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What Would You Do?


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#1 sikntired

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 12:30 PM

Current OS is Win 7 Sp-1 Pro. Though I have several years support for this OS I have no intention of upgrading to Win 10, (for all of the reasons discussed not only here at BC but other forums as well.)

With that being said, I have downloaded and utilized a Live DVD of Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.2 (at the suggestion of members here), to become familiar with a new OS. I really like it !

I would appreciate any input from members as to my next steps to take. There is only one computer in this household and it is a desktop. Would it be advantageous to purchase a used or refurbished machine to install Linux and keep the current desktop with Win 7? JohnC_21 made this suggestion in the Win X Discussion Forum.

I know Linux plays well on older machines through posts made here and was wondering if this may be my best options or perhaps others could offer different options?

Just trying to get my "ducks in a row" through systematic planning and by exploring further all that Linux has to offer.


Edited by sikntired, 01 February 2016 - 12:31 PM.


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#2 mremski

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 01:11 PM

Are you the "owner" of the computer?  What do you want to be able to do?  Simple web browsing, email, "Office" type of stuff? A Linux system with 2-4GB of is a lot more useable than a Windows system with the same amount of ram.  That gives you lots of options on older machines that can be picked up for relatively short money.  You can play to your hearts content. 


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#3 Guest_GNULINUX_*

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 03:45 PM

Some time ago I was in the exact same position as you are now!  :wink:
 

If your machine is powerful enough just use VirtualBox/VMware to run some Linux distros.

If it's not powerful enough or you want to test it on real hardware, you can buy a second (cheaper) machine or dual boot your existing machine.

 

Greets!



#4 NickAu

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 04:14 PM

 

Would it be advantageous to purchase a used or refurbished machine to install Linux and keep the current desktop with Win 7?

If finances allow I would say yes.


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#5 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 06:28 PM

There is only one computer in this household and it is a desktop. Would it be advantageous to purchase a used or refurbished machine to install Linux and keep the current desktop with Win 7? JohnC_21 made this suggestion in the Win X Discussion Forum.

I know Linux plays well on older machines through posts made here and was wondering if this may be my best options or perhaps others could offer different options?

 

The cheapest route would be to setup a dual-boot; several members here have dual-boots or multi-boots. The easiest and safest route would be to purchase another computer for Linux. Ultimately it boils down to your comfort zone, and skill level. Sometimes setting up a dual-boot is easy (like really easy), other times it's a nightmare, and there is always risk involved so it's important to have a plan in place for that senario (eg: backups of everything, including operating systems).
 

What Would You Do?

 

Personally I would dual-boot, but that's because I know how to do it, and am comfortable with the process.

 

Regardless of whether you choose to dual-boot, buy another computer, or do something-else, welcome to world of Linux. :)



#6 sikntired

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 06:37 PM

Are you the "owner" of the computer?  What do you want to be able to do?  Simple web browsing, email, "Office" type of stuff? A Linux system with 2-4GB of is a lot more useable than a Windows system with the same amount of ram.  That gives you lots of options on older machines that can be picked up for relatively short money.  You can play to your hearts content. 

Yes, my wife and I are retired and use the computer as you described (web browsing, email, etc.)

 

Some time ago I was in the exact same position as you are now!  :wink:
 

If your machine is powerful enough just use VirtualBox/VMware to run some Linux distros.

If it's not powerful enough or you want to test it on real hardware, you can buy a second (cheaper) machine or dual boot your existing machine.

 

Greets!

 

Have heard of VirtualBox/VMware but don't have experience.

 

Here are System Specs:  Windows 7 Pro Sp-1 64 bit

                  Processor :      Pentium ® Dual-Core CPU  E5400 @ 2.70GHz

Installed Memory (RAM) :  6.00 GB   The Local C:/ drive has 547 GB free of 596 Gb.

 

 

 

Would it be advantageous to purchase a used or refurbished machine to install Linux and keep the current desktop with Win 7?

If finances allow I would say yes.

 

 

Well Nick, that is what was suggested as I stated earlier. Thanks for confirming. Guess if I choose that route I can check Ebay. Any other suggestions ?



#7 sikntired

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 06:44 PM

 

There is only one computer in this household and it is a desktop. Would it be advantageous to purchase a used or refurbished machine to install Linux and keep the current desktop with Win 7? JohnC_21 made this suggestion in the Win X Discussion Forum.

I know Linux plays well on older machines through posts made here and was wondering if this may be my best options or perhaps others could offer different options?

 

The cheapest route would be to setup a dual-boot; several members here have dual-boots or multi-boots. The easiest and safest route would be to purchase another computer for Linux. Ultimately it boils down to your comfort zone, and skill level. Sometimes setting up a dual-boot is easy (like really easy), other times it's a nightmare, and there is always risk involved so it's important to have a plan in place for that senario (eg: backups of everything, including operating systems).
 

What Would You Do?

 

Personally I would dual-boot, but that's because I know how to do it, and am comfortable with the process.

