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DISM


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#1 britechguy

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 10:46 AM

Hello All,

 

           I have not been able to find what I consider to be "good documentation" of the DISM command (and, yes, I've done multiple web searches).  The following (or very similar) has been posted on these forums multiple times, and by several different members with regard to DISM:

 

Then please run the following DISM commands to see if there's any problems with the system (from an elevated (Run as administrator) Command Prompt).  Press Enter after each one:

 

DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /ScanHealth

 

DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /CheckHealth

 

DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

FYI - I have repaired systems using the last command even though problems weren't found with the first 2 - so I suggest running them all.

 

I have actually run these all just to have been through it.  It seems to me, based on my own experience, that the "RestoreHealth" version is, for lack of a better term, comprehensive and obviates the need to do either of the first two.  If there's something amiss the RestoreHealth run will identify it and repair it if possible.  

 

It's been a couple of weeks, but if memory serves the degree of thoroughness in the DISM hierarchy seemed to be:

 

  1. CheckHealth - which by all appearances was a "quick scan" to identify if something might be obviously wrong
  2. ScanHealth - which appeared to be a "deep scan" to identify if something less obvious might be wrong
  3. RestoreHealth - which appeared to be a "deep scan" and repair function

I have not, however, been able to confirm my presumptions regarding the three switches due to sketchy documentation that is all I've been able to find.

 

If anyone knows of a really good web page or downloadable documentation for DISM would you please post the link(s)?

 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#2 Aura

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 10:53 AM

The TechNet documentation isn't good enough? :P

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-ca/library/hh824869.aspx
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-ca/library/hh825265.aspx

In my opinion, the home user only needs to use /RestoreHealth.

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#3 britechguy

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 12:17 PM

That second TechNet link won't load.  The same destination won't load if you click the DISM Operating System Package Servicing Command-Line Options link on the first page.

 

And, to be frank, no, that documentation is "documentation light."   I like to know more about exactly what each option examines, etc.  Based on the page that is loadable it sounds like /ScanHealth and /CheckHealth are only meaningful when used together and in that sequence.  If that's so, they should not have been implemented as separate command line switches since you really need the results of the second regardless of what path you intend to take afterwards (and it takes mere moments to run after a /ScanHealth has already been done).

 

But, I appreciate the pointers.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#4 Aura

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 12:24 PM

The second link works fine for me. Try it in Internet Explorer or Microsoft Edge. Sometimes, the redirection is missed up on other web browsers for Microsoft websites, go figure...

I think /CheckHealth and /ScanHealth are meant to be used on Windows images that haven't been deployed yet (so packaged). So from there, you'll know whether or not your image is healthy and if not, make adjustements if needed. The difference between Check and Scan in my understanding, is that Check verifies if a certain flag is present on the image or not (which would be set by a prior process which noticed that the image is damaged) and tell you if that image can be repaired or not, and Scan scans the whole image and ignore the flag that was set (if it was set).

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#5 britechguy

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 12:39 PM

Aura,

 

         Now, mere minutes later, that link is working in both Firefox and Chrome, and it had not been on multiple prior attempts.  I kept getting one of those infernal "internal server error" webpages.  My guess is that it really was a temporary internal server error.

 

         I agree, based on what I've read before now and at those pages that if you're trying to fix what you think is a wonky running system that the /Online and /RestoreHealth flags are the only version of DISM that you'd get any value out of using.

 

         Now to tease out what the differences are between SFC, which has been around forever, and DISM are.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#6 Aura

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 12:45 PM

On Windows 8+, you use DISM /RestoreHealth to get a CheckSUR output (which in Windows Vista and 7, you used SURT in order to get). SFC, DISM/SURT all return corrupt files, but at a certain level of difference. SFC is more likely to return corrupt payloads and manifests files, while DISM/SURT mostly focus on packages and manifests, but can also return payloads.

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#7 britechguy

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 12:57 PM

Aura,

 

        Now you're just speakin' Geek to me!!   Not that I couldn't learn Geek, but I've never delved that deeply under the hood.

 

        I guess my main question would be does running DISM remove the need to run SFC because, when necessary, it performs the same functions as SFC or is one wise to run a DISM followed by SFC or vice versa when a situation occurs where one suspects Windows system corruption?


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
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#8 Aura

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 01:00 PM

You usually want to run both SFC and DISM. It's possible that in a certain situation, SFC won't be able to repair a corrupt file because it cannot source it, but DISM will. I don't know how it does though, but this is something I would like to ask so I'll write it down and ask the appropriate people about it. Assuming that DISM doesn't use the same repair methods as SFC, it would be possible for DISM to not repair a file, but for SFC to because they use different methods.

I'll seek more information about this :)

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#9 britechguy

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 01:03 PM

I'll seek more information about this :)

 

Oh, noooooooooo!!!   My belief (clearly an illusion) that you were the font of eternal Windows knowledge that simply sprung from you, unbidden, is destroyed!!


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#10 Aura

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 01:04 PM

I never said that I knew everything about Windows :P I'm learning new things everyday when it comes to it.

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#11 britechguy

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 01:35 PM

I never said that I knew everything about Windows :P I'm learning new things everyday when it comes to it.

 

I never said you said it.  But myth is both comforting and wonderful at times.

 

At least the reality is that you know you don't know everything and I know I don't know everything and we're both of the "dig in and find out" frame of mind.  I wouldn't know probably more than half of what I know about any subject had I not been faced with an, "I don't know, and none of my easily available resources do, either," situation and decided I had to become the resource I'd wished I'd had.  It gives a warm glow of sorts when one finally succeeds in the individual missions.


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#12 dannyboy950

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 03:14 PM

Now if you really want to confuse things add chkdsc to the mix and stir. LOL see what you get then.


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#13 Aura

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 03:15 PM

Chkdsk is different from SFC and DISM. It doesn't do the same thing at all so it's not that bad.

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#14 dannyboy950

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 04:03 PM

To the untrained eye they seem to accomplish the same end result but by doing it differently for each one individually.

Perhaps that is part of our problem those with untrained eyes, we do not see the differences and understand what they do.

 

Thankfully we have a good group of well trained people here to help keep us on the straight and narrow.


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#15 Niweg

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 07:42 PM

 Chkdsk checks for bad sectors on your hard drive.  That's a HARDWARE function.  SFC and DISM check for SOFTWARE things like Windows system files that've somehow gotten corrupted.  Admittedly when strange things happen it's not always easy to tell which is causing a problem, although it's usually software, especially with computers that aren't so old.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.





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