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Computer running slowly, probably blunt trauma


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#1 Woogasnerk

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 01:34 PM

I accidentally knocked my computer over and it wouldn't boot up untill I jiggled some cords in the power supply. since then, it's been acting like it doesn't have enough processing power. My first suspicion was the power supply, but I tried switching it with my brother's and it still acts like my processing has been cut in half. When I check my task manager, it says I'm using a much higher percentage of my processing power than I should be. I have a 3.2 GHz Intel Pentium, but when I run Team Fortress 2, for which the stated system requirements are 1.7-3 GHz, it says I'm using 60% of my processing power on the menu screen and 80-90% while in a server. Is it possible that blunt trauma could lower the capacity of my processor without completely destroying it?



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#2 rqt

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 01:55 PM

When you knocked your PC over you may have dislodged your CPU heatsink, causing your CPU to slow itself down because of overheating. Remove the heatsink/fan assembly, clean up the CPU top & the heatsink base & refit the heatsink using new thermal compound. This may solve your problem.



#3 RolandJS

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 02:32 PM

Desktop, correct?  Have you already done the power supply, motherboard post test, then add back one item at a time?  Soon, you should be able to successfully post and successfully boot with all the hard-ware inside -- or -- you may discover a formerly-working item inside is either not working or only poorly working.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#4 Woogasnerk

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 02:52 PM

Hey, turns out that the cooling unit came off of my CPU. Sorry I took so long to reply, I was waiting for the thermal paste to get here to glue it back on before I started my computer again.



#5 RolandJS

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 08:35 AM

Still wouldn't hurt to do the step-by-step post and boot, to make sure the cpu was the only item temporarily damaged.  Sometimes, the damage is not readily visible to a normal "look-see."


Edited by RolandJS, 12 March 2016 - 08:36 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)





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