 

Regardless of whether you choose to dual-boot, buy another computer, or do something-else, welcome to world of Linux. :)

 

 Thanks hollowface for your input. My skill level with computers ? "know enough to be dangerous" but "not enough to be proficient". Probably would be more comfortable installing Linux on another machine.



#8 jargos

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 07:42 PM

Hi skntired;

 

You say you're retired ? Do you have kids .. grand kids ?

 

I have four adult kids and no dearth of desktops, laptops, tablets, cell phones .. and gadgets  I don't even know the purpose of (other than to waste their money on) in my house.

 

If you do have, surely you can snaffle an old machine from them ? They would probably thank you for getting it out of their room for them .. LOL ..

 

If not, walk past some privately owned small computer shops - they often have some excellent refurbished stuff. I saw a W7 desktop for $150 the other day, which, by my standards, was fine - and it came with a 3mth warranty, too.

 

Yes, the 'load on a separate machine'  was the best option, for me, anyway.


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#9 Ravenbar

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 08:38 PM

I'd go with a refurb if it's just something to learn/experiment on. That way you aren't risking screwing up your current system. I see refurb's on Newegg for less than $100. Some come with an OS, others don't(and are a bit cheaper yet).

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#10 Guest_GNULINUX_*

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 04:18 AM

Have heard of VirtualBox/VMware but don't have experience.
 
Here are System Specs:  Windows 7 Pro Sp-1 64 bit
                  Processor :      Pentium ® Dual-Core CPU  E5400 @ 2.70GHz
Installed Memory (RAM) :  6.00 GB   The Local C:/ drive has 547 GB free of 596 Gb.

It's not advisable to run a VM with that processor... So dual boot or a second machine are your options!

 

Greets!



#11 sikntired

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 10:08 AM

Thanks to all of you for taking the time to respond and offering solutions. Most likely will be looking for another machine to install Linux as this is the most plausible for me and my 'comfort zone'.  It will also afford me the option to have a second computer to utilize  in the event that it is needed.

 

The best to all.................



#12 pcpunk

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 03:13 PM

With that being said, I have downloaded and utilized a Live DVD of Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.2 (at the suggestion of members here), to become familiar with a new OS. I really like it !

I would download a lighter distro and run it from a usb created with Unetbootin, a LinuxLiveUSB.  Xfce would be nice, or, you could just use Cinnamon if you like.  It will be faster than a Disc, and more portable.  You can then save things to your Windows drive if you really wanted to while using linuxliveUSB, just be carefull not to infect windows.  I do this all the time, with word docs, screenshots, links and anything else that I want to save.  Keep the CD for safe online purchases and banking if you like. 

http://unetbootin.github.io/


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#13 sikntired

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 06:22 PM

pcpunk,

 

Thanks for dropping off your thoughts and recommendations. Will certainly look into all options including the unebootin link.



#14 raymac46

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Posted 04 February 2016 - 03:52 PM

Having dual booted, chainloaded and heaven knows what else, I'd just recommend getting a second machine by hook or by crook and installing Linux on that. I even built my latest machine especially for Linux.

Look for a 64 bit capable processor - dual core or above is great.

All Intel hardware (such as an old Dell Optiplex) makes a great Linux machine.

2 GB is about the minimum RAM I would get.

Make sure you have space to install a wifi card - a full size tower is better than a desktop or small form factor unit.

Here's an example from a computer recycler near my home in Canada.

 

https://www.tte.ca/desktops/refurbished-desktops/dell-optiplex-760-sff-bq



#15 raymac46

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Posted 04 February 2016 - 04:10 PM

Here are the current specs of my main Linux driver:

 

Case

Cooler Master K280 ATX mid-tower

 

Intake Fan:

BitFenix Sceptre Pro 120mm

 

Exhaust Fan:

Corsair AF Performance 120mm

 

Power Supply:

Corsair CX430M ATX 430 watts modular

 

Motherboard:

Gigabyte GA-F2A85XM-D3H Micro-ATX

 

Processor:

AMD A8-5600K Quad Core APU

 

Video Card:

Sapphire AMD R7 360 2GB DDR5 VRAM

 

Memory:

2 X 8 GB Crucial Ballistix Sport Low Profile DDR3 1600

 

Optical Drive:

Samsung SH-2224DB/BEBE SATA DVD/RW

 

Hard Drive:

Toshiba DT01ACA100 1 TB SATA 6GB/sec SATA 3

 

Solid State Drive:

Toshiba HDTS212XZSTA 128GB SATA 3

 

Wireless Adapter:

TP-Link TL-WN881ND N300 PCI-e internal

 

Operating System:

Linux Mint 17.3 Cinnamon 64 bit

 

My processor is 2012 AMD "Trinity" technology - a bit trailing edge but Linux always works best with less than bleeding edge hardware. For a few years I used the APU for video but last year I upgraded to a discrete AMD video card - the grandkids love it for Web based Hot Wheels games. The solid state drive means it flies and I have lots of storage space on the regular hard drive. The cooling fans and case keep everything cool. The wireless adapter was specially chosen to work with Linux - my machine is in a basement office and the wifi router is upstairs. It's a powerful system that I expect will last a long time.






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