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Gaming desktop help


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10 replies to this topic

#1 Aez

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Posted 18 January 2016 - 12:12 PM

I want to buy, and or build a pc used primarily for gaming at the price of $600-700. I am not tech savvy at all, hence my presence here.
I know absolutely nothing about PC's.
Basically I'm asking one of you kind people to build one for me.
Maxium performance at this price range.
I want to be able to play games such as GTA5, battlefield, fallout 4, all the new type games.
Help?

Edit: Moved topic from Computer Gaming to the more appropriate forum. ~ Animal

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#2 webrat

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 11:14 AM

You're going to struggle to get solid performance at this price but you may get something ok if you look around hard enough. I can solidly recommend the Coolermaster Hyper 212 EVO CPU cooler (cheap) runs all my games at good temps. Also the Samsung 840 EVO SSD's (go for a small one, 120Gb). You could save money and buy a standard Hard Drive but the performance you gain from SSD in day to day use is insane.

 

Power Supplies are generally low cost. Aim for 600W minimum from a decent supplier. I run a solid gaming setup off a 550W Power supply but you'll want a very efficient GPU for that (generally not cheap) You don't really need a CD/DVD drive except for maybe loading the OS (borrow one) but again these are dirt cheap. Cheap Power supplies generally come with fixed cabling but modular is better if you can afford it as it gives you flexibility and keeps things tidy.

 

The parts you'll end up spending real money on are the Motherboard ,CPU, GPU and RAM. I use an ASUS Z97 M PLUS. Not the highest spec motherboard by any means but it does the job perfectly well.

 

Decent RAM is expensive, no way around this. You can get away with 8Gb. Add more later as you can afford. Most of the decent manufacturers sell stuff that will work perfectly well, the rest is detail and it's worth you understanding it so you know what you're getting. Draw up a shortlist of likely candidates then compare specs vs cost.

 

CPU will be your biggest obstacle. It'll dictate your motherboard to some extent and ideally you'll shave as much money as you can off the rest to get a good one. I'd start with Quad core as a minimum and work up to whatever your budget can handle from there - i3, i5 etc. It's won't be wasted if you play a lot of games or do other 'heavy lifting' tasks. Very difficult to advise on without a clear budget or idea of manufacturer. Some swear by AMD, others Intel but I'm not getting into flame wars.

 

GPU again is expensive for a half decent one. You'd be far better building your base system and waiting to buy a good one rather than compromising your whole system overall with poor choices to hit a number. You can play a number of games on low/medium settings with a decent CPU and enough RAM while you think about it. If you really must have one look at a 760 ti. They're solid and can be picked up relatively cheap. 

 

Lastly you'll need a case. There's a ton of decent cases at reasonable prices. Aim for one with built in case fans as it'll save you a bit of money and hassle overall for a first build. 

 

Use PC Partpicker to see if the stuff you're using is compatible. It'll also give you an idea of best price at the time.



#3 Dotlife

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 01:03 PM

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/NkCfNG

 

I left out the monitor/peripherals.  You can take out the optical drive and save $13.



#4 ScathEnfys

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 02:28 PM

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/NkCfNG
 
I left out the monitor/peripherals.  You can take out the optical drive and save $13.

AIO Liquid cooling is a gimmick - it tends to perform as well as or worse than a decent air cooler, except in situations where socket airflow is low.
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/rv4R23 <-- modified version with an EVO cooler - ~$25USD less.
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#5 Dotlife

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 02:30 PM

 

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/NkCfNG
 
I left out the monitor/peripherals.  You can take out the optical drive and save $13.

AIO Liquid cooling is a gimmick - it tends to perform as well as or worse than a decent air cooler, except in situations where socket airflow is low.
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/rv4R23 <-- modified version with an EVO cooler - ~$25USD less.

 

Didn't know about that!



#6 bc0306

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 04:48 PM

A p5n-SLI is a good choice too, for a fan choose one color blue which means cool and a nzxt pp500 PSU

Don't even think about it if your not sure


#7 diggi

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Posted 26 January 2016 - 07:15 AM

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/46dCjX



#8 Ram4x4

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Posted 26 January 2016 - 08:54 AM

Can you build a system for $500-$600, yes.  Will it be a decent gaming rig, simply put...no.

