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Microsoft updates support policy: New CPUs will require Windows 10:ZDnet


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#46 cat1092

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 03:33 AM

rp88, there's a page that gets updated every 2-3 months that removes undesirable updates that may lead to the install of Windows 10. Plus it's important either to set Windows Update for manual check, or check & allow the user to download which ones wanted. Most non-security updates aren't desired. Yes I agree that these tactics are stepping across the line, the 'security update' for IE11 in essence, included what's known as a PUP. 

 

Here's the page that will purge most all Telemetry & other unwanted updates for Windows 10. One must follow all steps, and the first part is made easy by the download of the provided .bat file. Bookmark & check back every 2-3 months. 

 

http://techne.alaya.net/?p=12499

 

 

Alternately, here is a .bat file to run the above commands. It must be run in an elevated command prompt. (Don’t forget to reboot afterwards. You can proceed to finish the next steps before rebooting.)

 

 

It's only the last part that I haven't done, blocking Internet access to the listed sites, because to do so will require it on each computer (some has 3 or more OS's), that makes for a lot of work. Of course these updates will be reoffered, but it should be common sense to hide these, otherwise why go through the trouble to begin with? 

 

 

 

Post #44:"Will purchase an OEM version of 8.1 to install on the PC, that'll hold until 2023"

 

That's because I assist others, in person & online, in order to assist others running a particular OS, it's best to have a copy of my own. While Windows 10 was free to be, the only reason it's installed is to get a UEFI BIOS for my GPU installed, it won't flash under Windows 7, and furthermore, cannot run the PC (or upgraded MB) as intended, in full UEFI mode using the UEFI defaults click in the firmware. By doing so w/out a UEFI VBIOS, the screen goes black & must unplug & move a jumper over to clear the settings. The main reason why I want to do this, is the added benefit of GPT partitioning, even on small SSD's, there's a bit more performance. Doesn't matter if it's only 1% faster in benchmarks, that's still a gain. 

 

Along with a few other speed tweaks, these adds up to be a nice gain in performance. No need to let new technology, especially if we have access to it (in our hands), left to waste. Being that this is not an OEM MB, rather one that I purchased & installed, Microsoft won't be able to use a 3rd party OEM, such as Dell or HP to pass along unwanted updates to firmware. Plus to further secure myself, have the 'wake on LAN' disabled. 

 

I've already done a lot of research, and will be doing more to ensure my PC's doesn't become Microsoft zombies, am also saving for a custom build around the CPU I'm breaking in on my XPS 8700, which lacks an important feature needed for OEM's to do this in vPro, a wide open backdoor for Microsoft, Intel & OEM's to force feed these firmware updates. And unlike I was accused of on the Dell Hardware Forum, I haven't 'bought into' conspiracy theories, it's reality that it can happen, and likely does every day on the corporate level. That's one way of mass upgrading tens (or hundreds of) thousands of computers by pressing 'Enter' with the firmware open & ready for the OK to proceed, probably supervised by more than one in charge to prevent abuse/sabotage by a disgruntled employee. Microsoft & the Big OEM's has the same tools, as does many world governmental agencies. Meaning one can have a Windows computer via an OEM, with only Linux installed, and still under control by both, if corrective actions aren't taken. 

 

Oh, and that XPS 8700 will be the next on the list for a MB swap, that'll allow me to remove all Dell branding from the PC (other than the case), and with a 1150 Z97 MB, can add a fast M.2 SSD that makes SATA-3 look as though going in reverse. As far as the installed OS's, other than Linux Mint 17, all are Full or Upgrade editions of Windows & should activate w/out phoning in, since there are no COA's baked into the firmware, like with the MB upgrade above. Under Activation, there showed '3 days to activate', clicked the tab & was done in seconds (same with MS Office). 

 

I was happy to grab myself that i7-4790K before pricing jumps to $400 or more (actually did hit the $450 level at one time), as pricing has already risen, there's no more $289-299 promos on Newegg for this chip. 

 

And fortunately, none of the 6th gen CPU's has yet to make it in PassMark's Top 10 list of common CPU's, if so, the 4790K would top the 6700K cleanly (it already has). On the link of the 6700K it shows for reference only, doesn't when researching other CPU's. Plus the 4790K shows to a better value for the dollar, with a non-OC Turbo Boost of 4.4GHz versus 4.2GHz for the 6700K, why not? Smaller dies will cause Moore's Law to have less of an effect in future releases, many of which are designed more for energy efficiency, rather than sheer power. Was hoping to see 5Ghz Quad CPU's as stock (pre-Turbo Boost), the trend was pointing towards it just 2-3 years back, it's likely not going to happen.

