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Building My First PC(powerful)


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#1 jediderek

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 08:00 PM

Hey guys, this will be my first pc I will build. My plan is to build a pretty powerful machine that will last me more than a couple years. I need some help just verifying the items that I picked out are good quality and that nothing would fall apart on me, I used pc part picker to help with this.

Along with that question, I was wondering are all these the parts I need? I'm assuming the motherboard produces the sound(with speakers hooked up to it ofcourse) and it would have the network card too? Or do I need to buy these separately? Thanks!

Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler
Asus Z97-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard
G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory
Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive
Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive
EVGA GeForce GTX 960 2GB SuperSC ACX 2.0+ Video Card
Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case
EVGA 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply



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#2 Ram4x4

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 08:26 PM

Those are decent parts.

 

I'm going to assume, based on your picks, that you're looking to game?

 

If so, drop that 960, spend the extra $100 and get a 970.  A single 960 is OK for relatively non intensive games, like World of Warcraft, but if you intend to play any of the more modern, serious games, you'll wish you had bought the 970.

 

Also, you didn't specify what resolution you wanted to run at...1080P?  4K?

 

If going above 1920x1080, then the 970 is all the more needed.  The 960 you picked is only 2GB of vid ram.  That will be an achilles heel above 1080P resolutions.  The 970's are all 4GB of memory and hardware specs-wise are twice the card of the 960.

 

If you do decide to go with a 970, I'd bump your PSU up to the 600-650 watt range too.  The 500 will probably run everything with a 970, but a 600-650 watt will give more overhead (you won't be running the PSU as hard).

 

I see no reason that system won't last a while, however, just be aware, now that the Skylake chips are out (I7-6700K) and they use the new LGA1151 socket, all the LGA1150 stuff is basically on the way out.  That doesn't mean it'll be gone tomorrow, just be aware the architecture has changed with a new socket, chipset, etc.

 

Current benchmarks of the new 6700K don't show any appreciable gain over the 4790K in terms of gaming, but the new chipset offers some advantages and future proofing.



#3 jediderek

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 08:30 PM

Those are decent parts.

 

I'm going to assume, based on your picks, that you're looking to game?

 

If so, drop that 960, spend the extra $100 and get a 970.  A single 960 is OK for relatively non intensive games, like World of Warcraft, but if you intend to play any of the more modern, serious games, you'll wish you had bought the 970.

 

Also, you didn't specify what resolution you wanted to run at...1080P?  4K?

 

If going above 1920x1080, then the 970 is all the more needed.  The 960 you picked is only 2GB of vid ram.  That will be an achilles heel above 1080P resolutions.  The 970's are all 4GB of memory and hardware specs-wise are twice the card of the 960.

 

If you do decide to go with a 970, I'd bump your PSU up to the 600-650 watt range too.  The 500 will probably run everything with a 970, but a 600-650 watt will give more overhead (you won't be running the PSU as hard).

 

I see no reason that system won't last a while, however, just be aware, now that the Skylake chips are out (I7-6700K) and they use the new LGA1151 socket, all the LGA1150 stuff is basically on the way out.  That doesn't mean it'll be gone tomorrow, just be aware the architecture has changed with a new socket, chipset, etc.

 

Current benchmarks of the new 6700K don't show any appreciable gain over the 4790K in terms of gaming, but the new chipset offers some advantages and future proofing.

I did look into the 6700k processor, but like you said, the 4790k benchmarked a lot better, if you don't mind me asking, what are the advantages of the 6900k? I don't know much about sockets.



#4 Ram4x4

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 09:08 PM

I'd say the 4790K and 6700K are almost neck and neck in benchmarks...

 

Either way, the new Skylake CPU's are also paired with a new chipset...the Z170.

 

The Z170 provides:

 

1. A faster connection between the chipset and the CPU (DMI 3.0 vs 2.0). 

2. Support for 20 PCI-E 3.0 lanes vs 8 PCI-E 2.0 lanes on Z97 (can support USB 3.1, onboard wifi, Thunderbolt and up to three x4 M.2 PCI-E 3.0 ports).

3. DDR4 support

4. More USB 3.0 ports

5. PCI-E 3.0 support for M.2 devices.

 

M.2 PCI SSD's are starting to get popular.  Still a little pricey, but if you have M.2 that supports PCI-E 3.0, when those drives get a little cheaper, they are 4-5 times faster than SATA based SSD's are now.  Instead of 525MB/s, think 2200-2500 MB/s.

 

DDR4 is also the new standard for memory.  It allows for more density so down the road adding 64GB of memory to your board isn't out of the question.

 

So, it's not so much the 6700K CPU itself that's important (I expect newer Skylake I7's to come along as the new speed king).  The Z170 chipset is redefining the standard for connectivity of devices and speed of those devices.  It's "more future proof" than the Z97 is.



#5 jediderek

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Posted 26 January 2016 - 01:12 AM

I'd say the 4790K and 6700K are almost neck and neck in benchmarks...

 

Either way, the new Skylake CPU's are also paired with a new chipset...the Z170.

 

The Z170 provides:

 

1. A faster connection between the chipset and the CPU (DMI 3.0 vs 2.0). 

2. Support for 20 PCI-E 3.0 lanes vs 8 PCI-E 2.0 lanes on Z97 (can support USB 3.1, onboard wifi, Thunderbolt and up to three x4 M.2 PCI-E 3.0 ports).

3. DDR4 support

4. More USB 3.0 ports

5. PCI-E 3.0 support for M.2 devices.

 

M.2 PCI SSD's are starting to get popular.  Still a little pricey, but if you have M.2 that supports PCI-E 3.0, when those drives get a little cheaper, they are 4-5 times faster than SATA based SSD's are now.  Instead of 525MB/s, think 2200-2500 MB/s.

 

DDR4 is also the new standard for memory.  It allows for more density so down the road adding 64GB of memory to your board isn't out of the question.

 

So, it's not so much the 6700K CPU itself that's important (I expect newer Skylake I7's to come along as the new speed king).  The Z170 chipset is redefining the standard for connectivity of devices and speed of those devices.  It's "more future proof" than the Z97 is.

Wow thats a lot of good information, thanks for sharing about the differences between processors besides their benchmarks.






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