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Linux ... You've Got to Love It!


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#1 wizardfromoz

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 02:13 AM

Went into one of my Distros – Linux Mint 17.3 “Rosa” MATE. Hadn't been there for a week, so used a script of mine to check
 

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

There was a new Update Manager to be installed, followed by a number of new items. A partial screenshot is provided below.
 

DaYTnek.png
 

There were 19 to upgrade, totalling 6MB, and additional space to be consumed was … 3KB. Sometimes you even make a savings (space freed).

Compare that to alternatives? 1st thing I thought was

“you've gotta love Linux”.

Now there are things you might dislike or hate about Linux … start another Topic? I'll be there, lol. Between love and hate there might be a few solutions you'll uncover (& me too!).

If you have your own “love” example – post it here.

Does not matter whether you are using Debian-based, RPM-based, Arch family, Gentoo family … whatever – tell us what you love. I also love the chameleon that is represented as a filament in an incandescent green light bulb in OpenSUSE Leap.

 

:wizardball: Wizard

 

Edited - typo in command box, thanks to NickAu


Edited by wizardfromoz, 01 March 2016 - 03:21 AM.


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#2 NickAu

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 02:53 AM

sudo apt-get update && sudo apr-get upgrade

The correct command is.

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

PS.

Whats the point of this? Is this just a fanboy post?


Edited by NickAu, 01 March 2016 - 02:55 AM.


#3 wizardfromoz

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 03:29 AM

@NickAu:

 

 

Whats the point of this? Is this just a fanboy post?

 

Haven't heard of a fanboy post, but can guess.

 

Last I heard, this section of the site is in favour of promoting Linux, either hand-in-hand with, or as an alternative to, other OSes.

 

If we can have topics describing our Linux adventures, experiences, and any number of others I could quote ... need I go on?

 

And as I said

 

 

Now there are things you might dislike or hate about Linux … start another Topic? I'll be there, lol. Between love and hate there might be a few solutions you'll uncover (& me too!).

 

Why not give it 24 - 72?

 

If there is no interest, it dies a natural death and moves in no time to page 10.

 

Cheers

 

:wizardball: Wizard

BTW - thanks for the tip on the typo, Nick. Now edited.



#4 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 08:15 PM

I really like using mount points rather than letter drives. Yes you can do that in Windows too, but it's so uncommon that some programs don't react well to it. I also love the fact that I don't have to worry about activating a license key. Most of all I just love how much choice there is in the Linux world.

 

One thing I do not love is the lack of an Adobe Fireworks alternative. Yes there are image editors availabe, plenty of them, but they are not suitable as a Fireworks replacement. At least in my opinion. Macromedia Fireworks does work well in Wine when I've tried it in the past. Adobe Fireworks does not, though some more experienced Wine users have had luck.



#5 wizardfromoz

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 02:56 AM

The bolded bit I could chant a Mantra to, ... om.

 

Took a look at Elementary OS the other day (live) and thought "Wow - that would go well on Elaine's old Compaq Presario C300 ... hell, might use it myself".

 

:wizardball: Wiz



#6 cat1092

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 05:52 AM

 

 

I also love the fact that I don't have to worry about activating a license key.

 

+1 to hollowface! :thumbup2:

 

That's one of many things I don't like about Windows, after so many activations (even through the Recovery partition), one will need to call the Activation Center. :angry:

 

Why should we have to prove, just because we reinstall for various reasons, that we have a Genuine version of Windows, especially coming straight from Recovery? 

 

Thanks goodness for Linus Torvalds, who along with his team, gave us an opportunity to get out of the rat race. We can install Linux to our heart's content, am looking at yet another reinstall to Linux Mint MATE 17.1, because I have 17 w/out a point release, and the upgrade choice is only 17.3, which I don't want (cpufreq isn't compatible with Haswell CPU's from 17.2 onwards). 

 

Hopefully as more disgruntled Windows 10 users faces reality, more will jump on our side. :)

 

And there's reason to hope for just that, because despite it's a no cost upgrade to 10, the tide is turning against the OS. Last month shows a dip in upgrades, which shows that consumers are reading the news, be it articles, their Facebook friends, wherever. We're speaking about up to a $200 OS if retail Pro version, it's free & consumers aren't wanting it. 

