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Windows 10 Unsafe Filesystem-Can not start or mount


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#1 Dalvik

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 04:05 AM

Hi all,

 

I have a computer with Windows 10 and Ubuntu 14 installed. Originally, I had Windows 7, but I took a chance with the free upgrade for Win 10 some months ago, and have gradually began to use it exclusively.

 

But I had a problem this week. While shutting down, the computer apparently hang (it still showed a mouse icon from the game I had been playing) and stood there for several minutes, so I forced it to power off by pressing the button continuously.

The next time I tried to start, I could go to the login screen, select my username and password but then the computer stayed there for several minutes with the waiting icon and failed to go anywhere. So I powered it off again.

 

I went to linux and tried to mount the Windows filesystem. I could do it only in Readonly mode, and so I could copy MOST of my data. The one folder I could not was an encrypted folder: the data is apparently all there, but Linux can not access it because it is encrypted. And because this is important, I would like to recover Win10 to access it with the proper key.

 

I logged into windows on recovery mode, and chose the command line recovery. Here I was able to run chkdsk with correcting errors.

Still could not get in.

 

What I noticed is that if I first mount /windows as readonly from Linux, then restart and try to log in to  Win10, I can actually get to the desktop and open explorer, but I am not able to do much else: I can not copy files, open the context menu, I can not open the command line and so far I have not been able to open Control panel.

 

So, I'd like to know, is it still possible to recover my Win10?

 

Thank you.

 

 



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#2 usasma

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 07:29 AM

Were you able to copy the file while in the Command Prompt?

Other options are to use the repair options in Startup Repair.

You may have to go as far at to Reset (with the Keep My Files option - NOT with the Remove Everything option)

 

I don't know much about encryption - but this series of posts seems to address your issues:  http://security.stackexchange.com/questions/7408/how-can-i-recover-encrypted-files-after-system-reinstallation


Edited by usasma, 27 January 2016 - 07:31 AM.

My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#3 Niweg

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 09:48 AM

 Usasma's suggestion to do a repair is what I'd try.  If you don't have an install or repair disc, you can make a repair disc via Control Panel -> Backup and Restore -> Create a system repair disc. 

 

 When you've gotten your system back like you want it, I urge you to get yourself an external hard drive and a good 3rd party backup program. You can set it up to do everything automagically at the time and frequency of your choice. 1 TB external hard drives are about $50 these days and a really good FREE backup program is the Easeus Todo Backup Free.  That can save you a lot of time and frustration the next time something like this happens. Sooner or later it happens to all computers for one reason or another.
 
 Good luck.

Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#4 Dalvik

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 02:16 PM

Hi Usasma and Niweg. Thank you both.

To address each of you, while in the command prompt I could not access the encrypted files. This was via the recovery start up so I was not in the normal operating system. Instead, I had a recovery command prompt with some recovery tools, but I have no idea what to do there.

 

Usasma, could you give more details on how to access Startup Repair please?

 

@Niweg: I can not open Control Panel unfortunately. I do have an external disk which I use for my backups. I do them manually, and had done one one or two weeks before. What I did not notice is that in copying the encrypted folder it does not decrypt it. Which means that I either have: the whole structure and file names but files that can not be read and are stopped by the anti-virus; or a structure that copies the directories and only the unencrypted files that it finds there.

 

Thank you for the backup suggestion. I do need an automated tool, and am tired of using manual procedures. In Linux, I used rsync and was very happy with it, by the way.



#5 usasma

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 05:34 PM

If you get to the login screen, there's a little power icon in the lower right corner there.

Hold down the SHIFT key while you click on the Power icon and select "Restart"

Continue to hold the SHIFT key and the system will boot to Startup Repair

 

There's lot's of other ways to do this:  https://www.google.com/search?q=boot+to+startup+repair&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8


My browser caused a flood of traffic, sio my IP address was banned. Hope to fix it soon. Will get back to posting as soon as Im able.

- John  (my website: http://www.carrona.org/ )**If you need a more detailed explanation, please ask for it. I have the Knack. **  If I haven't replied in 48 hours, please send me a message. My eye problems have recently increased and I'm having difficult reading posts. (23 Nov 2017)FYI - I am completely blind in the right eye and ~30% blind in the left eye.<p>If the eye problems get worse suddenly, I may not be able to respond.If that's the case and help is needed, please PM a staff member for assistance.

#6 Curly56

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Posted 20 February 2016 - 09:30 AM

I occasionally run Ubuntu too from a USB stick, and had some similar problems. So before I change the system I always power down completely for a minute, because after a restart there still might be remnants of the other system in the RAM causing problems.

If you shut down Win10 with the power switch, it seems to use the hibernation file, leaving the HD in an instable condition, and it cannot be accessed from Ubuntu anymore; so either use the shutdown menu, or even better "run" and C:\Windows\System32\shutdown.exe -s -t 00     (you can also create a link on the desktop with that cmd-line) especially if you want to reboot afterwards into Ubuntu.

I do not use the hibernation mode, so I disabled it completely:

At an elevated cmd-prompt type powercfg -h off  (on to turn it back on)

Greetings from Germany

Curly






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