 

To play the games you've listed you need at least a GTX 970 video card, and that alone is $300+.  You could go with an AMD video card and save a little money and get similar performance, but the Radeon cards tend to run hotter and use a little more power.  You'd have to compare specs.

 

If you really want a good gaming rig, wait.  Save more money and do it right from the start.  There is nothing worse than spending your money on inferior hardware only to regret it after the fact.  You'll also be in the boat of looking to upgrade right from the get go and depending on what you buy for your low budget build may, or may not be upgradable.

 

For a decent budget gaming rig, here is what I would suggest (all from newegg.com):

 

CPU - I5-4670K                                                  $265

GPU - Gigabyte TwinTurbo OC GTX 970           $289 (after $20 mail-in rebate)

Mobo - ASUS Z97-E (2x PCI 3.0 slots)              $115

Mem - G. Skill Sniper series (2x4GB)                $ 37

Heatsink - Evo 212                                             $ 30

Case - pick your own                                          $ 30-60

PSU - Seasonic SSR-650RM                             $ 80 (after $10 mail-in rebate)

Monitor - Acer S220HQL 22"                              $100

Optical drive - pick one                                       $18+

SSD - 128GB Adata Premier Pro SP900           $50

 

Total                                                                   $1,019

 

A bit more than your budget, but....

 

I personally consider this setup just enough to decently play the games you listed.

 

I selected that mobo because it has 2x PCI 3.0 slots - this gives you ability to add another video card down the road in SLI if you want to.  You also have the option of swapping out the I5-4690K for an I7-4790K later as well (this gives you hyper threading and the 4.0GHz clock speed will boost frame rates in games).

 

Modular 650 watt power supply - some wattage overhead for expansion later, and modular...which will make running your wires in a mid size ATX case so much easier.

 

Depending on the case you pick, you might need an extra 120mm case fan or two.  Pick a case that cools well...put performance over looks.

 

You could step up to a 24" monitor for an extra $30ish.

 

Whatever you do, don't just buy the absolute minimum without ability for expansion.  You'll be sorry you did.  Now that Skylake and the Z170 chipset are out, the LGA1150 components will come down in price, so if you build a system that can be expanded, you'll be able to take advantage of that later on.



#9 ScathEnfys

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Posted 26 January 2016 - 10:05 AM

It may not be your idea of "decent", but even a ~$300 PC will trash modern consoles. That being said, I believe the "ideal" budget for a high-quality gaming PC is ~$1000.
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#10 webrat

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Posted 26 January 2016 - 10:20 AM

GTX 970 is in no way necessary to play modern games, sure, it's nice and it'll max everything, but that's not the same as being able to play it. This sounds like the 'must be ultra settings and 60fps at all times' school of gaming which does nobody any favors. Millions of people are quite happy with console games and a 970 would eat a console alive without breaking a sweat. 



#11 Ram4x4

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Posted 26 January 2016 - 12:03 PM

Typically, when someone is investing in a game rig they want to be able to crank up the settings.  A single 970 is in no way an "60 fps at ultra all the time" solution as there are games that will crush a single 970 even.

 

If I was going for the "60 fps at ultra all the time" approach, I'd be talking a 980 Ti, or possibly an SLI rig.

 

Considering the performance levels of the 960 and 970 and the cost, the 970 is the better solution, not only for the here and now, but down the road.

 

If your gaming consists of "lighter" games that aren't as graphics intensive, then a 960 is an OK choice, but most of the folks posting here are listing games that are the card killers. 

 

When building a system you also want to look further than just being able to play a certain game right now.  Most of the recent posters aren't even mentioning playing at 4K resolutions on multiple monitors and THAT is a whole other ball game.

 

If they want console games, then I would guess they wouldn't be posting about building a gaming PC,  but that's just me.


Edited by Ram4x4, 26 January 2016 - 12:04 PM.





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