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Can't Dual Boot Two Installations of Windows 7?


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#1 susanrs

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 06:39 PM

Hi, everyone -

 

I recently removed a SATA hard drive from a slow PC I'm retiring and installed it in a faster PC. This faster PC is running Windows 7 home premium. The hard drive from the old PC is also running Windows 7 home premium. I have licenses for both.

 

Everything is operating fine. Both hard drives are detected when I boot into either. The thing is, I don't get a boot option menu when first turning on the machine.

 

So, when I want to boot into the other Windows 7 installation (which has different programs and files on it), I have to F10 into the BIOS, change the boot order of the drives, then restart. It's driving me a little crazy.

 

When I go to Startup and Recovery in the Advanced System options, I have only one operating system listed in the System Startup menu - Windows 7. However, it shows only one Windows 7.

 

I figure I probably need to manually add the newly installed drive to the boot manager via bcdedit. However, all the instructions I've found so far seem related to either 1.) adding a different OS… or 2.) adding a new boot option when it's on a partition of the same drive.

 

I'm trying to do it for a separate, newly added hard drive. Plus, my drive letters are different depending on which OS I'm booted into.

 

When I'm booted into the original Windows 7 OS (named ENT), this is how my drive letters look:

 

ENT (C:)

FACTORY_IMAGE (D:)

MEDIA (E:) - this is a partition

SYSTEM (G:)

VOY (H:)

FACTORY_IMAGE (I:)

 

When I'm booted into the second Windows 7 OS (named VOY - and the hard drive I just added to the machine) this is how my drive letters look:

 

VOY (C:)

FACTORY_IMAGE (D:)

SYSTEM (E:)

MEDIA (F:)

ENT (G:)

FACTORY_IMAGE (H:)

 

If I'm booted into the original Windows 7 OS (ENT), what commands and/or lines of code would I enter to add the second Windows 7 OS (VOY) to the boot manager?

 

Thanks in advance, and I apologize for being so... dense!



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 07:19 PM

Easy BCD is the answer I would pursue.  Link , I suggest you not click any of the buttons which will install something other than what you want.

 

Louis



#3 susanrs

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 08:04 PM

Great. Thanks very much, Louis! I'll give it a try.






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