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My Ongoing Linux Adventure.


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#1 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 09:39 AM

First of all, even though I have been enjoying my Linux experience, I also like (love) Windows 10. I feel very comfortable with the file manager within Windows 10, and there are a couple of software tools that I prefer over a similar Linux tool. But...

 

I began with Linux almost a year ago when I decided to try Linux Mint on a lark. It was easy to install in a dual boot with Windows, and it was easy to use and perform many of my everyday computer needs with. But Linux Mint was just too much like Windows, it was not very challenging. I installed Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.2 then 17.3, but I never did catch the Linux bug until...

 

I installed Ubuntu. I absolutely love Ubuntu. My first experience with Ubuntu didn't work out too well, I tried Ubuntu Studio 14.04, and things just didn't go too well so I completely uninstalled it after a few weeks of frustration. But by that time I had already caught the Ubuntu bug, so I decided to try out Ubuntu 15.10. Man I love this OS. It is not like Linux Mint, it is more challenging and less straight forward. So now I want to "road test" more distros to see what all the hub bub is about.

 

My Ubuntu desktop;

 

Workspace%201_006_zpswgl4olly.png

 

I have a few different drives installed in my computer via SATA3 interconnects; I have 1 SSD devoted to Windows 10, one SSD that is currently hosting Linux Mint 17.3, and a one 1 tb HDD that has Ubuntu on it. But I see my friend's wizardfromoz partitioning and I get jealous.

 

Selection_010_zpsvrm721fo.png

 

 

 

 

I mean, I thought that there was a limit to the amount of partitions that a drive could hold, how does the wizard get so many partitions into one drive? Here is my 1 tb hard drive;

 

Workspace%201_007_zpsc8jidcgf.png

 

I would like to create a couple more partitions, but I have been having issues with that. It seems that sometimes I can't even format an already existing partition, like on my SSD;

 

Workspace%201_008_zpspkfy6pkf.png

 

There is an unallocated partition that I have been trying to format, but somehow I have been running into issues.

 

As you can see I am currently trying elementary OS, I am trying out the freya build. It is different and interesting but there are a couple of different distros that I would like to try. The next I would like to install is Korora 22, but the installation did not go to well. I will try again.

 

So to wrap up this long and winding thread, I guess I need guidance on some partitioning issues. I am having fun with my ongoing Linux adventure, but I am a newbie so please be gentle when you give me advice.


Edited by Chris Cosgrove, 28 January 2016 - 06:46 PM.
Topic title edited at OP's request.

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#2 mremski

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 10:02 AM

"Old type partitions" vs "new fancy type partitions".

Old DOS/Windows:  4 primary partitions, then you had extended partions.

New style:  GPARTD, similar to the way Apple and others have been doing things.

 

Your BIOS needs to know or be able to figure out enough to know where to boot.  Lots of embedded magic in there (Master Boot Record).  Booting a PC a lot happens between power on and a login screen.  Most of it is "take one step, learn a little bit more, take another step, learn some more".

 

I'll leave Wiz and others to help you set up the different partitions, but a basic thing is you can run a fairly complete Linux distribution in not a lot of space.  50GB is way more than enough, 32GB is fine.  So divide 1TB by 50 GB and thats what you can do.


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#3 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 10:22 AM

Thanks. I am still learning so I appreciate the info. I have to figure this whole gparted thing out.


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#4 Gary R

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 11:17 AM

Best tutorial I've read for GParted is this one ...

 

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/gparted.html

 

The same guy has also written some tutorials on GRUB 1 and GRUB 2 that are highly informative as well ...

 

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/grub.html

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/grub-2.html

 

 

Please note the dates that those articles were written though, as there may be changes in the later iterations of both GRUB and GParted.


Edited by Gary R, 27 January 2016 - 11:23 AM.


#5 DeimosChaos

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 11:25 AM

Welcome to Ubuntu! It is typically my main distro on all my machines. I have tried lots of different ones, but always came back to Ubuntu for one reason or another (typically it was because my hardware seemed to run better on it).

 

As mremski stated you will need to change your partition table from MBR (Master Boot Record) to GPT (GUID Partition Table). GPT supports up to 128 primary partitions. I want to say you have to reformat your drive if you want to switch to GPT (haven't played with this in a while)... so that would require wiping the entire thing (which could be a pain since you have Windows on there as well).

 

I would suggest getting a second drive and using that as your play area. Keep Windows and your main Linux distro on your primary drive, then use the second one for installing any new distros you want to play with.


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#6 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 11:54 AM

Welcome to Ubuntu! It is typically my main distro on all my machines. I have tried lots of different ones, but always came back to Ubuntu for one reason or another (typically it was because my hardware seemed to run better on it).

 

As mremski stated you will need to change your partition table from MBR (Master Boot Record) to GPT (GUID Partition Table). GPT supports up to 128 primary partitions. I want to say you have to reformat your drive if you want to switch to GPT (haven't played with this in a while)... so that would require wiping the entire thing (which could be a pain since you have Windows on there as well).

 

I would suggest getting a second drive and using that as your play area. Keep Windows and your main Linux distro on your primary drive, then use the second one for installing any new distros you want to play with.

 

 

I have three separate drive right now, I have pictures of a couple of my drives in post number 1 above. I have one little SSD just for Windows 10 and the rest of my drives I am using to play with.


