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HP Pavillion a220n


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#1 1930

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 06:10 PM

Hello, I have had the above mentioned computer since new and I could not be happier with it, so happy with it that I purchased a second one that I use at my place of business. I am not interested in purchasing a newer model computer nor upgrading if that would mean changing drastically the characteristics of my machine.

 

Unfortunately recently I have been having some issues with one of them, I have had to replace the hard drive in one of the units and since doing that I am having a second issue of the monitor freezing up with various colors and lines throughout and the mouse freezing within that frozen screen if that makes any sense. 

 

I tried swapping out a different monitor, that made no difference.

 

Contacted someone that I felt was more knowledgeable about what might be happening and this was his response...Dead motherboard. If it was just the video chip, (or card if you're fortunate enough to have a dedicated video card) then the mouse and keyboard will still work. I just fixed one for a lady with that exact same problem. Motherboard looks to be the same color, so it may even be the same model. It was an ASUS. Those OEM, off the shelf motherboards that come in those OEM, off the shelf computer are never really all that great. Its sort of like something like an 89 hp honda civic, vs a 410hp Ford mustang. Something to that effect. OEM vs Aftermarket. Those OEM boards are just BARELY enough to get the job done, And, they'll last for years doing it. Sometimes forever. But when they do die, its typically because they're just... inexpensive boards designed to sell to the masses. Its another part that generally doesn't die. But sometimes, every once in awhile, one does.

 

I have asked him for more specific information about where I should be getting a motherboard and what type would give me a plugnplay experience but have not heard back from him so I am hoping someone here could clue me in.

 

Below are some pictures of what my screen looks like after only a short period of time of turning the unit on, also a shot of the internals of my computer, maybe someone can confirm that I do not indeed have a video card.

 

Thank-you

 

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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 07:23 PM

Looking at the specs for this computer it appears to have on-board graphics, at least as built, but have a look at this image, a modified version of your third one. It should be self-explanatory.

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/0wr1tfrbdvg6rnh/HP%20Pavilliona220N.jpg?dl=0

 

Basically, unless that expansion card that is plugged at the bottom left of your image is a video card, then you have on-board video and it is all part of the motherboard.

 

Even if it is on-board graphics, it might be worth your while if you are really attached to these computers (they are really due for a rest and replacement !) it might be possible to source a video card which you could use in one of the unoccupied expansion slots above that card.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 1930

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 08:14 PM

Thank-you Chris, the port at the bottom is a phone line connection so I guess the theory of motherboard failure is looking to be correct.

 

Yes I am quite attached to these computers and so I will do what would be the all around best method of repair. What would you suggest as my next move? If it were your desktop what option would you go with other than to opt for a replacement unit?

 

Is it possible for you or someone to specifically tell me what I would need to purchase to fix the issue?



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 04:14 PM

Your problem here is that these are quite old computers, after all Vista was released in January 2007 !  Basically you have two possible ways to go, apart from replacement. See if you can find a video card to fit one of the expansion ports or replace the motherboard (mobo).

 

If you can find a video card at an acceptably low price - because you won't know if it will solve your problem until after you have fitted it - it is the easier way to go. This support article from HP tells you how to do it, and it certainly isn't difficult.

 

http://support.hp.com/in-en/document/c04100688

 

This article suggests that the best graphics card that will fit inside your case is a Radeon 4670 AGP. it might be worth looking on ebay for one -

 

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090713123412AAzfrXf

 

The other way to go is to replace the mobo, if you can find one. I very much doubt you will be able to get one from HP, you might be able to source one second hand but you will need the part number / serial number before you start looking. You will probably find it buried under that tangle of cables !  But this is a lot of work.

 

Seriously, my best advice is to back up the data on the hard drive and buy a new - or at least newer - computer, one at least running Win 7. There are plenty of second hand Win 7 machines on the market and it is not that much of a learning curve going from XP to Win 7. If this happened to one of my computers I wouldn't think twice, I'd bin it if it was that old. Apart from anything else it is nearly two years since MS ended support for XP. Sorry I can't be more positive.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#5 1930

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 08:46 PM

Thanks Chris, why is it not possible to replace whatever electrical component that is on the motherboard that has gone bad only?

 

Would this be the part number that I would need to find ?

 

EDIT: Doing a google search using this long number provided zero results.

 

I was under the assumption that I could buy a new motherboard and install, I was under the impression that people build computers often using parts from different manufacturers and Frankenstein computers together. I did not think it would be this difficult to replace.

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Edited by 1930, 24 February 2016 - 08:55 PM.


#6 WebWalker67

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 12:38 AM

I will have problem to find new component for a aging old pc.

 

Usually you need to buy them from second hand market ....



#7 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 07:53 PM

To take your points in order.

 

You can't replace the components on the mobo because you simply cannot establish which components are faulty and, on top of that, they use surface mount technology which is essentially non-repairable by almost every body who owns a soldering iron. I consider myself in the 'expert' class with a soldering iron and I wouldn't even try.

 

I don't know if that is the part number or not, but I would expect it to be printed on the board itself.

 

As I said earlier, it is highly unlikely that you can buy a mobo for this board. You might find one on e-bay which is probably your best shot, or even a complete a220n.

 

I object to your word 'Frankenstein' !  I am sitting writing this at a computer I built myself !  Your problem here is that both HP and Dell - because they are high volume manufacturers - tend to use non-standard parts which fit their cases and standard parts don't.

 

These computers owe you nothing, they were built with an expected service life of about 5 - 6 years, it really is time to let go !  I stand by the advice I gave in  the last paragraph in my #4.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#8 1930

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 05:33 AM

Thanks, Im going to keep searching for a solution, I do appreciate your input



#9 1930

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 11:03 AM

maybe some of you guys would be interested in following along with this and these guys here http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthread.php?51387-HP-Pavilion-a220n&p=403869#post403869 have been VERY helpful as well






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