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Windows 10, SSD, 3 min boot time (welcome screen)


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#1 Bleecomp

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 04:26 AM

Hi, I really hope you guys can help me. I'm having a boot up problem and I've searched the net for help and tried different things; but I can't seem to fix the problem though.

 

I recently bought a new pc with Win 10 and the first month or so it booted up super quick (5 sec). Some weeks ago it started booting up much slower; it takes like 3 minutes to boot (I don't remember if this was after a Win update or not). I've got an Asus pc and it shows the Asus logo for about 2 Seconds, then the Windows account login screen comes up. I type my password and when I hit enter the welcome screen pops up like normal, the one with the dotted circle goin 'round and 'round, also showing the account name. The problem is that it stays like this for about 3 minutes!! :-( And I have an SSD disk!

When I finally come into Windows everything is fine.

 

Things I've tried:

turning off fast boot in Windows, restarting and then turning it on again

take out the usb stick for the Wireless mouse and then boot

set the Power option to high performance

I've tried to disable ULPS (set the value to 0 in the registry), but I couldn't find it - probably because I do not have AMD, i have Intel graphics

I've also used CCleaner to turn of start-up pgrogram i do not need

 

 

My system:

Asus R55L

Windows 10

Intel Core i5 5200U, 2,7ghz

Intel HD Graphics 5500

8 gb memory

1 x 128gb SSD (where Win 10 is and other installed programs - this disk has about 80gb free)

1 x 1TB disk (only files on this disk, has about 250gb free)



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#2 clayto

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 05:20 AM

I am not an expert but I can recommend the free / free trial program BootRacer which analyses and diagnoses your bootup speed, compares it with other users and so on. I used the free version and found it very informative, including the way it identifies different stages of the bootup process and their times.There are many sites offering information and  downloads on the internet, this is just one which should be safe:  

 

www.thewindowsclub.com/bootracer-review-download



#3 usasma

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 09:33 AM

What happened around the time that the boot got slow?

Do you have a System Restore point that you can restore to before the problem started?

Have you tried DISM/SFC?:

 

Then please run the following DISM commands to see if there's any problems with the system (from an elevated (Run as administrator) Command Prompt).  Press Enter after each one:

Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /ScanHealth
Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /CheckHealth
Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

FYI - I have repaired systems using the last command even though problems weren't found with the first 2 - so I suggest running them all.

From this article: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh824869.aspx

You can also run sfc.exe /scannow from an elevated (Run as administrator) Command Prompt to check for further corruption.

 

Have you tried a RESET using the Keep My Files option?

Have you tried a RESET using the Remove Everything option?  Make sure you backup your stuff before trying this!


My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#4 Niweg

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 10:44 AM

 If you've used a registry cleaner, that could be your problem.  They do no good and can cause problems that are difficult to diagnose, and extremely difficult to repair.  

 

 Good luck.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#5 Bleecomp

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 02:13 AM

Thank you for all the replies.

Since I've used CCleaner for registry cleanup, I decided to RESET Windows using the Keep My Files option. Now everything Works again.

Of course, I had to reinstall a couple of programs and adjust the layout of Windows to my liking again, but it was no hassle.

Just in case; I took backup of all my stuff, didn't need it though.

 

The first thing I did when Windows was reset was to dedicate Space on my disk for restore Points, and of course create a restore point.

 

Thanx again!



#6 usasma

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 05:16 AM

I'm glad that it worked for you.

System Restore is a neglected component of Windows.

Back in the old days it wasn't reliable - so not many people used it.

Now it's much more reliable and robust - so keeping Restore Points is a valuable resource to help with fixing systems.

 

Good luck!


My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#7 Bleecomp

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 06:24 AM

Yeah, about System Restore:

 

How much space is recommended to set aside for this? (the restore point I just created used about 150mb so it seems to me setting aside 1gb should be more than enough)

 

And I have 1 system disk/program disk/OS disk (SSD) and 1 disk with files only (music, movies, pictures); is it best to create restore Points on both disks? Or is maybe the system disk best to use for this?

(I'm asking because i have much more Space available on the file disk)



#8 Agouti

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 08:12 AM

I'd rather put my faith in regular backups that System Restore.  System Restore is only concerned with restoring the system, whereas with a backup image I can restore both my system and personal files.  On every system I have ever owned, I always turn off System Restore and implement a good backup plan instead.



#9 FreeBooter

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 09:43 AM

Your issue was cause by third party startup program or service next time perform Clean Boot state to troubleshoot Windows startup issues.

Edited by FreeBooter, 14 March 2016 - 11:30 AM.

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#10 Niweg

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 04:11 PM

 Good to hear you got your problem fixed.  As has been said above, there's no substitute for full system backups.  I turned System Restore on because I've almost always found it helpful, but there are too many things that nothing short of a full system backup is going to fix.  Do otherwise only if you don't care about losing your system.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#11 Havachat

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 12:46 AM

System Restore in my view with an SSD is useless and waste off space , Disabled. { Something most rely on and never works or just Fails }.

 

Boot Disc + Backups will always save you when needed , both for Operating System and Personal Files Partition.

Get an External Drive for All Backups ,  equal to or larger , for your needs....No More Headaches...just keep backing Up - Regulary. 

 

A lot of Programs for Backups / Cloning  are free and work well - Although i use Acronis TI and Mini Tool , and have never had issue when needed.


Edited by Havachat, 15 March 2016 - 12:48 AM.


#12 FergusonChris85

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 01:16 AM

I'm no pro but I had something similar to this happen to one of my employees computer. What I did was opened control panel - Hardware and sounds - Power options - system settings. If you scroll down the shutdown settings will have a check box for fast startup. If it is checked uncheck it and restart the computer then follow the same steps to enable it. The computer would literally take 2 -3 mins to boot. After doing this it would boot in 40 sec. This may or may not work for you.






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