 

http://www.itworld.com/article/3039922/microsoft-windows/windows-10-growth-hits-the-brakes.html

 

So there's lots of hope on the horizon that there will be Linux growth. Really, the majority of computer users doesn't need nor use software such as hollowface mentioned (Adobe Fireworks), they just want to browse the Web, get the news, send & receive emails, use Skype, Linux does all of that and much more, totally free! :thumbup2:

 

People will line up like crazy if a burger or pizza joint were giving away or heavily discounting either for a promo period, and stand in line for an hour or longer to be waited on. With Linux, the only wait is the download, and in the case where one has to have Windows for proprietary software, that's fine & what dual booting is for. Or run Windows in a virtual machine to run their software as needed, as many doesn't prefer to dual boot, in fact, I have two Windows VM's on my Linux Mint install, one being a permanent license to Windows 10 Pro, gained by being an early Insider, in fact, ours were activated about 10 days to two weeks before those late to the party arrived. Yet they're only opened as needed, maybe once a month to update or assist others. 

 

I believe folks are beginning to see the light, and when they come here, we need to welcome them with open arms, and most importantly, don't knock them for what they're running, unless they ask, don't tell them to 'blow away' their installed OS w/out a Full disk backup, or reinstall media set (or reinstall DVD). We need to do our best to teach them how to use LInux & be free, and support them to the best of our abilities, keeping things as simple as possible. There are those here who are highly talented Linux users, yet we can't unload all of that on a newbie. Nurture, support, and gradually at their pace, show newbies the ropes, and over time, the rest will come. The majority will never be 'gurus', they'll just want a dependable OS that meets their needs & doesn't invade their privacy. 

 

If we pull together & do our part, our community will grow at a steady pace, as these newbies will spread the word, it's already happening. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 nailzuk

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 10:44 AM

lastimg.png
image sharing

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBuKLTHw9Gg

 

I have been using Archlinux now for around four years, and contrary to popular belief Archlinux does not break often due to it being bleeding edge and running the latest and greatest software out there, in my experience it’s quite the contrary, like most forty somethings i started my computing escapades in the late 80’s running BASIC on an old BBC micro, then ofc when windows 93 came around i became a ‘windows user’ right up until around 5 years ago, i found myself having to reinstall windows at least once per annum ( sometimes much more than once ) i got fed up doing this and spending maybe 40% of my computing time ‘scanning for and fighting with malware’ so like many other power users i ‘ditched Windows in favour of a proper UNIX like OS’ . I started off with PCLinuxOS which i found to be a great distro with an awesome welcoming community who taught me lots, back then i found KDE to be buggy and would break occasionally so when i felt confident enough i decided to shop around and attempt to find a linux distro that suited my needs.
After a year of distro hopping mostly amongst the ‘user friendly’ distros i found those kind of distros would often break after updates, also some tend not to trust the person sitting at the keyboard ( one or two don’t even give the user sudo by default ) this might be great for some but not for me, i’m a control freak as far as my OS is concerned, again i found myself having to re install more often that i would like..

I also have OS X Mavericks installed on this PC and i must say in my opinion it’s much better than Windows due to the fact it too is UNIX so it lets me run many of my favourite command line commands/programmes. Although in comparison to Archlinux i find it to be a tad clunky but it does have some superb applications, parallels springs to mind, if BSD or Linux wasn’t a thing i’d prolly use OS X as daily driver.

