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Linux distro easy usability, basic user


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#1 Clade

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 07:30 AM

Hi everyone!
 
Sorry for my English. . . It is not my official language. .
 
I imagine that here is a good place to take some questions because I know little about the Linux OS:
 
Note: The first distro Linux I used was Zorin 9 and found it quite interesting, even when some commands to update after work sometimes, began reporting errors in updating the OS. I liked because it looks like the Windows usability.
 
Installed in dual boot with Windows 8.1 - 64 on equipment Dell Inspiron N4030, 3 GB of RAM, the difference was visible, the way both system behaved in the same equipment. Linux super light, soft. . . Windows already, not much.
 
I think that at least 90% of equipment users to see, whether Linux, Windows ,. . . do not know circumvent difficulties, however simple they may seem, and that, perhaps, may appear on the SO therefore does not have the necessary knowledge to do so.
 
Linux, to my knowledge, the operations are performed by commands via prompt, than Windows, which for those with little knowledge, this is unthinkable.
 
As the equipment mentioned above burned the motherboard, not being viable and its repair on the above and in order to inform people with little or no knowledge of OS on the Linux option, ask:
 
. What other Linux distro you suggest, ease, usability ... and that come closest to the Windows visual?
 
. Other recommendations it deems to be relevant to what is stated.
 
Thanks for your attention!
 
Clade


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#2 jargos

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 08:48 AM

Hi Clade, and welcome.

 

I use Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.3.

 

And I find it fantastic, easy to use, and in fact, similar in many ways to Windows XP and 7 - not that that was a prerequisite for me, but that's what I observed.

 

No, Linux is not just by command (terminal). Yes, it is readily available, but for us (well, me) dummies, it has a brilliant menu that I have found far better, intuitive and more logical that any of Windows menus.

 

So good luck with it all, and I hope you give it a go. There are many folk here much more capable than I, that will be happy to help you.


Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon on older, Pentium 4 desktop.

Win 7 on Medion Akoya i3 laptop


#3 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 09:06 AM

I second that you try Linux Mint 17.3;

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#4 Clade

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 04:06 PM

Hi Clade, and welcome.

 

I use Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.3.

 

And I find it fantastic, easy to use, and in fact, similar in many ways to Windows XP and 7 - not that that was a prerequisite for me, but that's what I observed.

 

No, Linux is not just by command (terminal). Yes, it is readily available, but for us (well, me) dummies, it has a brilliant menu that I have found far better, intuitive and more logical that any of Windows menus.

 

So good luck with it all, and I hope you give it a go. There are many folk here much more capable than I, that will be happy to help you.

 

Hi Jargos!
 
I was following your post, but only today that I read in more detail and then I thought of "hitchhike" on it.
Opportunely, so finding a used notebook, I will return again to test Linux.
 
Thanks for your availability and I'm happy for your good adaptation to Linux
 

 

I second that you try Linux Mint 17.3;

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/

 

Thanks Rocky Benett!

 

I appreciate your answer.
 
 


#5 MadmanRB

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 05:16 PM

The main reason why most linux guides and instructions use command line is that unlike in windows where you are locked down to one user interface linux has many, this is both a good and a bad thing.

On one hand linux unlike windows gives you choice, if you dont like something you can change it and make it your own.

The windows approach is if you dont like something, though crap.

Linux is very diverse so as a compensation command line is used as the linux universal language of getting things done.

Pretty much all distros share the same commands overall with only a few things here and there that make them different such as the command to install a package iis different for arch and Ubuntu but overall in the end they still use the same base commands,

really the only time linux becomes complex is the sheer amount of distros that all have something they do differently from eachother.

But again linux is great because of this, if you dont like something in distro a you can try distro b.

In windows you dont have this option, its either use what you have now or try one of the other versions that may not work with your hardware.

Linux does have this issue as well but some distros do serve something for hardware support and you are not limited on your options,


Edited by MadmanRB, 23 January 2016 - 05:17 PM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

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#6 wizardfromoz

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 06:16 PM

Hi Clade and :welcome: to the Linux side of the Forum.

:thumbup2: to all of the above.

 

If you are considering Linux Mint, there are a number of different desktops to choose from. These include Cinnamon, MATE (pron. "mar-tay", Spanish), Xfce (x-f-c-e) and KDE.

