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advice on applying at a compute repair shop at age 15


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#1 bosidex

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 01:22 AM

so yeah basicly im 15 and i want to apply at a local computer repair shop

i found 2 that are close to me and i want to work there

im currently in 8th grade and taking a intro to information technology class where i will be getting my microsoft office certs soon

im really handy with computers i know how to install os's build a computer trouble shoot one repair one and basicly the normal things that computer repair shops do

but i need advice on getting a job at one of the computer repair shops any advice would be amazing

sorry if this is the wrong sub forums

also i have access to lynda.com provided by my school district do u guys think that completing courses there and putting them on my resume would be a good idea? 

thanks.



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#2 NickAu

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 03:30 AM

I would suggest you approach them about a job and offer to work for free for a month with the understanding that if it works out you get a job, show them what you can do, But remember at first you may only be making coffee cleaning up and putting away tools and parts.


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#3 bosidex

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 03:38 AM

I would suggest you approach them about a job and offer to work for free for a month with the understanding that if it works out you get a job, show them what you can do, But remember at first you may only be making coffee cleaning up and putting away tools and parts.

yeah i was thinking of asking for a internship first

when i walk in the shop do i ask for the manager and ask if i can internship here? 



#4 NickAu

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 03:52 AM

Basically yes, Introduce yourself and explain what you are there for, Have a resume with you outlining education interests experience, Make a good impression do not over dress for it smart casual, a shirt with a collar slacks not jeans and no sand shoes. These are things I would notice if you came to my place looking for work. And no funky hair do.  


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#5 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 04:05 AM

I think we in Australia generally work for free for 2 weeks, well i know i did when i started working but times have changed and they cant generally do it any more because of insurance mate.

I still attend TAFE in QLD to give advice to my old teachers and help the students every hour and then and one thing i noticed is, the parents come in, say how smart there kid id because they are always on the computer.

But....what they dont know is that %99 of kids are actually playing games and dont truly understand anything about TPC/IP protocols, sub-netting (Yeh he knows what 192.168.1.1 is but not the class) , dont understand packet structures, dont understand the true underlying system they use, dont know how to remotely execute anything, basically they just install/format a drive and install a %OS%, drivers and software.

 

Working at a shop is a lot more than that mate so the best advice i would and could ever give is never ever feel afraid to say you do NOT know what you are doing.

Dont ever ruin a production environment,laptop.workstation,server.

Its always good to have a go but do it in your own time and learn how to break something and then fix it.

 

I have had contractors walz into my server room boasting how much they know and i end up asking them to leave then school the hell out of them.

I hate to boast and i wont boast but i guarantee i know more than a lot of System Engineers around my town.

Im never afraid to ask for help either because you can never know everything and being honest is the true sign of a employable person.



#6 bosidex

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 04:09 AM

I think we in Australia generally work for free for 2 weeks, well i know i did when i started working but times have changed and they cant generally do it any more because of insurance mate.

I still attend TAFE in QLD to give advice to my old teachers and help the students every hour and then and one thing i noticed is, the parents come in, say how smart there kid id because they are always on the computer.

But....what they dont know is that %99 of kids are actually playing games and dont truly understand anything about TPC/IP protocols, sub-netting (Yeh he knows what 192.168.1.1 is but not the class) , dont understand packet structures, dont understand the true underlying system they use, dont know how to remotely execute anything, basically they just install/format a drive and install a %OS%, drivers and software.

 

Working at a shop is a lot more than that mate so the best advice i would and could ever give is never ever feel afraid to say you do NOT know what you are doing.

Dont ever ruin a production environment,laptop.workstation,server.

Its always good to have a go but do it in your own time and learn how to break something and then fix it.

 

I have had contractors walz into my server room boasting how much they know and i end up asking them to leave then school the hell out of them.

I hate to boast and i wont boast but i guarantee i know more than a lot of System Engineers around my town.

Im never afraid to ask for help either because you can never know everything and being honest is the true sign of a employable person.

woah this changed my perspective thank u for writing this

so do u think i should complete some lynda.com courses and read a comptia a+ book for extra insurence? 



