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Remove Orphaned Packages


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#1 rozzer

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Posted 11 February 2016 - 06:34 AM

Hi

Now I have Linux 17.1 (64) I see in the menu a new entry for
'Remove Orphaned Packages' I checked it and there is 30 of them
in the Orphaned group, hundreds in the non-orphaned.
I did a google and it seems as though some have tried it and wrecked
there set-up.
Can anyone shed any light on it and what advice

Thanks

Cheers

Edited by rozzer, 11 February 2016 - 06:36 AM.


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#2 mremski

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Posted 11 February 2016 - 07:29 AM

Not sure how the item works, but in general "orphaned" packages are extras that were installed when you installed a package (call it PackageA).  If you decide you do not want PackageA and you uninstall it, the extras may not be uninstalled, so they are orphaned.  Sometimes if you install something else later (call it PackageB), an orphaned package may satisfy a dependency, so it is not orphaned anymore.

 

Here's a link to using Synaptic Package Manager to remove them.   You can also just leave them be;  they take up disk space and maybe RAM if they are actually running.

 

http://mintnext.blogspot.com/2012/10/orphaned-packages.html


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#3 MadmanRB

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Posted 11 February 2016 - 04:04 PM

Typically in Linux there are packages called dependencies as opposed to say windows where you put a .Exe file and it extracts itself on the system on Linux its a multitude of different packages. These dependencies are not necessarily bad things and can help install other packages as well plus some of them are critical to the system itself so take caution when removing such files, orphaned packages are not necessarily bad either and also May help in future package installment

Edited by MadmanRB, 11 February 2016 - 04:04 PM.

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#4 Guest_GNULINUX_*

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Posted 11 February 2016 - 04:10 PM

Unless you're really short of disk space just leave them, too many systems have been bricked by removing them!  :wink:

 

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#5 rozzer

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 01:29 AM

Hi

Thanks all for your valued advice.
I have decided to leave it alone as I have lots of space
and they are not causing any issues and rather safe than sorry.

Cheers

Edited by rozzer, 12 February 2016 - 01:29 AM.


#6 wizardfromoz

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 02:36 AM

Hi rozzer

 

First up, I would stick with your decision above - if you have plenty of space, and there are no issues ...

 

Just from my observations, the following applies:

 

  1. Linux dependencies are not unlike Windows Common Files. If you have a suite in Windows such as MS Office, comprising Word, Excel, Powerpoint and others, there will have been installed a Common Files segment, which all can draw from. Likewise with Linux.
  2. If you choose in Linux to remove packages or an application via your (Synaptic) Package Manager, you will be presented with a choice to Remove or to Totally Remove. The latter removes all dependencies that were installed as well. That is a (typically) safe option.
  3. If you perform your updates from Terminal via eg <sudo apt-get update && apt-get upgrade>, or equivalent, you will sometimes see a reference to words of the equivalent to "these packages were installed previously and are no longer needed. Use apt-get autoremove to remove them". Also a safe option.

A lot of the superfluous leftovers are of the "lib" variety, that is, Libraries, not unlike .dll's (Dynamic Link Libraries) under Windows, and we know how many of them are orphaned, if you have ever done a cleanup.

 

Bottom line is as described above, they may be of use again. And bear in mind Linux gets far less fragmented than Windows.

 

Hope this explains a little.

 

:wizardball: Wizard

 

Edited typo


Edited by wizardfromoz, 12 February 2016 - 02:37 AM.


#7 rozzer

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 04:56 AM

Hi Wizard

 

Thanks for your informative reply and it certainly does help.

 

Much appreciated.

 

Cheers :cool:


Edited by rozzer, 12 February 2016 - 04:59 AM.


#8 cat1092

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 05:59 AM

 

 

 And bear in mind Linux gets far less fragmented than Windows.

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

That's how efficient the modern ext4 journaling file system is, versus NTFS/FAT32/exFAT, the Linux distro knows where to store files to prevent fragmentation, so that's why we don't need a defrag tool. :)

 

As for the 'orphaned' packages, I'll leave these alone until I clean install the entire OS (both root, /home & Swap) again. If there's plenty of drive space, no worries. Most of these, more than we'd think, are in the /home partition, there's a lot more there than the folders of the user. This is why before performing a total clean install, will move all of the user's folders to an external, may take a bit if there's a few VM's. Then after clean install, copy everything back, using the drag & drop method (both ways). They'll store on a NTFS drive fine, yet do not defrag these folders. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 wizardfromoz

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 05:12 PM

Just to add to Cat's comments - if you are in your File Manager, at your Home folder (usually described with your user name), you might only see 8 - 9 folders. Press ^H (control-h), and you will see what he means. The dot before the folders and files tells Linux to hide them from standard view.