 

https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Core+i7-4790K+%40+4.00GHz

 

https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Core+i7-6700K+%40+4.00GHz

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


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#47 rp88

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 12:36 PM

Post #46
The problem is that where updates like KB3035583 are fairly simple to refuse, PUPs bundled into security updates don't seem to be "cut out able", that is to say that it seems the only options are to install the security update and have the PUP with it or not install the security update and face the risks (the problem being that sometimes other programs might call for bits of IE so just because you never use IE doesn't make you totally safe from vulnerabilities in it). Until someone figures out a way for users to cut KB3146449 out from KB3139929 this matter is an ongoing problem without solution. Many of the things on that list I've done, but not that disabling connections to particular domains stuff. The list doesn't yet warn of KB3139929 and its companion.


"have the 'wake on LAN' disabled"
How is that done?

"Meaning one can have a Windows computer via an OEM, with only Linux installed, and still under control by both, if corrective actions aren't taken. "
Is there a list of those corrective actions anywhere?

Edited by rp88, 20 March 2016 - 12:36 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#48 cat1092

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 04:32 AM

 

 

"have the 'wake on LAN' disabled"
How is that done?

 

Within the UEFI firmware (setup) of your computer, also still commonly called BIOS. 

 

 

 

Is there a list of those corrective actions anywhere? 

 

I read it on a website that's not bookmarked, one of the 'to do' things to keep a force fed firmware to be delivered is by either disable 'wake on LAN', meaning if the computer is connected via an Ethernet cable, it can't be woken by data coming through. There are also options in the Device Manager for the network connection regarding this setting & though I've done it there also, that's only on the OS level, which is different from the motherboard (PC) one. That's why one can have an OEM PC plugged in & not have a single Windows OS on it, say one or more Linux ones, and still get force fed the updated firmware. The motherboard, not the OS, is the heart & soul of the computer, and as shipped, was programmed to do as the OEM specifies. That may include firmware released by Microsoft, but passed onto the OEM's to enforce. Because each OEM knows the backdoor(s) of the computers they sell much better than Microsoft. 

 

That's one advantage of having a CPU w/out vPro support, one huge backdoor not to be concerned about. vPro is a feature of Intel CPU's, that allows for the management of computers remotely, yet there's things we all can do to lessen the risk. One is by disabling 'Wake on LAN'. There are surely more that I don't know about, though the one that's easily disabled. Another is disabling FastBoot, the hybrid Sleep mode that most all computers that shipped with Windows 8 or above has by default, it'll also prolong the life of the battery & other components. The truth to that is, the computer only performs a full shutdown with drivers or software requires a full reboot, or after Windows Update. The SMART data of one's drive will reveal this. The user may think they shutting down nightly, yet the SMART data of the HDD or SSD (which is not controlled by the OS nor the PC itself) tells a different story. Should you read it with the drive's supplied tools, and see that it's only been through 15 boots in a year, that's a surefire sign that something fishy is going on. 

 

Another telltale sign that something's up with lots of models of notebooks, after 2-3 hours of powering off with FastBoot enabled, feel around the power switch & along that section, there'll be warm spots (sometimes very warm), this is a battery killer. Consumer based computers are like autos, they need to be shutdown to rest, are not designed to run 24/7 for 10+ years (they'll likely not make it that long). Compared to batteries of earlier model computers, wear will be faster, and to further complicate matters, the case will have to be opened for replacement of a $100+ replacement. I have a Samsung in front of me, sold in December 2012, have had it since it was barely over 2 years old. When I got it, the battery life has already been depleted by over 30%. Now that may could had been avoided to some extent had the previous owner used the Samsung app to stop battery charge when reaching 80%, and used the app in the UEFI to fully drain/recharge the battery to calibrate every 6 months. But she didn't & when I first got it, had that warm feeling around the power switch, researched (Googled) it, FastBoot was the first of the Google hits. 

