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What a wonderful finding with windows 10!


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#1 Robert House

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 03:38 AM

Finally there is a solution that window 10 offers that I thought would never come.  Refreshing my computer without losing the apps.  Well, supposedly it is possible within Windows 10 itself.  However every time I've tried it I get errors.  I have to find the latest build and have that available as a reference for the computer to refresh.  So far it's never worked for me.  Reluctantly, more than once with all the bugs Windows 10 has I've had to sacrifice my programs if I wanted the OS back in good order. 

 

I'd make numerous images every couple of days and they take a lot of space.  Plus, I've found out more than once that when in a tight spot and I must get the image back, I'm treated with "corrupt image" That is with the Windows 10 image maker and Macrium and also Acronis.  It's been something I've accepted as a coin toss over the years that's why I make so many backup's.

 

This time Windows  10 bugs started cropping up again after an update.. The task bar was floating and flashing and I couldn't open folders by clicking on them any more and in the error log the list went on and on with warnings and critical alerts and finally when trying to make another image it refused and said the C drive is corrupt.  That's all fine and good but this time chkdsk couldn't fix it. So in the forums the best answer was to make a new user account. I tried that but to get your self back as the user you have to make a non Microsoft account, transfer data to that account, delete the primary Microsoft account and then make another Microsoft account in my name and transfer that data again from the local account just made.  That was time consuming and was not the best answer because the folders would still not open with a click or two clicks!

 

Throwing up my hands I said that's it, I'm going to do a clean install of windows 10.  In the back of my mind I'm thinking since it doesn't have a key I'll have to first install windows 8.1 and dig up its key somewhere. (I'm not good with keeping things like that around). Well, I went to the windows 10 download webpage and recall reading that if you do a reinstall over windows 10 that it should be fine and it will keep all your files.  Because I had never been able to do that with a disc of windows 10 I was skeptical but guess what?  Eureka!   It actually did exactly what it said it would do and was able to completely update windows 10 without deleting all my programs!  I couldn't believe it worked so well.  Maybe I've been in the dark or really just had bad luck, but for me this is an earth shaking defining moment in my computer life.  No need for images of entire computer and files.  Just backup personal files now. I'm going to do a complete refresh keeping all my apps on my other computer just to be sure I didn't do this in a dream.  Please, Microsoft don't mess this up or change anything about the refresh process other than making it work within the installed windows 10. I just had to tell someone that may benefit from this because I don't think everyone knows this is possible. For real, I mean.  Lots of talk about it but until now it's finally worked as it has been claimed to work.  What a relief.



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#2 Niweg

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 02:24 PM

 I use Easeus Todo Backup Free that's been working perfectly for me for the last 5 years, but if you're just going to back up your data, you should at least turn System Restore on.  Go to the System applet of the Control Panel and click System Protection.  Then click on the C: drive, then click on the Configure button.  Click Turn System Protection on, then OK.  That way, you can always go back to a restore point if need be.  That's a lot faster than reinstalling Windows.

 

 Good luck.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#3 Artbuc

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 05:10 AM

I use Easeus Todo Backup Free that's been working perfectly for me for the last 5 years, but if you're just going to back up your data, you should at least turn System Restore on.  Go to the System applet of the Control Panel and click System Protection.  Then click on the C: drive, then click on the Configure button.  Click Turn System Protection on, then OK.  That way, you can always go back to a restore point if need be.  That's a lot faster than reinstalling Windows.
 
 Good luck.

I checked to make sure my System Protection is on. I also created a restore point but I am not sure if I needed to do that. Are restore points automatically created periodically or do I have to manually create them? Thanks.

Edited by Artbuc, 02 March 2016 - 05:11 AM.


#4 britechguy

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 10:21 AM

System restore points are created either when you create them manually or the system determines that a change is being made (typically, installation of new software or significant Windows Updates) that warrants the creation of a restore point.

 

You can easily check out what system restore points your system has available without actually using them.  Open your System Properties, select the System Protection link, click on the System Restore button, in the System Restore dialog check the "Show more restore points" checkbox.  All restore points that the system is maintaining at the moment, the date of their creation, and the reason for their creation are shown.  You can then just hit the Cancel button to terminate System Restore.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
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#5 Artbuc

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 12:04 PM

Thanks Brian.

#6 Robert House

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 03:34 PM

Yes indeed. That goes without saying that I do that. Unfortunately it often does not hold enough restore points that go far back enough to cover all the issues. or, it gives an error, despite my scrupulousness of attending to that mechanism and says no restore points are saved! Or again some problem that it just isn't available for my needs. But thank you to point that obvious,easy way out of an error.  I find the system restore is more helpful for an immediate need to revert to a time usually within the last 24 hours. For longer than that I use system images which have been working OK lately but, again, are never foolproof. 

 

By the way this keeping personal apps is not an option if you attempt a system refresh within windows 10 itself.  You know, where you navigate to the two ways to refresh.  It's either a total reinstall and erase all previous installation apps and files.. Or, erasing all apps that were purchased and/or installed after Windows 10 earlier installation and keeping other files. 

 

It's only when you use (try to get the very latest iteration of windows 10-as updated as possible) burned to a disk or USB stick. And do an install over the problematic prior installed windows 10.  Miraculously, it is in every sense of the word a refreshed OS with 99% of all apps intact and functional along with all personal files.  It may uninstall an app or two that it claims is not compatible with this refresh.  Spechey it doesn't like for some reason. Share the good news. It makes one want to do weekly OS refreshes, it's thus far that reliable and easy and takes a max 20-30 minutes if on SSD.  Also, if all is good, I delete windows.old which can be pretty large, such as 20-40GB

I've done this twice now and again it's a fantastic game changer in my dealings with the bugs, immaturity of windows 10.  Simply a Godsend because my Grandmother's maiden name is Murphy.  What can go wrong, will go wrong.  It has been passed on down to me when it comes to dealing with computers. However, thankfully I'm adept at other technical endeavors.  Good day! Rob :bananas:






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