 

You might read this article here -

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/mint

 

MATE was my introduction to Linux Mint, I found it (and still do) excellent, but the choice is yours. The article does not feature a screenshot of KDE, but pcpunk might show you one of his with a menu open.

 

I use Zorin OS9 on another computer, and found it very good coming from Windows 7.

 

My current setup looks as follows:

 

hKallqS.png

 

... and I will be adding to it today. I don't usually use linux-swap, but just installed it yesterday to see if it remedied a sluggish performance for Ubuntu MATE 15.10. For me it makes little difference except at startup and shutdown/reboot.

 

However in your case, with 3GB of RAM, it may be useful. I note from your PC specs on Google, that you likely have a 320GB hard drive, a DVD writer, and 64-bit architecture. Perhaps you have 2 USB ports, are they available or in use?

 

Depending on the availability to you of USB sticks where you live (looks like mid-Atlantic, by the time zone), I would try a number of different Linux distributions (Distros) under a Live scenario using USB sticks or CD/DVD. Rewritable CDs or DVDs can be used under Live, and then you can use them again.

 

Good luck and enjoy Linux

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#7 jargos

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 08:39 PM

 

Hi Clade, and welcome.

 

I use Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.3.

 

And I find it fantastic, easy to use, and in fact, similar in many ways to Windows XP and 7 - not that that was a prerequisite for me, but that's what I observed.

 

No, Linux is not just by command (terminal). Yes, it is readily available, but for us (well, me) dummies, it has a brilliant menu that I have found far better, intuitive and more logical that any of Windows menus.

 

So good luck with it all, and I hope you give it a go. There are many folk here much more capable than I, that will be happy to help you.

 

Hi Jargos!
 
I was following your post, but only today that I read in more detail and then I thought of "hitchhike" on it.
Opportunely, so finding a used notebook, I will return again to test Linux.
 
Thanks for your availability and I'm happy for your good adaptation to Linux
 

 

I second that you try Linux Mint 17.3;

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/

 

Thanks Rocky Benett!

 

I appreciate your answer.
 
 

 

 

Hi Clade. By 'finding a used notebook', I assume you mean you are going to single install Linux on one machine. That, may I say, is a great idea - well, it was for me, anyway, as I was too 'dumb' to do the dual boot thing.

 

I'm glad you perused (hitchhike) my other thread as there is some good info there.

 

At the end of the day, Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.3 is a great, stand alone operating system that does everything I would ever want, and way way more if I ever wanted.

 

And surprisingly, it was really easy to install and it took me only a couple of hours to become familiar with it, and only a couple of days to be doing ALL my work on it. Wait until you see all the brilliant free software, such as LibreOffice.

 

Once you get it going, you may well feel like I did - and that is, that you stepped out of servitude (MSFT) into the sweet air of freedom (Linux).

 

Cheers

 

JA


Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon on older, Pentium 4 desktop.

Win 7 on Medion Akoya i3 laptop


#8 wizardfromoz

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 11:59 PM

:thumbup2: to what both jargos and Rocky Bennett. Both of these gentlemen are contemporary with me, not only in age, but in labouring under Windows for 20+ years.

 

@Clade:

 

At the risk of confusing you with choices, Wikipedia have a page here -

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightweight_Linux_distribution

 

... which may be of use to you to try some different Distros Live (via CD/DVD or USB stick) before installing. The sizes listed there will also give you an idea of what medium to "burn" to eg CD, DVD or USB stick.

 

Any of those listed will probably "get up & fly" under 3GB RAM, but they may also interest you in some of their heavyweight cousins.

 

Just a thought.

 

:wizardball: Wizard - Linux ... open your mind, not your wallet



#9 Clade

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 04:12 AM

The main reason why most linux guides and instructions use command line is that unlike in windows where you are locked down to one user interface linux has many, this is both a good and a bad thing.

On one hand linux unlike windows gives you choice, if you dont like something you can change it and make it your own.

The windows approach is if you dont like something, though crap.

Linux is very diverse so as a compensation command line is used as the linux universal language of getting things done.

Pretty much all distros share the same commands overall with only a few things here and there that make them different such as the command to install a package iis different for arch and Ubuntu but overall in the end they still use the same base commands,

really the only time linux becomes complex is the sheer amount of distros that all have something they do differently from eachother.

