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Plugging in speakers


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#1 Coolos

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 05:30 PM

Hello,

I recently purchased an arcade machine cabinet, with speakers inside. I plan on putting a computer inside to run games through the cabinet, and I was wondering if there was any way to hook up these speakers, which were used with the previous arcade game, to my computer. The speakers combine with some sort of 5 pin, female connector, but I do not know the name of it. Here is what it looks like:

 

Attached File  12394661_1302532033096985_140896721_o.jpg   83.34KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  12696413_1302532066430315_1404503713_o.jpg   110.32KB   0 downloads

 

My computer runs Windows 7.

Any ideas to connect it to my motherboard, or through an adapter with USB or something? Thanks!

-Coolos



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#2 Platypus

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 05:38 PM

You'd need to provide a small power amplifier to take the line level signal from the computer output and drive the speakers. Arcade machines probably have speakers needing around 10 to 20 Watts, and if you're lucky the speaker units will have ratings stamped on them. The power rating and impedance in ohms, combined with the actual function of the speakers (how many, whether wide-range, low frequency & treble...) will help determine what is needed.

 

If you can let us know details, maybe pictures, we can make further suggestions.


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#3 Coolos

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 06:00 PM

Sure, 

the speaker just has maximum wattage, but its probably possible to find out amps and such with the name. Here it is:

 

Attached File  12669994_1302544146429107_2099233003_o.jpg   124.89KB   0 downloads

 

Edit: there are two speakers, both using the same 5 pin connector.


Edited by Coolos, 08 February 2016 - 06:02 PM.


#4 Platypus

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 07:58 PM

They are el-cheapo car speakers, they may or may not be the original used for the machine. There doesn't seem to be any listing anywhere for their impedance, but car speakers are often 4 Ohm. If the computer that will be used has a decent capacity PSU, it is certainly possible to bring out 12V to run a basic car audio amp, and that would do the job.


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#5 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 11:38 AM

Great idea! Hope everything goes well!

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#6 Coolos

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 04:54 PM

Sorry, I know a bit about computers, and not much about electricity. You probably already answered this, but what would I need to actually get the thing plugged into my motherboard and compatible?

 

I mean, what specific hardware, like any plug adapters or cables?


Edited by Coolos, 09 February 2016 - 08:18 PM.


#7 Platypus

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 10:00 PM

Your motherboard will almost certainly have a 3.5mm stereo line out jack, which you'd normally plug the jack from powered computer speakers into. An amp driving the unit speakers does the same job. So the interconnecting cable would be one often described as iPod or MP3 player lead, to go from the 3.5mm on the mainboard to whatever input sockets are on the amp. Those sockets may be a pair of RCA jacks, although some amps have a 3.5mm socket too, also maybe labelled MP3 or iPod.

 

Car amps now tend to have huge power outputs, which makes many of them unsuitable for your purpose, since they would need far too much current. There's a couple of links below to offer some ideas, they are not specific recommendations, just illustrations, but they may be suitable.

 

The first looks like a respectable moderate power conventional car amp, that you would hook up to a head unit in the car. A unit like this should be able to be just connected to the computer instead, and if the computer has a powerful enough PSU to give an extra maybe 150-180W, it would likely run from the 12V available in the computer. That would be too much to draw from something like a spare HDD Molex plug though, so a soldered connection would need to be made to the PSU wiring. You mightn't want to go that far.

 

Another inexpensive possibility to try (with less known about quality) would be little amps available on eBay etc like in second link. They are lower power (ignore the 200W on the example one, it only has 24W power requirement), and could be supplied from a spare HDD Molex connector, or a plugpack. It looks to have a choice of input, both 2 x RCA and 3.5mm stereo.

 

With each amp, you'd connect the speakers up the same way as car speakers. Clip the wires off the existing connector, and the two speakers would just act as left and right channels. If the speakers have + and - markings, connect those wires to red and black speaker terminals on the amp. If not, you'd just do them both the same way, choose one terminal on each speaker, big or small, for its wire to go to black & the other goes to red,

 

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/pioneer-180w-class-ab-bridgeable-2-channel-amplifier-black/9563329.p?id=1219424187144&skuId=9563329

 

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/200W-2-1channel-12V-Mini-HiFi-Stereo-Amplifier-Audio-MP3-Booster-Car-Home-Motor-/361434920451?hash=item5427333603:g:zIoAAOSwbdpWUotx


Edited by Platypus, 10 February 2016 - 06:24 PM.

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#8 Coolos

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 03:57 PM

Okay thanks! I'll try out your suggestions and see what I can do. Thanks again for everyone who helped



#9 Platypus

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 06:25 PM

Good luck!


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