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Switched from Avast to BitDefender - Am I making a wise Win10/64 choice?


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#1 tallship.

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 02:57 AM

On a new Win10/64 install, I reluctantly opted for BitDefender over that of Avast. Here's what I used to do, and hopefully the community can guide me towards a sane, effective, and moving forward even a proactive Modus Operandi for shorting up and securing WinX/64 installs....

 

Before, this is what I would do:

 

Install OS

install Avast Free edition of their AV

Install SAS (SuperAntiSpyware) and license it (Great deal, especially for server installs)

Install MBAM (MalwareBytes) and license it (Always awesome IMNSHO)

 

And that would pretty much cover my antivirus/antimalware protection for a windows box.

 

Moving along now....

 

Windows 10/64 on a new PC. I chose to rate all the AV apps again and was torn between BitDefender and Trend Micro - I still like Avast, but they rank much lower this year, and if you have a problem with that please do indeed let me know and why too - coz I like the Free Avast AV app!

 

So next I install BitDefender Internet on a free trial (It's definitely different than Avast).

 

1.) Should I bother with installing SAS or MBAM, now that Defender has been sufficiently disabled, along with Windows firewall?

 

2.) My notifications are still nagging me to turn on "Windows Smartscreen"... WTF? Should I just let this go and ignore it, install MBAM and SAS, enable Windows Smartscreen, huh?

 

I'm interested in EVERYONE's input, suggestions, and recommendations - I'm preparing to deploy a lot of boxes and I want to feel good about the specs I demand from the deployment team I'm hiring for this project.

 

I know there's a lot of good and bad, but I don't want to cook a chicken in and oven that is inside a microwave, so to speak, I just want lean, mean, performance machine that is about as safe as I can make it before releasing them to the user production environment.

 

So, just BitDefender w/smartscan and defender disabled, or add MBAM and SAS too? Or even other recommendations - I need some sort of baseline from which I can make informed decisions.

 

I'm looking forward to your responses and thank you so kindly in advance for your comments, opinions, and recommendations in this matter.

 

Heck, I don't even know  what MS smartscreen really is - sounds like a data aggregation scheme whereby they can share demographics with faceplant!

 

Kindest regards,

 

 

Bradley

 

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Edited by Chris Cosgrove, 29 February 2016 - 07:09 PM.
Moved from Win 10 to 'Anti-virus, anti-malware and privacy'.


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#2 usasma

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 07:34 AM

I also post over at the MalwareBytes BSOD forums.
I have recently found a number of problems between BitDefender (mostly the 2016 version) and MalwareBytes (when it's running in memory).

IMO, to have the best of both worlds, don't let MalwareBytes load with Windows - just run it "on demand"

 

As for SmartScreen - I'd turn it off for myself

BUT, you're doing away with that extra bit of protection.

It's merely an online screening program for executables - it gives warning if they're not well-known, or if they're not trusted

 

IMO there's 3 ways to go:

- no protection at all (risky, but fastest)

- Windows Defender/Windows firewall (less risky, but still fairly fast)

- 3rd party protection (less risky, but the more you add the slower it's going to get)

 

You have to consider the user and their history when making these choices.

I know those who don't use protection and rarely (if ever) get infected.

And I know those who have all the latest security stuff - and they get infected easily.


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#3 quietman7

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 08:13 AM

You need both an anti-virus and an anti-malware solution with real-time protection for maximum protection.

An anti-virus program alone does not provide comprehensive protection and cannot prevent, detect and remove all threats at any given time. Anti-virus software is inherently reactive...meaning it usually finds malware after a computer has been infected. Anti-virus and anti-malware programs each perform different tasks as it relates to computer security and threat detection. Essentially, they look for and remove different types of malicious threats.

In simplistic terms, Anti-virus programs use massive databases with different scanning engines and detection methods to scan for infectious malware which includes viruses, worms, Trojans, rootkis and bots.

Anti-malware programs use smaller databases and generally tend to focus more on adware, spyware, unwanted toolbars, browser hijackers, potentially unwanted programs and potentially unsafe applications.

Anti-virus and Anti-malware solutions with anti-exploitation features protect against zero-day malware, drive-by downloads, exploits and Exploit Kits.

However, there can be some overlap in functionality and detection features depending on the program's scanning engine, how the vendor defines a specific threat and what Naming Standards are used. Anti-virus software is inherently reactive...meaning it usually finds malware after a computer has been infected. The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear and it takes time for them to be reported, samples collected, analyzed, and tested by anti-virus/anti-malware researchers before they can add a new threat to database definitions. Further, if you're dealing with zero-day malware it's unlikely the anti-virus is going to detect anything.

Please read Supplementing your Anti-Virus Program with Anti-Malware Tools
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#4 garioch7

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 12:59 PM

Just my two cents to add to what Quietman7 has stated.  I have used Bitdefender for several years, along with MBAM Premium and MBAE (Anti-Exploit) Premium on several computers.  As suggested in the MBAM Forums, I have configured exceptions in both Bitdefender and MBAM to exclude each other.

 

I have not had any issues with the apps all playing nicely together in the same sandbox.

 

For sure, you are well advised by Quietman7 to complement your anti-virus application with robust anti-malware and anti-exploit apps that have real-time protection.  Much better to stop malware from becoming embedded in your system and then trying to clean it out when it is "discovered" by a manual scan.

 

It is important to add that Bleeping Computer does not recommend a specific anti-malware combination of applications.  There are many good products out there (and some bad ones too).  The choice is yours as to which products best meet your needs and your budget and that you are comfortable using.

 

Have a great day.

 

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#5 neuronic

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 09:07 PM

Hi everyone. New guy here. 

 

I'm moving away from managing system security for myself and opting more for managed security services. I like the idea that security pros are monitoring my software and backups. It isn't much of a monthly costs when you consider what they offer and what you get to forget about. 

 

But if I had to sit down and design a solution. I would use layers to make it work. Lock down admin access, Antivirus (Bit defender powered), Web protection, patch management ,vulnerability identification and cloud backup and recovery of important files. 

 

That's my two cents :) 



#6 quietman7

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 09:17 PM

:welcome: to Bleeping Computer.

Yes...Security is all about layers and not depending on any one solution, technology or approach to detect and prevent the latest threats. Thus, a multi-layered defense using an anti-malware and anti-exploit solution to supplement your anti-virus combined with common sense and following Best Practices for Safe Computing provides the most complete protection.

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#7 neuronic

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 07:48 PM

:welcome: to Bleeping Computer.

Yes...Security is all about layers and not depending on any one solution, technology or approach to detect and prevent the latest threats. Thus, a multi-layered defense using an anti-malware and anti-exploit solution to supplement your anti-virus combined with common sense and following Best Practices for Safe Computing provides the most complete protection.

.

 

I totally agree, I just feel like I do enough worrying about other peoples computers that I don't want to worry about my own so much. lol! 

I'm content passing that task off to someone that actually wants to do it. haha



#8 quietman7

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 07:51 PM

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