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How to become IT Support Engineer?


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5 replies to this topic

#1 Bhoobalan

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Posted 07 February 2016 - 08:46 AM

Hi friends,
Hope you all are doing well, I am new to this forum. I want to become a IT support Engineer for that what are the things that i need to know technically?


Thanks in advance 
K.Bhoobalan

 

Edit: Moved topic from General Chat to the more appropriate forum. ~ Animal



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 07:06 PM

Job titles in the Information Technology (IT) industry don't mean the same thing for all people.  Very few companies use Engineer in any IT job title.  It seems there was some back lash from the engineering community that IT people are not engineers.

 

IT means different things to different people.  Normally IT is broken down to three levels; Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3.  Level 1 is the Help Desk type of job.  Level 2 is local support, the people who go to the user's desk to fix problems.  Level 3 are Subject Matter Experts (SME) for a particular IT function.

 

Level 1 positions are where most people start.  Level 1 has familiarity with PCs and basic troubleshooting, but normally operate from scripts or knowledge base articles (KBAs).  To tell you the truth Level 2 people would prefer if you don't know how to fix it escalate the ticket, don't guess you'll only make it worse.

 

Level 2 are the more advanced IT positions where you will have to learn how to troubleshoot the problem and find the answer.  Level 2 has responsibility for a large number of things, computers, phones, printers, network, switches, and possible servers.  If you can't fix it after giving it an honest effort you can escalate to Level 3.

 

Level 3 is where tickets go to die.  If the ticket reached level 3 it is most likely a major issue.  Level 3 IT personnel will deal with vendors to find or develop solutions for problems.  Level 3 deals with a very small area of IT, but they are experts in it.

 

The question you need to ask yourself is, "What kind of IT work do you want to do?"  Then you can start learning the things that you will need to know.  Degrees and certifications won't guarantee a job, you'll need to get experience where you'll learn that your education was merely a foundation for all you need to know to do the job.



#3 TechScorp84

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 09:04 PM

I agree with the above response.  I started off working for the state with no degree but at the time I was in school.  I had previous experience so they decided to overlook the fact that I did not have a degree.  With becoming a IT professional you will quickly realize that a lot of times no matter what your job title says you may still be doing something that's not directly related to it.  My official title is computer support specialists, however for the past 5 years I've done everything from working in switches, servers, ip phones, etc, so don't get caught up in the job title just find out what it is you want to do in the IT field, because there is so much to choose from.



#4 Houdini5150

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 12:20 AM

Hardware and software troubleshooting. Know how to replace stuff. If it's a company who can spend money be able to swap hard drives in and out.

#5 RJMass1

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 11:51 PM

 I read this article awhile back I think you would find useful.

 

 https://www.thebalance.com/technical-support-engineer-skills-2062490



#6 pabon

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 12:25 PM

Hi friends,
Hope you all are doing well, I am new to this forum. I want to become a IT support Engineer for that what are the things that i need to know technically?


Thanks in advance 
K.Bhoobalan

 

Edit: Moved topic from General Chat to the more appropriate forum. ~ Animal

 

I like to be rather truthful with you, IT is information and its what you do with that information that matters most.

Engineer is a title. A nice title, when it comes to telling someone whats your job title.

But you asked what do you need to know. 

In my situation there was a time when I didn't want to know certain things.Like setting up cell phones for clients or installing a Cisco phone for clients.

I didn't want to know how to set up a network or server. All I wanted to do is built computers and preferably PCs only.

Then I came to a job that made me wish "If I only had taken the time to learn all those things" I got the job no problem. But I asked I wanted to learn those things as well.

So now that I know, I love laptops, I love it all and worked it all. from activating a Cell phone to doing a back up on a cell and restoring the users information on the new cell, to imaging any laptop or PC locally or remotely. 

So I have done all 3 levels of work. 

I guess what I want you to know is that you don't have to become you already are.

Somethings in this job, wither desktop support or Desktop Engineer or Field Engineer, may show things that are not interesting, but best thing to do is to become interested, so in your future should you need to know, you will have already learned it and wont need someone to teach you.

Its funny when your hired for a job in I-MAC (Temp) and your moving computers around as a temp your called upon to help even though its not your job tile, but because you know your able too.

The interesting thing is that the clients don't know your job or title, when your deploying a new laptop with their application installed and profile set up. They know you as IT only. They don't know whats your level. 

You will be told about all the problems they have and if you don't know then escalate, you will find that the people who the tickets go to are very close by you and if you acquired enough knowledge, you might find someone in Level 3 coming to you a level 1 for help.

So its the position your working in in the job, but count on doing it all.






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