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#7 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 12:11 PM

I have spent the last hour trying to install this stupid Korora and it still did not work. Maybe I have a bad ISO image or something, but I have no errors playing with the live disk, it just doesn't go through the installation at all. It stops on the second screen on picking my equipment, it just does not progress beyond that. It is based on Fedora, so I don't know much about that either. Right now I am downloading Black Lab to give that a spin around the block.


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#8 DeimosChaos

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 12:44 PM

 

I have three separate drive right now, I have pictures of a couple of my drives in post number 1 above. I have one little SSD just for Windows 10 and the rest of my drives I am using to play with.

 

That is my bad. I didn't pay close enough attention to your screen in the first post.

 

I have spent the last hour trying to install this stupid Korora and it still did not work. Maybe I have a bad ISO image or something, but I have no errors playing with the live disk, it just doesn't go through the installation at all. It stops on the second screen on picking my equipment, it just does not progress beyond that. It is based on Fedora, so I don't know much about that either. Right now I am downloading Black Lab to give that a spin around the block.

I have had similar things like this happen when trying to install... I usually just chalked it up to that distro doesn't like my hardware and moved on and tried something different.


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#9 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 01:33 AM

It seems that sometimes I can't even format an already existing partition, like on my SSD

Make sure the partition isn't mounted. For example, in Gparted, mounted partitions display a key icon. In Gparted, you can unmount partitions via the right-click menu.

#10 wizardfromoz

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 04:33 AM

 

In Gparted, you can unmount partitions via the right-click menu.

 

 

Except, when you are in the active partition. If you are lucky, you will get a message such as below:

 

 

BueDsg7.png

 

The above taken from Manjaro 15-12, which I haven't updated since I installed a couple of hours ago, so doesn't matter if I trash it, lol.

 

If you are NOT so lucky, you can trash your install. GParted is best used either from:

  1. Another Linux Distribution preferably on another drive, or at least (as it must be) on another Partition
  2. From a GParted LIve cd/dvd (will fit on a CD)
  3. From a Live Linux (install) disk/usb that will likely contain GParted or
  4. From Windows if you are a dual-booter. GParted is cross-platform, and so can be installed on Windows, providing, for the most part, more flexibility than Windows Disk Management Tool

 

Hi Rocky, felt my ears burning so swung by. I am now subscribed.

 

In your case, with you running two (2) SSDs each with a Linux, and a 1TB HDD running Windows, you simply perform the GParted voodoo on one of the two that you are not on. Easy peasy.

 

Mate, this might be a good time for you to perform a couple of small exercises that will tell us about your underlying file structure in your three drives. If you have already done so, my bad and fast-track me to where the info is..

 

1. First up, take a look at this Post at a Topic by tamimwm, here - http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/598939/minor-issues-with-linux-mint-173/?p=3883910 - and then

 

2. COMBINE that with advice I gave to jargos at http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/588870/dual-booting-linux-alongside-win-7/?p=3816049  and use the instructions from the latter with the guide of the Windows Disk Management screenshot in the former (your figures and storage and Partitions will be different).

 

Sorry but haven't got a Windows machine running currently!

 

Bottomline is to tell us whether any of your SSDs and HDD are GPT formatted and/or ms-dos/MBR formatted?

 

Once we get that info we can proceed with more options.

 

Likewise in your Linux Distro partitions, you can use the command

parted -l 

... that's an "el" not a "one"

 

and get the Linux info.

 

Mine looks like this:

 

AX5fh8N.png

 

Cheers

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#11 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 06:32 AM

Thanks wizard for all of that information. Here is the first little bit of information that I have, I will work on getting some more later.

 

mmc_2016-01-28_04-28-11_zpsw2vymhto.png


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#12 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 06:38 AM

I am trying to do step number 2 from your post #10 in this thread, (I followed your link to the other thread) but I do not see a tab called volume.

 

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#13 wizardfromoz

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 03:32 PM

My bad - Disk Management remained basically identical through Windows 7 and Windows 8 - they must have changed it Windows 10 - Murphy's Law, lol.

 

I'll do a little research and be back!

 

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#14 wizardfromoz

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 05:34 PM

Got it, I think.

 

Close down your Properties window. In Disk Management choose View from the menu. You will have choices of Top and Bottom.

 

Mouse over Top and you will see you are on Volume List currently. Change that to Disk List.

 

If you have the option with Bottom, change that to Graphical List.

 

Now you can see "Disk 0" in both panes. Right click on either, choose Properties, then Volumes, and report what you find.

 

Another tool of use to you is Diskpart, run from the command line. If you want to try it:

  1. Press and hold your Windows key (called the Super key under Linux) and while holding press the letter R, will bring up a small window with a blinking prompt
  2. type and enter diskpart - you will get a warning asking whether you want to allow the program to make changes to your computer?
  3. Choose Yes (although we aren't changing anything), you will go into a Terminal session
  4. type and enter "list disk"

There will be a header to the right saying GPT - if there is nothing under it beside your Disk 0 (your 1TB drive), you are on MBR. If there is an asterisk (*) it is GPT

 

Mine on the Asus running Windows 7 looks as below:

 

59nFUAr.png

 

Even though drives 1TB and larger are eminently suited to GPT, mine is MBR - which is an annoyance but I can change that down the track.

 

See how you go?

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#15 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 05:58 PM

Mine doesn'tfirefox_2016-01-28_15-56-16_zpsdqgazwx1. look anything like that. Here is a screen capture of my disc 0 volume;


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png





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