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WiFi Connection shows full strength but no Internet connection


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#1 tonybmalone

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 07:35 AM

I have a Sony Vaio VGN-FZ430E that I've had for quite some years but it's my favorite laptop.

I recently retired this laptop from my office to my home. Now I'm having issues connecting to my home WiFi. The connection shows full strength but when I attempt to get on Google I'm getting "This webpage is not available ERR_CONNECTION_TIMED_OUT"

Sometimes when I click troubleshoot problems it will reset the network adapter and that works occasionally. Other times I get the default gateway is fixed. Other times I'm getting a duplicate IP address conflict. Please assist. Thanks

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#2 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 08:16 AM

Have you restarted your router?

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#3 tonybmalone

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 08:53 AM

Yes. Quite a few times. Sometimes it works and sometimes not. It seems that if I just keep reseting the network adapter and router it will work if I leave the laptop on for a while but as soon as it is restarted there is no connection.

#4 Ram4x4

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 09:59 PM

Is the connection set to auto connect?  Dupe IP address conflicts means there is another device inside your network with that IP.  I assume you are using DHCP from the router.  make sure range of available IP addresses is sufficient for the number of wifi devices you have.  Also check the lease time.  If the IP lease is set to an extremely long time, the IP address can be held even when that device is no linger connected and won't be available to use.  Can be an isue if your assignable IP range doesn't cover the total number of devices you have.


Edited by Ram4x4, 22 January 2016 - 10:01 PM.


#5 tonybmalone

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 07:22 PM

Thanks. But how would I check to see if these issues were my issue? I'm not fully sure how to check that information. 



#6 werearey

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 08:15 PM

Have you tried it in a different browser? Have you recently installed anything?



#7 tonybmalone

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 08:38 PM

Yes same issue will all browsers. No nothing new has been installed.



#8 werearey

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 08:42 PM

Try to ping 8.8.8.8 via cmd and see if you get a reply.



#9 Ram4x4

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 11:49 AM

What make/model is your router?  Every brand's interface is different.

 

If you check wifi connections in the system tray, you should see a list of available connections.  You can also see if any are set to auto connect.

 

99.99% of home routers default to DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol).  That means when you connect to your router, your PC is telling it "hey, I want to connect" and the router assigns it an IP address and allows it onto the network.  In the router configuration interface you can set a range of IP addresses...meaning you can tell the router to only allow X number of connections with a specific range of IP addresses, like 192.168.254.1 through 192.168.254.5, for example.  That means only 5 devices can connect at a time.

 

An IP lease, in basic terms, is the time period that IP is good for that device.  I typically set mine to 1 hour.  That means, if I disconnect a device, for 1 hour that IP is still "assigned" to that device.  If I reconnect to the router within 1 hour, it will get reassigned that same IP.  If the lease is set to extremely long periods, like days weeks or months, that IP could be tied up long after that device is disconnected.  If you combine the idea of the lease with a limited IP range, it is possible to run out of available IPs to assign, or you get the dupe errors you are seeing.

 

If a device is connected and running and the lease runs out, the router just renews the lease on the fly (you'll never notice it at all).

 

Another scenario is that your PC might be set to a "static" IP.  That is done on the PC itself in the network settings.  When it tries to connect to the router, it says "I want to connect and this is my IP" and it will always be the same.  If your router has handed out that IP via DHCP to another device, you get a dupe error since that IP is already in use.

 

Unless you are say, running a server inside your network, static IP's are not necessary.


Edited by Ram4x4, 24 January 2016 - 12:03 PM.


#10 Niweg

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 12:07 PM

 You could always try replacing the router if it's more than 2-3 years old.  Sometimes they seem to just quit working or start doing quirky things.  You can get a new one for around $30.  I've had to do that a few times over the last 20 years.  It seems funny to me that a solid state device with no moving parts would develop these quirks, but they sure seem to. 

 

 Good luck.


Make regular full system backups or you'll be sorry sooner or later.


#11 Ram4x4

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 12:50 PM

Typically the issues occur within any non-volatile solid state devices or chips in the particular equipment.  "Regular" memory, like RAM uses a capacitors (very tiny ones) that are directly connected to the circuit and rely on constant power to retain the data.  This type of chip has no real appreciable life cycle.

 

Some non-volatile types of memory (i.e. memory that retains data even when power is shut off) works differently.  It stores it's data in cells that are not directly connected to the circuit...they are insulated.  The values are changed by tunneling, or forcing electrons through the insulator with high voltages.  This tunneling, over time, breaks down the insulator and eventually you get electron leakage.  The cell either can't hold data or it won't cycle properly and eventually, the device won't work properly anymore.

 

SSD's are a good example.  Although the technology has come a long way and SSD's are warranted for nearly as long as mechanical drives, they too will wear out.  There are several methods used to help an SSD live longer.  One is to actually have more memory on the drive than it's rated capacity.  This allows the controller to utilize those extra cells as replacements for those that go bad over time.  Write mitigation can be done to force the drive to write to non-used cells instead of continually writing to the same cell.  This spreads out the wear factor across all the cells to maximize life span.



#12 tonybmalone

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 08:02 PM

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]
Copyright © 2009 Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.
 
C:\Users\Owner>ping 8.8.8.8
 
Pinging 8.8.8.8 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=21ms TTL=53
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=23ms TTL=53
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=25ms TTL=53
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=24ms TTL=53
 
Ping statistics for 8.8.8.8:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 21ms, Maximum = 25ms, Average = 23ms
 
It is working right now. I'm actually replying from the computer with the issues.

 

 

 

Try to ping 8.8.8.8 via cmd and see if you get a reply.



#13 tonybmalone

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 08:13 PM

What make/model is your router?  Every brand's interface is different.

 

If you check wifi connections in the system tray, you should see a list of available connections.  You can also see if any are set to auto connect.

 

99.99% of home routers default to DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol).  That means when you connect to your router, your PC is telling it "hey, I want to connect" and the router assigns it an IP address and allows it onto the network.  In the router configuration interface you can set a range of IP addresses...meaning you can tell the router to only allow X number of connections with a specific range of IP addresses, like 192.168.254.1 through 192.168.254.5, for example.  That means only 5 devices can connect at a time.

 

An IP lease, in basic terms, is the time period that IP is good for that device.  I typically set mine to 1 hour.  That means, if I disconnect a device, for 1 hour that IP is still "assigned" to that device.  If I reconnect to the router within 1 hour, it will get reassigned that same IP.  If the lease is set to extremely long periods, like days weeks or months, that IP could be tied up long after that device is disconnected.  If you combine the idea of the lease with a limited IP range, it is possible to run out of available IPs to assign, or you get the dupe errors you are seeing.

 

If a device is connected and running and the lease runs out, the router just renews the lease on the fly (you'll never notice it at all).

 

Another scenario is that your PC might be set to a "static" IP.  That is done on the PC itself in the network settings.  When it tries to connect to the router, it says "I want to connect and this is my IP" and it will always be the same.  If your router has handed out that IP via DHCP to another device, you get a dupe error since that IP is already in use.

 

Unless you are say, running a server inside your network, static IP's are not necessary.

 

 

 

Router: Netgear Wireless N 150 WNR1000






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