But again linux is great because of this, if you dont like something in distro a you can try distro b.

In windows you dont have this option, its either use what you have now or try one of the other versions that may not work with your hardware.

Linux does have this issue as well but some distros do serve something for hardware support and you are not limited on your options,

 

 

Hi Clade and :welcome: to the Linux side of the Forum.

:thumbup2: to all of the above.

 

If you are considering Linux Mint, there are a number of different desktops to choose from. These include Cinnamon, MATE (pron. "mar-tay", Spanish), Xfce (x-f-c-e) and KDE.

 

You might read this article here -

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/mint

 

Excellent link. Create bookmarks folder specifically for Linux-related issues

 

MATE was my introduction to Linux Mint, I found it (and still do) excellent, but the choice is yours. The article does not feature a screenshot of KDE, but pcpunk might show you one of his with a menu open.

 

I use Zorin OS9 on another computer, and found it very good coming from Windows 7.

 

My current setup looks as follows:

 

hKallqS.png

 

Uau! Distro diversity!

 

 

... and I will be adding to it today. I don't usually use linux-swap, but just installed it yesterday to see if it remedied a sluggish performance for Ubuntu MATE 15.10. For me it makes little difference except at startup and shutdown/reboot.

 

However in your case, with 3GB of RAM, it may be useful. I note from your PC specs on Google, that you likely have a 320GB hard drive, a DVD writer, and 64-bit architecture. Perhaps you have 2 USB ports, are they available or in use?

 

No! the equipment is broken and not worth fix it. I'll see if I can get a used equipment and fully use it only with tests for different distros.

 

Thanks for your explanation!

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Clade, and welcome.

 

I use Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.3.

 

And I find it fantastic, easy to use, and in fact, similar in many ways to Windows XP and 7 - not that that was a prerequisite for me, but that's what I observed.

 

No, Linux is not just by command (terminal). Yes, it is readily available, but for us (well, me) dummies, it has a brilliant menu that I have found far better, intuitive and more logical that any of Windows menus.

 

So good luck with it all, and I hope you give it a go. There are many folk here much more capable than I, that will be happy to help you.

 

Hi Jargos!
 
I was following your post, but only today that I read in more detail and then I thought of "hitchhike" on it.
Opportunely, so finding a used notebook, I will return again to test Linux.
 
Thanks for your availability and I'm happy for your good adaptation to Linux
 

 

I second that you try Linux Mint 17.3;

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/

 

Thanks Rocky Benett!

 

I appreciate your answer.
 
 

 

 

Hi Clade. By 'finding a used notebook', I assume you mean you are going to single install Linux on one machine. That, may I say, is a great idea - well, it was for me, anyway, as I was too 'dumb' to do the dual boot thing.

 

Yeah! I'll get a used equipment and test the different distros and see those that meet the objectives

 

I'm glad you perused (hitchhike) my other thread as there is some good info there.

 

At the end of the day, Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.3 is a great, stand alone operating system that does everything I would ever want, and way way more if I ever wanted.

 

This early hours I put on a bootable flash drive the distro Mint 17.3 Cinnamom that had fallen on 23 December.

 

And surprisingly, it was really easy to install and it took me only a couple of hours to become familiar with it, and only a couple of days to be doing ALL my work on it. Wait until you see all the brilliant free software, such as LibreOffice.

 

 

:thumbup2: to what both jargos and Rocky Bennett. Both of these gentlemen are contemporary with me, not only in age, but in labouring under Windows for 20+ years.

 

@Clade:

 

At the risk of confusing you with choices, Wikipedia have a page here -

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightweight_Linux_distribution

 

Interesting

 

... which may be of use to you to try some different Distros Live (via CD/DVD or USB stick) before installing. The sizes listed there will also give you an idea of what medium to "burn" to eg CD, DVD or USB stick.

 

Yes, I'll take your suggestion and so I will testing the different distro.

 

Any of those listed will probably "get up & fly" under 3GB RAM, but they may also interest you in some of their heavyweight cousins.

 

Just a thought.

 

:wizardball: Wizard - Linux ... open your mind, not your wallet

 

 

Once you get it going, you may well feel like I did - and that is, that you stepped out of servitude (MSFT) into the sweet air of freedom (Linux).