#7 NickAu

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 04:12 AM

Hey jammer long time no see.

 

 

But....what they dont know is that %99 of kids are actually playing games and dont truly understand anything about TPC/IP protocols, sub-netting (Yeh he knows what 192.168.1.1 is but not the class) , dont understand packet structures, dont understand the true underlying system they use, dont know how to remotely execute anything, basically they just install/format a drive and install a %OS%, drivers and software.

Kids now days lol, They didn't learn the hard way like we did.


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#8 bosidex

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 04:18 AM

Hey jammer long time no see.

 

 

But....what they dont know is that %99 of kids are actually playing games and dont truly understand anything about TPC/IP protocols, sub-netting (Yeh he knows what 192.168.1.1 is but not the class) , dont understand packet structures, dont understand the true underlying system they use, dont know how to remotely execute anything, basically they just install/format a drive and install a %OS%, drivers and software.

Kids now days lol, They didn't learn the hard way like we did.

get with the times old man :P (joke)

just wondering what was it like learning something back in the day?

im guessing u break something and try to fix it 

or i.t books

im wrong am i :P 



#9 Queen-Evie

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 11:36 AM

You need to present yourself as professional as possible. In addition to what Nick said in post #4, I offer this:
 
Proper grammar and spelling if you have to write things down. No text speak such as "u", "ur", etc.
 
Correct punctuation, capitalization and sentence structure. I took one of your posts and corrected it so you can see what I'm talking about.
 

Get with the times old man. :P (joke)
I'm just wondering what was it like learning something back in the day.
I'm guessing you break something and try to fix it. 
Or read IT books.
I'm wrong am I :P


This will apply no matter what you do in life. You have to be able to communicate effectively. Employers do take that into consideration during the hiring process.

If you have a resume, they will be able to see if you sound professional in your writing or if you take the "lazy" way approach when you wrote the resume.

*side note*

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forum-rules/

When posting, please use proper grammar. Refrain from 'text-message' style substitutions of words like 'u' for 'you', and 'ur' for 'your'. This is a multi-national forum, and some of our non-english speaking members must use translation software which is confused by abbreviations. Most of our volunteer members are very busy helping as many people as they can, and a post that is hard to read will often be overlooked.


Another point: When you talk to a prospective employer, don't litter your statements with "you know" (because they don't know). Avoid "yeah" and use YES. Little things like that go a long way. We all have our quirks when speaking and you must first find out what yours are so you can avoid them during the interview process.

Be polite, say "sir" or "m'am" if that is something you have been taught to do.

If asked "do you know how to...." and it is something you don't know how to do say so and add that you are willing to learn.

You don't say where you live. Find out what child labor laws where you live are so you will know when you can and cannot work. The laws vary but generally as a 15 year old still in school the work hours are very restricted on days when the next day is a school day.

The laws also state what you cannot do, but in a computer shop most of those will not apply since you will not be operating heavy machinery, meat slicers, working in boiler rooms, etc.

By knowing those laws, you can let the employer know you can work X number of hours on Saturday or after school. This will also let him/her know you are aware of the laws.

Good luck in your quest.

Edited by Queen-Evie, 08 February 2016 - 11:42 AM.


#10 Demonslay335

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 11:54 AM

But remember at first you may only be making coffee cleaning up and putting away tools and parts.

 

Amen to that. I applied at my current employer when I was 16. I basically said "hey, I have experience programming for 3 years, here's some higher-level programs and websites I've made, and my Cisco classes I've taken", and they were like "that's cool, we'll have you mop the floor"*. A few months later, I was working on PCs full-time, and now 8 years later, I'm the lead developer for our whole programming division and a senior certified technician teaching all our other techs. :)

 

Gotta start somewhere. As long as you are willing to learn and can do so in an effective way that is productive to business, you'll be sure to progress. Just don't overdo it and try to impress in an annoying way; just be a diligent worker and know your stuff. Follow directions and try not to constantly make the same mistakes.

