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Which recovery partition can I delete?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 kkoz83

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 04:35 PM

Hi everybody, how are you doing?

 

First of all, I'm not 100% positive I'm starting this thread in the correct section so please move this thread if necessary.

 

I own a Dell desktop that came with Windows 8.1 Pro and now I upgraded to Windows 10 Pro (build 1511).  The upgrade was thru Windows Update - not a clean ISO install.

I also have a Dell Windows 8.1 Recovery USB media.

 

My question ---> Which (if any) partition can I delete?  ***I attached a screenshot of my Disk Management.*** I'm interested in deleting the 1 GB or 450 MB partition.

 

Thanks :-)

 

*** - how do I attach?



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#2 kkoz83

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 04:51 PM

I skipped the attached idea & you can see it here ---> http://imgur.com/SSG3k2U



#3 upallnite

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 10:54 PM

I don't see one here, but have you received an answer to this, maybe elsewhere?  I have a very similar question.  I'm running Windows 8.1, and wish to perform a system backup or image (need to replace my HDD, I think).  I don't know which of the 3 "Healthy Recovery Partitions" (500 MB, 350 MB, & 11.67 GB) I do not need to backup/restore to a new drive.

 

Any help will be greatly appreciated. 

Thanks.

 


Yust call me Sven.
Remember, no matter where you go, there you are.

#4 kkoz83

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Posted 14 April 2016 - 02:36 PM

I don't see one here, but have you received an answer to this, maybe elsewhere?  I have a very similar question.  I'm running Windows 8.1, and wish to perform a system backup or image (need to replace my HDD, I think).  I don't know which of the 3 "Healthy Recovery Partitions" (500 MB, 350 MB, & 11.67 GB) I do not need to backup/restore to a new drive.

 

Any help will be greatly appreciated. 

Thanks.

 

I never received any response.  I guess we're in the same boat - which side of the oars you want?  lol



#5 Paws

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 08:37 AM

Hi kkoz83,

Sorry to see that you received no replies to your topic... :(

Probably by now you may have moved on or got your answers elsewhere, however here's my 4 pennyworth.

 

1 Restore Partitions are a very good " get out of jail" solution when or else seems to have failed and should never be messed with without a great deal of careful though and consideration.

 

2 Knowing that you have the Dell Win 8.1 USB recovery media is a great insurance, but nothing is guaranteed to work all the time, even USB flash drives ( memory sticks) can fail and if that happens then the Recovery Partition is an excellent backstop...Remember the old adage often  used when talking about backups, that at least 3 copies of them are needed all kept on different media with at least one kept offsite on removable media... well that "rule" of at least 3... applies equally as well when considering a full system restore and the options available...

 

3 With your now Win 10 set up you have additional options to restore refresh or reset your Win 10 and these are in addition to your Win 8.1 options so things are looking good for you, however the default settings for the operation of System Restore points on Win 10 are often set to "off" by default, so its worth checking that this is operating on your C: drive, a lot of experts recommend that for typical users having System Restore points set to "ON" is a wise move.

 

4 Some folks like the approach of having "belt, braces and a piece of string" if you fall into this category then take a disc image (or two) using something like Macrium Reflect free ( or your favourite disc imaging software) keep the images safe on removable media (USB external drives are good for this and quite inexpensive these days)..... Keep the original safe, and make updated ones from time to time and should begin to feel quite secure...

 if you can keep your data files on a separate partition on your hard drive then normal back ups will complete the job and minimise the size of your disc images.

 

5 As to deleting the recovery partition I would recommend leaving it alone, the whole shebang is only 8 or 9Gb ..and with todays large hard drive capacities the "saving is not worthwhile...

 

Hope this helps

 

Regards

paws

PS customers are waiting so I'll come back to upalinit's points after close of business around 6.30pm this afternoon (18.30 hrs  Alpha or GMT+1



#6 kkoz83

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 11:26 AM

Thanks Paws.



#7 Paws

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 04:27 PM

 You are welcome kkoz83

:thumbup2:

Regards

paws



#8 Paws

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 04:39 PM

Hi upalinit,

Sorry for delay in getting back to you.... when making a disc image I would be inclined to make a complete image of the whole hard drive..

That way you can be certain that you have everything you need. Most disc imaging software uses a fair degree of compression in order to keep the file size reasonably small so picking and choosing particular partitions to image, is not generally called for ( unless you are an expert and know exactly what is required.)

 

If using Macrium Reflect free or similar software then be sure to create a bootable CD or USB key ,then in the event that Windows doesn't load at any time you will have a way of booting your machine and accessing your external hard drives which presumably you will be using to hold some of your images.

 

The disc imaging software includes a wizard to help making the bootable media a simple task, although you may have to access your UEFI  to ensure that Secure Boot is temporarily disabled and the correct boot device prioritised, before you will be able to boot from the recently created bootable media. Save the changes in UEFI with the bootable media inserted into your machine and it should boot into the removable media allowing you to access your disc images.

 

Post back if you need detailed directions on any of this.

Regards

paws


Edited by Paws, 16 April 2016 - 04:42 PM.





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