to make sure any of your problem things are working, what those are will vary by site.  You want to make sure the important stuff is up and running, license servers, file servers, Internet, printers.

 

Licensing is another major thing to be aware.  Only install software that you are licensed.  Learn to read license agreements.  Free software on the Internet may be free for personal use, but not free for commercial use.  License violations can cost both you and your company.  If the company doesn't think licensing is a big deal check out BSA.org.






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