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Toshiba laptop won't boot after CMOS reset & main batt dis/reconnect


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#1 filonowst

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 07:30 PM

Hello all,

I installed an SSD in my brand new Satellite L55 C5256 and have a Windows ISO on a USB that I was going to install. Upon booting, I couldn't get into BIOS, rather immediately displayed upon hitting the power button was only something like "No bootable device found". So I thought, I'll reset the CMOS hoping it would reset the BIOS and let me in. So I opened it up, disconnected the main battery and the CMOS battery, waited a few minutes, held the power button for 30 seconds, and then put it back together and plugged it in to AC power. Now, I get no activity whatsoever when I hit the power button, no attempt to POST, no LED's, nothing.

 

I redid the entire process to make sure the connectors were seated properly and the BIOS memory was completely drained with the same results.

 

Attached is a shot with the connectors that I disconnected circled.

 

Any insight provided will be much appreciated.

Attached Files


Edited by filonowst, 06 March 2016 - 07:31 PM.


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 08:36 PM

Remove the power adapter. Pull the main battery connector but leave the CMOS battery connected. Hold the power button down for 30 seconds. Attach the power adapter but leave the main battery disconnected. Does the computer boot? 



#3 filonowst

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 08:59 PM

JohnC,

Nothing. It seems like the thing isn't getting any power at all, no LED's, nothing. And I don't understand because I did not go near the AC power supply system.

 

When I plug the power adapter in, I can here a faint very high pitched squeal coming from near the power button, which is on the opposite end of the case as the adapter socket. The squeal is probably standard operation, but it tells me power is getting at least over to the power switch if not beyond it.



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 09:31 PM

I don't know if it's a coincidence but a bad CMOS battery can prevent a laptop from booting. Do you have a multimeter to check the voltage of the disconnected CMOS battery? 



#5 filonowst

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 09:33 PM

No, but I'll track one down tomorrow.

 

If it were the CMOS battery, would you expect the machine to at least attempt to start up very briefly? This thing is as brick as a brick.



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 11:02 PM

On some laptops I have seen where a dead CMOS battery will not let the laptop start. I am not sure if this is your issue but it is worth a try. Your CMOS battery looks like a rechargable and not a regular CR2032 button battery. But, I tend to think this is not the issue as you say the computer is brand new. The CMOS battery symptom usually happens after a few years. 

 

Personally, I think something happened during the removal and replacement of the connectors.

 

Edit: Have you tried booting with the SSD or hard drive removed? 


Edited by JohnC_21, 06 March 2016 - 11:03 PM.


#7 filonowst

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 11:25 PM

I appreciate the assistance. I'll check the CMOS battery tomorrow. Although I practiced great care and nothing appeared to go awry, I wonder if something could have happened during the connector disconnection and reconnection. If the battery connector were to have been damaged, I would expect the AC power supply to still allow the computer to boot. If the CMOS connector were damaged, perhaps it would act as it is acting. The strange thing is that everything went fairly smoothly so unless it was very fragile to being with, I don't know when or where it would have happened.

 

One thing i was wondering about: the CMOS connector is directly above a "Windows button" that you can press when the case is installed. I'm guessing they are unrelated but the extreme proximity made me look twice. I'm still not sure what this Toshiba "Windows button" on the side of the case does.



#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 09:15 AM

These kind of problems are hard to diagnose over a forum but I can't understand why the computer does not respond with the adapter plugged in. That should work even if the main battery is disconnected. A bad CMOS connection could be a possibility but I am not sure how one would diagnose that. 

 

As I said before, I doubt the problem is a bad CMOS battery as the computer is so new. If the computer is under warranty then I would contact Toshiba support, not mentioning pulling the connectors.

 

Did the computer boot without the SSD or HDD installed?

 

Edit: I did a search on the Toshiba L55 and it seems there were many hits on the power switch itself available on Ebay and other sources. I would connection of the power switch. Are you talking about the key with the Windows logo between the function and alt keys?


Edited by JohnC_21, 07 March 2016 - 09:26 AM.


#9 filonowst

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 09:21 AM

Unfortunately, the computer at least POSTed after the SSD install but before I tried resetting the BIOS. When I powered on after the SSD install, immediately displayed upon hitting the power button was only something like "No bootable device found" with no chance to hit the escape keys to get into the BIOS, which is what led me to try to reset the BIOS.


Edited by filonowst, 07 March 2016 - 09:22 AM.


#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 09:36 AM

I am not sure if "resetting" the BIOS caused the problem but it's possible something happened to the UEFI firmware. If there was no operating system on the SSD then "No Bootable Device Found" would be a normal error message. When booting a Toshiba tapping F12 would give you a menu to select the boot device. Were you installing Windows 8 or higher on the computer? 

 

I edited my previous post regarding the Windows key and possible power switch connector. I think at this point your best option is to contact Toshiba Support.



#11 filonowst

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 10:04 AM

JohnC,

Your assistance is very much appreciated.

 

I had a Windows 7 on a flash drive I was trying to install, but I didn't get anywhere with that.

 

Regarding the Windows key, I am not talking about the Windows key on the keyboard. This is an actual standalone button on the side of the case next to the volume buttons. It has a Windows logo just like the keyboard Windows key. The instructions just call it a "Windows Button" with no explanation. I don't know why you'd need a button on the side of the computer to open a start menu or perform other Windows-keyboard-key functions; maybe it's a quick-access button for Cortana. Anyway, this button is located only a few millimeters underneath the CMOS connector so I noticed it, but I doubt it's related.

 

I'm going to call the PC shop that sold me the computer when they open this morning and see what they think.


Edited by filonowst, 07 March 2016 - 10:04 AM.


#12 JohnC_21

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 10:36 AM

If SecureBoot was enabled on the laptop, you would not have been able to boot the Windows 7 USB. That may be why you received the No Boot Device found. 

 

Please post back what the shop said. Thanks.



#13 filonowst

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 09:34 AM

After the expected admonishment, the shop took the laptop from me for a day. When he opened up the case, to his surprise, he found nothing out of order. He said it might just be DOA and he didn't want to pull the board because it could still be covered under warranty, so that is the route we are going. This makes me a little more confident that I may not have caused this. It was such a simple thing - gently wiggle the connectors out, hold power button, wait, then wiggle them back in...



#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 09:47 AM

Thanks for the update. Hopefully Toshiba will replace the computer with a new one. If Toshiba asks you to ship the computer and there is sensitive info on the drive you may want to pull it and attach it to another computer via a USB adapter. Move the data and then use CCleaner to wipe Free Space on the drive.






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