 

 

*Not the real dialog, obviously it was more professional. Summarized for comical effect. :P


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#11 Queen-Evie

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 01:54 PM

Gotta start somewhere. As long as you are willing to learn and can do so in an effective way that is productive to business, you'll be sure to progress. Just don't overdo it and try to impress in an annoying way; just be a diligent worker and know your stuff. Follow directions and try not to constantly make the same mistakes.


So true. You will have to prove yourself as someone who is willing to do whatever they ask you to do. Those menial things serve a purpose-to find out what kind of worker you will be. If they tell you to clean the bathroom, do it with the mindset of "I'm the best bathroom cleaner in the world" and then clean better than anyone else ever has. Don't complain about it even though you might detest doing it. When you finish, let them know and ask if there is anything you forgot to do. This will show that you are not afraid to ask questions and that you want to make sure it is perfectly done.

Your attitude will be judged.

#12 JohnnyJammer

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 07:30 PM

 

Hey jammer long time no see.

 

 

But....what they dont know is that %99 of kids are actually playing games and dont truly understand anything about TPC/IP protocols, sub-netting (Yeh he knows what 192.168.1.1 is but not the class) , dont understand packet structures, dont understand the true underlying system they use, dont know how to remotely execute anything, basically they just install/format a drive and install a %OS%, drivers and software.

Kids now days lol, They didn't learn the hard way like we did.

get with the times old man :P (joke)

just wondering what was it like learning something back in the day?

im guessing u break something and try to fix it 

or i.t books

im wrong am i :P

 

Im actually a late starter mate and didnt really start getting into IT properly until i was 32.

My first pc was about 2002-2003 just before msn closed chat. At first i never did anything really but then about a year later i started to tinker and did a bit of reading and by around 2006 i thought i knew a lot when i actually didn't mate.

 

I learn cisco and was at CCNA level but i havnt really used that in 5 years so i waist'd my time learning that, well didnt really waist it but i never needed to understand the level because i dont configure WAN based routers as its all managed by the ISP.

 

Just dont expect to earn 80K a year in your first year and it takes years to get good cash, problem with a lot of youth around my town is they leave UNI or high school and expect to get a thousand bucks in the hand in their first year.

I earnt $2.30 an hour when i first started work in 1997 and did 52 hour weeks LOL, now im around 33 an hour which still isnt a great deal but more than enough to live in.



#13 NickAu

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 07:40 PM

 

Gotta start somewhere.

To this day Queen-Evie makes me mop the BC staffroom and if I don't I do not get a bucket of fish heads for dinner.


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#14 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 08:31 PM

You obviously have some skills and a considerable degree of enthusiasm, but remember there is a difference between doing something as a hobby and doing it for work. If it is a hobby, you decide what gets done, when. If it's work, your boss decides what gets done and when !  And since he is paying the wages, he is usually right !

 

Interest, enthusiasm and a willingness to do whatever will get you a long way in the search for work, even if only part time at first, that you will enjoy.

 

Best of luck,

 

Chris Cosgrove



#15 mjd420nova

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 10:28 PM

Having learned electronics before the transistor gave me a through grounding in dealing with high voltages and safety therein.  I try to get all those interested in computers to first learn electronics.  Understand how a gate works and why.  Todays computers have a cage built around the 120/240 volt power supplies and is replaced as a whole.  Thus, there is nothing within any case that can hurt you and this can give you a false sense of security.  However, there is everything inside that case that can be damaged just by you sticking your hands in there.  The first time you experience an ESD, you may not no it and it will lead to some serious troubleshooting headaches.  Grounding is all important and don't neglect it.  Showing up for work with a wrist strap, cord and clip to ground yourself can enlighten an employer to your awareness of the situation.  Don't be afraid to ask those questions, you are young and need to learn.  I've been in electronics for over 50 years and I still learn something new every day.  A resume' may only consist of vital info and schooling.  Expounding on servicing others gear, building your own, may or may not appeal to some employers.  A skilled tech can tell in five minutes whether any prospective employee knows his stuff.  A vocational school after high school (that diploma is most important) or even part of a community outreach program.  I spent one summer at a Boys and Girls Club repairing old TVs that were donated but not working.  I put my own time and money into getting over 75 ready to sell at an auction to benefit the club.  That's just an example of how to learn and grow with the skills.






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