 

Cheers

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#10 rozzer

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Posted 13 February 2016 - 01:31 AM

Hi

Thanks again Cat & Wizard

 

Cheers :thumbup2:


Edited by rozzer, 13 February 2016 - 01:34 AM.


#11 wizardfromoz

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Posted 13 February 2016 - 02:31 AM

You are most welcome!

 

Enjoy Linux, I do

 

:wizardball: Wizard

 

BTW - I try to look after everyone equally, but I have a soft spot for those born in the 50s, embracing Linux at a later age as I have done - 1st January, eh? Had a mate once, people would ring in the New Year, and later say - "oh, and Happy Birthday, Steve", lol



#12 MadmanRB

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Posted 13 February 2016 - 03:12 AM

Both my parents are using linux, both in ther 60's. My dad runs a full linux laptop and my mom uses a chromebook. Both are happy being outside the windows ecosystem

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#13 cat1092

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Posted 13 February 2016 - 04:42 AM

Both my parents are using linux, both in ther 60's. My dad runs a full linux laptop and my mom uses a chromebook. Both are happy being outside the windows ecosystem

 

MadmanRB, great to hear the good news! :thumbup2:

 

This at least helps to keep them from falling to prey on the alternative, as long as neither opens funky emails & doesn't believe anything too good to be true. :)

 

As I recall things, Chrome OS is derived from a Linux OS, Gentoo if not mistaken. I believe that shadow-warrior is more knowledgeable about it than myself, and am fairly certain it's were I got the information from. It's kind of odd that Chrome OS users aren't lumped in with Linux users, there are other licensed distros that are, and one that is on the DistroWatch site that isn't in ReactOS. Not sure of why it's inclusion, since it''s designed to run Windows software, and more odd, is that this project has been 'in the works' prior to me becoming a Linux user. 

 

At least you can lay down at night & not having to be concerned about infections getting to your parents, for now anyway. As it stands, there are no virus or Malware samples 'in the wild' towards Linux users. Hopefully that'll always be the case, and neither of your parents gets hit with the nasty Malware infections that dogs Windows users. While we have a lengthy line in the Am I Infected section, some goes unreported, either being fixed by independent users (some not quite having the skills for the job), or the Geek Squad line, where it may take as long to repair the system & charge over $200. Only to have the nasties return in hours, days or a week later. Which leads to the final solution, use the Recovery partition to reinstall, if damaged or doesn't know how to make that bootable again, will return and be charged more. of which I'd trust the folks on this forum better.

 

Or better yet, have a Linux install & not be concerned, as does your parents! :)

 

EDIT: I'm sure if either has a question in regards to orphaned packages, they'll both know whom to turn for assistance. :thumbup2:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 13 February 2016 - 04:57 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 pcpunk

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Posted 13 February 2016 - 03:31 PM

I would love to hear another angle about this if someone has the time.  

 

1. For instance, if this is present in the "Menu", then Mint must have put it there because many packages have been installed, and perhaps removed, right?  Maybe rozzer can elaborate on that?

  a. And if so, wouldn't it be safe to remove if Mint put the Entry there?

 

Very curious about all this as I have never seen this on my KDE 17.1, perhaps it is a little different than Cinnamon?

 

Also, I can't imagine that I don't have "Orphaned Packages" as I have installed and removed many packages.  Perhaps Installed more than removed - and that is why I don't have this Menu Entry.

 

Thanks guys, pcpunk


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#15 MadmanRB

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Posted 13 February 2016 - 06:49 PM

Correct if there is a GUI package Mint recognized it will pop it as a entry in the menu and will do so in both KDE and Cinnamon.

Though there is a slight delay in cinnamon, sometimes new apps wont appear until you log out.

Really the app menu entry works practically the same way as it does in windows, the only time it doesnt show up is if its some command line or some library or something.


Edited by MadmanRB, 13 February 2016 - 06:50 PM.

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