Enter Arch ( which has lived up to it’s name of being one of the strongest structures known to mankind )
After attempting to install Archlinux 2 or 3 times in Virtualbox i felt i was ready to install it on metal, the install is different from others wherein it’s not a graphical installer with buttons / progress bars etc. The install is all done from the console, it may look difficult to the novice but it’s really not. This is when i learned of standalone window managers and decided to forget about big complex full blown desktop environments like Gnome & KDE, i experimented with window managers and i was amazed by how small ( some only 2 meg ) configurable, and simple (not to mention blazing fast) they were, i used openbox for the first year, during which time i became aware of tiling window managers, the rest as they say is history. I soon became the stereotypical Arch user, with my tmux sessions, dotfiles and obligitory tiling WM.
Of course this method of computing is not for everyone, Arch or even linux in general is geared towards enthusiasts and power users, the masses don’t seem to care that the software they use on a daily basis runs code that keeps tabs on them, the recent hoopla with Volkswagen shows what kind of sculduggery goes in ‘proprietary’ code, sadly it’s often geared towards the advantage of the programmer, or the company who pays the programmer, the users needs and desires are secondary, anyways i didn’t mean to go into RMS mode, just thought i’d mention.
Archlinux has lasted longer on /dev/sdX than any other OS i have used (and i’ve used a few) in all those years i had only one issue where the proprietary nvidia driver got updated and xorg did not ( well not until a few hours later ) i was left without a graphical environment ( which was actually a learning experience which stood me in good stead as i now run a headless server on a raspberry pi) however at the time i was in panic mode without my GUI, as i do not game i have since purged the nvidia blob in favour of the open source GPU driver which has given me zero issues.
Currently my main box hex boots ( have i coined a new term ? ) it has 6 internal drives with the six OS on seperate HDD’s (Windows10, OSX Mavericks, FreeBSD, Arch i686, Arch X86_64 and another Arch on a wee 16GB Sandisk Cruzer Blade thumbdrive which runs Arch Testing Repo’s ( i don’t code so this is how i try & give back to the community) whilst on the subject of the Archlinux community i’d like to take this opperchancity to dispel those accusations that archers are elitist, mean and unhelpful (being told to read the wiki or a manpage does not equate to elitism) it’s how things are done over in Archland, teach a man to fish and all that, spoon-feeding newbs does not happen, personally i think those sort of claims and accusations stem from inexperienced Manjaro users and their ilk.
heres a couple of tips i would give to any Linux users
1. Don’t use proprietary graphics drivers unless you game or use the computer for other GPU intensive tasks, the open source drivers have gotten much better over the past few years and are very capable. The proprietary drivers often cause problems.
2. Don’t use a session manager like lightdm, slim, GDM, KDM etc. Login via TTY and start x with the ‘startx’ command. I have found these login managers to be troublesome. It’s really simple to login via above method and to choose DE or WM using ~/.xinitrc
3. Experiment!  try new DE’s WM’s don’t settle for the most common ones just because they are just that. WM’s will cause less problems and are often much faster. I guarantee if you try all available WM’s be it tiling or floating you will find one that suits your needs better than the common DE’s. There’s no excuse, WM’s like DWM require zero configuration and are ready to go out of the box.


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#8 wizardfromoz

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 04:21 PM

@nailzuk:

 

What an interesting post  ... thank you ever so much for the input, the screenshot and the video. :thumbsup:

 

I would say :welcome: ... but I see you have been a Member since 2009. Hope to see more of you around.

 

The six drives would account for that 1,388.6 GB figure in your profile, I was wondering.

 

I am recently a Manjaro initiate, using 15.12 Xfce version, but it is only one of 15 or so Distros I keep and maintain (experiment, as you say). I plan on trying pure Arch SOMEtime this year, I hope, when time permits to pay it serious attention. If so, I may be picking your brains - in Forum, of course?

 

I would be hypocritical in the extreme to bag Windows users, when I used it for nearly 25 years. Nor do I pursue an agenda to encourage others to blow away Windows as I have done, if they have favourite apps (friend hollowface provided an example) that Linux has not (yet) accommodated with a satisfactory alternative.

 

I celebrate two years with the firm (BC) in May, and during that time, although not statistically corroborated, I am convinced there is an exponential growth in new Linux users, which I find quite thrilling. I endorse and applaud fora such as BC, which in my case certainly fed my desire to seek out and explore brand new (to me) worlds ... yes, I am a Trekkie as well.

 

@cat1092:

 

:thumbup2: as always for the input. Ditto to hollowface.

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#9 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 09:59 PM

You know what I love- a lack of malware. Once in a blue moon I think of some small thing I'm missing from linux, and then I remember trying for hours to get a Windows machine clear of malware. Today I had to disinfect a win8 tablet and somehow the person got so much on there that the malwarebytes scan had found 2023 objects. Search engines were redirected, windows opened randomly and the browsers were hijacked. That poor tablet was underpowered for windows, was very finnicky with its 1gb of ram, 30Gb of storage and atom processor. Everything ran at 100% with only a few programs open and I thought "what a great ubuntu tablet this would make".

I love not having to have an anti-malware, anti-rootkit, cleaner, uninstaller, anti-virus and all that junk.

