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Raspberri Pi 2: NOOBS card corrupted?


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#1 CaveStoryKing64

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 02:10 AM

Well, I didn't get much attention on the Raspi forums, so I decided to dump it here.

I don't really know if this belongs here, but most of the NOOBS OS's are Linux distros, so...

correct me if I'm wrong!
 

So, I was setting up my Raspberry Pi 2 that I had received from element 14. A while later, I was dumb and started messing around, not knowing what I was doing, and seriously overclocked the system. Like, wayyyy too much. Anyway, I then turned it off via the adapter. About an hour later, I wanted to use it again, so I looked at the monitor. It was on HDMI, but said No Signal. I knew I probably screwed it up by overclocking it, so I decided to just uninstall and reinstall NOOBS. However, I couldn't. the microSD was much more corrupted than I expected. This is what happened upon inserting it into my PC.

{C}http://imgur.com/a/wKHzI{C}

The format bar got to about 75% before saying that it couldn't complete. Also, I know that the microSD isn't full, as it is a 32 GB microSD. And yes, I used the formatting tool from the SD foundation, it didn't work either. (full erase and size adjustment to on and the SD switch was flipped up)

Any help would be appreciated!

icon_e_smile.gif

 

 



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#2 raw

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 10:47 AM

Please tell me how you

 

seriously overclocked the system. Like, wayyyy too much

 

The Pi should still boot without the SD card (at least to the boot menu)

Holding 'Shift' down during boot should bring up the recovery menu.


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#3 CaveStoryKing64

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 12:43 AM

Please tell me how you

 

seriously overclocked the system. Like, wayyyy too much

I think I did something in the settings where it said how fast the CPU could go. It had a number, and I just held down the mouse on the up symbol.

 

 

The Pi should still boot without the SD card (at least to the boot menu)

Holding 'Shift' down during boot should bring up the recovery menu.

Even without an SD card, the monitor says No Signal. It is plugged in properly, is on the HDMI source, and both the monitor and raspi are being powered properly.



#4 cat1092

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 06:01 AM

 

 

I think I did something in the settings where it said how fast the CPU could go. It had a number, and I just held down the mouse on the up symbol.

 

Never have heard before of anyone attempting to OC a Raspberry PI, yet there's a first for everything. :P

 

I'm not that much into OC'ing, preferring to purchase faster/more powerful components instead for more native power, but have toyed with it a bit on graphic cards. Using either EVGA Precision X or MSI Afterburner for nVidia cards, and AMD's AOD for those models. When OC'ing, one must take it easy, bumping up just a notch or two at a time, in the case of the Raspberry PI, just one notch, reboot and see how it goes. Actually this applies to any type of OC'ing, going from stock values to the top of the scale (which may not be accurate) can lead to lethal results for the hardware. When you held down the mouse on the up symbol, the number you see doesn't mean it's the safest it can run, rather a general number (depending on the software used), and showing the current (stock) settings when beginning. 

 

While the Raspberry PI is gaining in popularity & becoming an enthusiast's toy, as far as computers goes, for it's size & to pack in all it can do, is amazing as is. Thankfully, shouldn't be a huge economic loss, though if you were to do several in this manner, it would be, or to apply the above method of OC'ing to an expensive computer could end in an expensive disaster. I've personally seen the damage OC'ing can do & have respect (mixed in with some fear) for these tools. That's also why one should always perform a check to see what other enthusiasts are calling 'safe' numbers for a given device before diving in. While I'll admit to my limited use of these tools, at the same time, will do my homework first. For example, just one notch with the mouse click can make all of the difference between a steady running, safe OC, and one that'll cause BSOD's. Back off a notch & you'll likely be stable as possible. Some operations requires the adjustment of voltages, this is way past my point of expertise & at that point would set everything back to default. 

 

If I were to do this with my GPU's, going to the top number & ran a benchmarking tool (such as Heaven's Benchmark), it wouldn't make it through the series.  Probably would be fried & possible damage to the MB also, since the GPU is connected directly to it, and possibly other components. Since the SD card was connected to your device, there's always the possibility that damage could have been caused, as it should format to out of the package capacity, regardless of good or corrupted file system. All that the format does is destruct the data, not repairing a possibly partially defective component. Of course, there's always the chance that the SD card were already gone bad to some degree, though if it would boot prior to the massive OC, seems like the OC could render part of it bad. 

 

Good Luck with these type of operations in the future, if you have further questions, feel free to ask. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 raw

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 07:58 AM

Tell me what your LED lights are doing when you power up.


