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CAT 5 Missing physical connection


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#1 juan-pensante

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 03:49 PM

I am struggling with a basic connectivity problem and I hope someone out there can give me new ideas.
 
I have laid 3 lines, 35 m each, of "Enhanced Net 5 UTP 4 Pair Solid Cable" from one floor/corner of the house to the other. The RJ45 connectors were successfully crimped and tested with a "Master CHL-468" tester.  I have followed he instruction on this page:
 
 
And my connectors are looking just like the picture above step 10 on that site. 
 
However, none of the 3 lines are working reliably.  By that I mean that only 1 out of 100 times I manage to get the orange led to lit indicating electrical connection established.  When it does, I am getting a reasonable 90 Mbits/sec (out of an ADSL connection capable of 300 Mbits/sec) of performance.
 
One of the tests I did was to join two of the runs with a female to female then test the full 70m with the CHL-468 and even that worked.
 
Right now, the only idea that occurs to me is that he modem does not have enough power to drive the signal across 35m of wire but I don't know how to test that theory.
 
Any further ideas you may have will be greatly appreciated.

 



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 07:08 AM

The CAT5 spec allows for runs of 100 meters, about 328 fee, so 35 meters of wire shouldn't be an issue.

 

Since the wire is solid you shouldn't be using crimps you should be using jacks.  Your problem will probably go away if you punch down the wire into jacks.  Alternatively purchase cables from Monoprice they are inexpensive, and work.  You can pick up a 50' CAT6 cable for $8, 75' for $10.25 and 100' for $13.50, well worth the money for a just works solution.



#3 juan-pensante

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 03:34 PM

For the benefit of anyone else facing the same issue, the problem boiled down to pairing.  Let me repeat what the network engineer who visited the house explained to me:  for lengths of cable greater than 15 m (even for CAT 5e) you need to use the following pairing:

 

orange/white - orange - green/white - blue - blue/white - green - brown/white - brown

 

As shown in of the one of the pictures on the following site:

 

http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/everything-you-need-to-know-about-ethernet-cables/

 

Once I re-crimped my connectors following that sequence I had a router looking like a Christmas tree with beautiful orange and green LEDs blinking.

 

This one is truly for network specialists as your regular software engineer would not know this one.



#4 Wand3r3r

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 05:25 PM

That is TIA 586B standard wiring.  There is also a TIA 586A which also works.

 

Looks like your first link giving an example of crimping is wrong.  Appears the guy has the solid green/white-green and blue/white blue in swapped positions which would be incorrect.

 

http://forum.benchmark.pl/topic/92433-pomoc-w-pod%C5%82onczeniu/


Edited by Wand3r3r, 09 March 2016 - 05:42 PM.


#5 Kilroy

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 07:39 PM

I don't recommend people crimping their own cables.  It is much less painful to purchase them.  As an IT professional the time required to crimp a cable costs more than the purchase price of a cable.  It is a skill to have, but not one that you will use very often.  Cables rarely go bad.



#6 Sneakycyber

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 08:09 PM

It takes me less then 2 minutes to strip and crimp a cat 5 cable, even at $35.00  (not reflective of my pay rate) an hour that cost 58 cents. On the other hand I always by pre-terminated PATCH cables. 


Chad Mockensturm 
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Certified CompTia Network +, A +

#7 juan-pensante

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Posted 11 March 2016 - 12:25 PM

Well, if you have to thread 3 cables through 20m of 18mm conduit with bends and all, I don't think there are many alternatives.  Besides, now that I have it all working and learned something new, I am really proud of the job.  Surely that must be worth something.



#8 Wand3r3r

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 12:01 PM

DIY projects are always rewarding



#9 Kilroy

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 12:12 PM

You would have had fewer issues if you terminated to jacks instead of crimping.  Jacks are much easier to work with, provided you terminate the same way on both ends.

 

I recommend running point to point and terminating to jacks and then running patch cables to equipment.  I've seen too many ends broken off or clips broken in my day.






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