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#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 10:09 PM

What I love,

 

No registry

 

The ability to put the home directory on a separate partition making a reinstall easy.

 

Being able to mount a partition in linux that fails on Windows.

 

ddrescue

 

Plus everything already posted. 



#11 66Batmobile

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 10:48 PM

Just the overall ability to customize at will, and also:

 

No registry

 

A big AMEN to that one! :bowdown: :bowdown: :bowdown:


Whatever it was...I didn't do it!


#12 cat1092

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Posted 03 March 2016 - 05:00 AM

What I love,

 

No registry

 

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

The Windows Registry is a place that's not troublesome in itself, rather it's an area where con artists tries to sell consumers that a 'cleaning' is needed every now & then, yet once they have your cash & your system (or part of it) has been torched, that's where trouble comes in. The odd thing about the registry cleaning industry being, there's no standard. What one outfit says needs cleaning, another will point out an entire different list, until there's none left. 

 

Plus it's a well known place for nasty Malware, including those lethal 'crypto' or ransomware type of infections, to sneakily & rapidly take over the system. Steve Ballmer many times alluded to Linux as a 'cancer', apparently he wasn't thinking about that part of his own creation. 

 

Thank goodness that Linus Torvalds & his team decided that we don't need this on our Linux systems. :thumbup2:

 

nailzuk, though you've been a member since 2009 & this made your second post since joining,  :welcome: to our Linux Forum at Bleeping Computer! :)

We're happy to have you here and you've provided your unique insight. kind of like a breeze of fresh air. Regardless of distro you run, you're very welcome to participate on our site & we very much look forward to hearing from you again, hopefully in the near future. There are other members here who runs a variety of Linux OS's, as you'll see on the main page. While I've been happily running Linux MInt for what will not be long 7 years, at the same time, also see the larger picture, Linux is about choice. 

 

So feel free to make yourself at home. :)

 

 

 

The ability to put the home directory on a separate partition making a reinstall easy.

 

Oh how beautiful that is, and it's totally different from a separate Data partition on Windows, where one stores their personal files, which is a great idea. Yet it's not the same as having to reinstall the Linux root partition, and upon installing one's apps & software, the configuration is just like one left off. Part of proof is that apps pinned to the panel will return as they're reinstalled, or if one that's included in the default install, will magically reappear. 

 

Sometimes, a reinstall of the root partition becomes necessary, by choosing /home & Swap partitions, yet not checking the 'Format' box on /home, all of one's personal files will be there. One of the other benefits of having a separate /home partition, is that one can install root to a fast SSD, and use as much space as needed on a HDD in the system for /home & Swap. It's highly beneficial to those who runs virtual machines. Another added benefit of this, if the drive holding the root partition fails (& all drives do at some point), then /home is safe. Just be sure to image that /home partition every now & then, and if space allows, send each of the main folders, which by default will include subfolders, to another drive from time to time as changes are made. 

 

That's what I do before a clean install, though it's yet another good way to make copies of data, and these can be transferred to a backup drive with NTFS formatting. Just make sure that defrag is not enabled for that drive or partition where the files are stored. The Linux OS does a great job of tidying itself, no defrag needed. I believe that it was hollowface who showed us the trick to determine fragmentation on a Linux OS sometime back, and when everyone posted their results, it was amazing. :guitar:

 

Keep the support for Linux going! :bounce:

 

Cat


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#13 Gary R

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Posted 03 March 2016 - 07:52 AM

I like the fact that you can try out the Linux distro of your choice before you install it, and that the same USB disk you use for the trial, can afterwards be used to troubleshoot your install (or install it afresh in pretty quick time) if you ever have problems with it.



#14 MadmanRB

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Posted 03 March 2016 - 12:38 PM

I really love the tweakability of linux, the amounts of customization is outstanding


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

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#15 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 03 March 2016 - 01:09 PM

What I love,

 

No registry

 

The ability to put the home directory on a separate partition making a reinstall easy.

 

Being able to mount a partition in linux that fails on Windows.

 

ddrescue

 

Plus everything already posted. 

 

 

Having a separate partition for your home directory has been an integral part of Windows at least since Windows XP. You can direct your default home partition anywhere you want in Windows and the C drive (partition) really only holds the programs itself. All downloads and data are directed to what ever partition or drive that you want them to go. I always use an external hard drive as my home partition for Windows.


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