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#6 CaveStoryKing64

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 01:41 PM

Tell me what your LED lights are doing when you power up.


https://www.dropbox.com/s/ishlv5njzz8z15t/Photo%202-28-28%20H%2C%201%2042%2055%20PM.jpg?dl=0

Edited by CaveStoryKing64, 28 February 2016 - 01:49 PM.


#7 raw

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 06:19 PM

it's not reading the boot code. was that your existing SD card or did you get it pre-installed?

Kingston and Adata have known issues. Let me know the brand, size and class of card.

(unless it was pre-installed in which case it could be bad, but meets their guide lines)


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#8 CaveStoryKing64

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 06:24 PM

it's not reading the boot code. was that your existing SD card or did you get it pre-installed?

Kingston and Adata have known issues. Let me know the brand, size and class of card.

(unless it was pre-installed in which case it could be bad, but meets their guide lines)

It was an existing SD card that I had purchased right after getting the raspi.

 

Brand: SanDisk

Size: 32 GB

Class: UHS Class 1


Edited by CaveStoryKing64, 28 February 2016 - 06:41 PM.


#9 cat1092

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 03:31 AM

Wow, am surprised that it shows anything after that OC attempt! :thumbup2:

 

Maybe a new SDHC card will be the answer, many of the 32GiB versions are available on promo at the Newegg site, if you're signed up for promos. The last two 32GiB SDHC cards that I purchased were UHS-1 (Class 10), and were under $15, and have a Pro model of the Samsung that came from Amazon (their typo, my gain), for a little over $16. Though it took two weeks for me to get that one, that was a $12 underprice typo at the time. The EVO line sold for around $15-16 of the 32GiB capacity, had actually purchased it, and after 4 days & not shipped, seen the unreal price of the Pro model, cancelled the prior order & purchased it instead. 90MB/s reads & 80MB/s writes were 2x faster than the EVO line. 

 

As to the OC ordeal, apparently the device has inbuilt protection & shut down rather than fry itself. :)

 

I'd suggest to go with a faster SDHC card (read the reviews before pulling the trigger) than any OC software in the Raspberry PI computer. Some of these 'UHS1' cards performs more like that of a lower class & RMA's are high. SanDisk normally builds good cards, though watch out, they do have some 'budget' units (applies to their SSD's also). The Raspberry PI is powerful & modern enough when the size & price of the device are figured in, probably more so than some of the very old computers we see here, it's owners desperate to find a way to run a modern Linux OS, and many has to settle for less. 

 

Hopefully with a new SDHC card, all will work out. :)

 

Good Luck!

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 29 February 2016 - 03:31 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 raw

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 08:35 PM

Overclocking and under voltage are the two main culprits when dealing with a corrupt card.

Although they claim to have fixed the OC problem doesn't mean it can't break.

At this point i suggest a new SD card and ease up on the throttle.  :thumbup2:


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#11 CaveStoryKing64

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 09:43 PM

Overclocking and under voltage are the two main culprits when dealing with a corrupt card.

Although they claim to have fixed the OC problem doesn't mean it can't break.

At this point i suggest a new SD card and ease up on the throttle.  :thumbup2:

Lol, I don't even need to overclock. I was just doing random stuff to be honest. Well, thanks for you guys' help. I just have one more question - "it's not reading the boot code." - What does that mean? I didn't have the SD card in at that time, so shouldn't it not have anything to do with that? Forgive me if I sound foolish, I'm a Raspberry newb.



#12 cat1092

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Posted 03 March 2016 - 05:08 AM

Not being a Raspberry expert, yet at the same time realize that any computer needs some type of storage to boot from, maybe the error was shown because there was no boot code to read. That would be no different than removing or unplugging the data cable from the drives in a notebook or desktop PC. 

 

That's my opinion on the matter. :)

 

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#13 raw

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 07:54 PM

You are correct, if the card is not installed it will not read the boot code,

same as booting from a corrupt card.


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#14 CaveStoryKing64

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Posted 07 March 2016 - 09:01 PM

You are correct, if the card is not installed it will not read the boot code,

same as booting from a corrupt card.

Oh, I was confused, because you said this as well:

 

 

The Pi should still boot without the SD card (at least to the boot menu)

Holding 'Shift' down during boot should bring up the recovery menu.

Since you said this, I took out the SD card. That may be why it isn't reading he boot code. I assume you mean something else, so can you please clarify?

 

Thanks :)



#15 raw

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 01:30 AM

that was my mistake, the 'hold shift for recovery' is with the card IN.

sorry for the confusion.


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