 

Cheers

 

JA

 



#10 pcpunk

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 01:49 PM

Hi everyone!

 
Linux, to my knowledge, the operations are performed by commands via prompt, than Windows, which for those with little knowledge, this is unthinkable.

I think maybe Linux has changed a little since you used it, and/or maybe were a little misinformed.  You don't have to use the Terminal for most things, and there are many free packages available(Virus Free)in the Software Manager.  And there is a huge community that will help along with googling for simple Terminal actions.  Updates are shown automatically for most, and all one needs to do is click on the Update Icon, enter password and click to Install Updates.

 

As the equipment mentioned above burned the motherboard, not being viable and its repair on the above and in order to inform people with little or no knowledge of OS on the Linux option, ask:

 
. What other Linux distro you suggest, ease, usability ... and that come closest to the Windows visual?
 
. Other recommendations it deems to be relevant to what is stated.

I hope you don't think Linux "burned the motherboard" I find that a little strange.

 

As for some really good "Distro's" (Operating System Term in Linux), I would suggest any of these for a beginner as they are very stable, easy to use and have a huge user base.

 

As The Wizard suggested, choose one of the Titles: "Cinnamon" "Mate" "KDE" or "Xfce" of the 64bit variety for your pc.

http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

Here is an article on LinuxMint Distro's

https://www.linux.com/learn/tutorials/835065-linux-mint-171-simplicity-at-its-best

 

Or of the Ubuntu Flavor

 

http://www.ubuntu.com/about/about-ubuntu/flavours

 

If you have any questions as how to run this Live (for a testdrive) just post back.

 

pcpunk


Edited by pcpunk, 24 January 2016 - 01:52 PM.

sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

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#11 Clade

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 03:57 PM

 

Hi everyone!

 
Linux, to my knowledge, the operations are performed by commands via prompt, than Windows, which for those with little knowledge, this is unthinkable.

I think maybe Linux has changed a little since you used it, and/or maybe were a little misinformed.  You don't have to use the Terminal for most things, and there are many free packages available(Virus Free)in the Software Manager.  And there is a huge community that will help along with googling for simple Terminal actions.  Updates are shown automatically for most, and all one needs to do is click on the Update Icon, enter password and click to Install Updates.

 

I used the distro Zorin 9 briefly. The equipment it crashed. As reported above, super lightweight and easy for work. . . compared to OS 8.1 that were with him in dual boot.

 

As the equipment mentioned above burned the motherboard, not being viable and its repair on the above and in order to inform people with little or no knowledge of OS on the Linux option, ask:

 
 

I hope you don't think Linux "burned the motherboard" I find that a little strange.

 

No. There were no operating systems, Linux and Windows that made the motherboard burned. Did a little research and some Dell models suffer from this problem.

 

As for some really good "Distro's" (Operating System Term in Linux), I would suggest any of these for a beginner as they are very stable, easy to use and have a huge user base.

 

As The Wizard suggested, choose one of the Titles: "Cinnamon" "Mate" "KDE" or "Xfce" of the 64bit variety for your pc.

http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

Here is an article on LinuxMint Distro's

https://www.linux.com/learn/tutorials/835065-linux-mint-171-simplicity-at-its-best

 

Or of the Ubuntu Flavor

 

http://www.ubuntu.com/about/about-ubuntu/flavours

 

If you have any questions as how to run this Live (for a testdrive) just post back.

 

pcpunk

 

Thanks Pcpunk, I appreciate your consideration.



#12 dna9

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 11:41 AM

just try a plain distro of UBUNTU.  a good place to start.



#13 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 02:57 PM

just try a plain distro of UBUNTU.  a good place to start.

 

 

I agree with dna9. I love my Ubuntu.


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#14 NickAu

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 09:03 PM

 

My current setup looks as follows:

 

hKallqS.png

 

Right lets confuse a novice with all that.



#15 wizardfromoz

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 11:11 PM

@NickAu:

 

Oh, I don't know - even Novices have the right to be shown what is possible (cf Windows), I am sure you would agree?

 

Was it at

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/596465/10-bootable-linux-distros-on-hard-disk/

 

... where you said

 

 

Welcome to BC and Linux. Nice work.

 

... to Antilope7724, whom was running 10 distros?

 

Have a good Australia Day, Nick.

 

:wizardball: Wizard






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