 

FastBoot is only a sales gimmick to make consumers think that computers with Windows 8 or above 'boots' as though greased lightning & that's all it is, and in the end, at the expense of the consumer in component replacement. It also provides an easy way to Wake on LAN, because it's not shutdown. Microsoft knows what they're doing, and have all of the large Windows OEM's by their throats. They may be allowed to sell a certain percentage of Linux computers, but only a small one. I don't know if that applies to Chromebooks, though truly it's Linux, some doesn't count it as such, especially the stat counters, if so, Linux usage would be much higher than reported. That's yet another Microsoft arm twisting job, they're deeply embedded in much everything in the US, including the government. That's why & how the EU forced Microsoft to it's knees, to allow it's consumers the choice of a browser other than IE, this would never happen on US soil. Because the majority of consumers has no backbone, and the government will stand by Microsoft's side because of their PRISM ties to spy on us. 

 

Anyone can do a little research & come up with the same findings. 

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#49 rp88

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 12:34 PM

Post 48

"connected via an Ethernet cable, it can't be woken by data coming through"
I always connect via ethernet, but never have the ethernet cable plugged in when the machines are switched off. So my machines can each be in one of three states:
1.turned off, the only thing connected being the power lead
2.turned on but not connected to anything but the power lead
3.turned on and connected to the internet via ethernet.

Given these circumstances does "wake on LAN" affect me at all? Can it do things to a computer that is on and in use and connected, or is it only of significance for computers left turned off by connected?

"disabling FastBoot ... it'll also prolong the life of the battery & other components."
Did that long ago.

Edited by rp88, 22 March 2016 - 12:34 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#50 cat1092

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 02:59 AM

 

 

"disabling FastBoot ... it'll also prolong the life of the battery & other components." 
Did that long ago. 

 

That's one of the best things that you could do to prolong it's life, and if the computer could, would reach out to thank you. :)

 

At least when it's shut down, it truly is. 

 

 

 

Given these circumstances does "wake on LAN" affect me at all? Can it do things to a computer that is on and in use and connected, or is it only of significance for computers left turned off by connected?

 

Being that I always disable the feature, am not afraid of what it can do if shot down. What can be done while connected, the downloading of packages, you may have to remove the crapware (a lot of the branded software bundled with the computer, including any 'updating services'. You can always manually search for the model & download/install any packages you wish to. As far as firmware upgrades, these are normally issued with fixes for specific issues (you must read the documentation about the version to determine), if your computer is performing well & the way you like, skip these updates. The risk outweighs any benefits, and you may actually lose performance. Furthermore, depending on the OEM, you may not be able to revert to the previously installed version. 

 

HP, among others, are notorious for this. It'll normally in manual mode, state upfront there's no turning back. That's why I skipped the first two UEFI firmware updates for the XPS 8700, the fixes didn't apply to me. The last two did, one for the install of nVidia GTX series GPU's, the other to prepare for Windows 10, yet there was a hidden benefit within it. To be able to run the i7-4790K with it's native Turbo Boost & two overclocking modes, though 4.4GHz is plenty enough for me, wouldn't use the other performance options w/out installing a 3rd party CPU cooler first. 

 

With HP Update (or whatever brand you're running) installed & enabled, most any update or upgrade could be silently fed to you w/out your consent. Of course, they'll say you consented by using the service. You can safely uninstall the service to avoid these, and as we discussed prior, go into CCleaner's interface & disable anything that has to do with Intel ME or vPro. You can also do this & may have more options by using the launching the msconfig utility as Administrator. There, you'll be presented with options you can disable, will require a reboot afterwards. 

 

As to Microsoft updating their policy in regards to Intel 6th gen CPU's, it reeks as though a hog farm in the country in the summer with the windows open, and being raised in the countryside, knows these stinks badly, as does this updated/revised policy. :angry:

 

Why didn't they do the same with 1st through 5th gen CPU's, and those before that? 64 bit XP Pro, though no longer supported, will run on a Haswell (4th gen) CPU, as long as the needed drivers are slipstreamed into the install media with nLite. This is just another way to force feed Windows 10 to consumers & that's the bottom line of the entire deal. It's regression, not progression. Windows 7 is supported until 2020, 8.1 until 2023, there's no logical reason why system builders cannot purchase & install these OS's on these CPU's. If some of the disabled features are the backdoors (such as vPro), they're doing the consumer a favor. :P

 

Yet Intel won't come clean & provide an itemized list of what 'won't work', if so, the list will likely be very short. 

 

Wonder where does AMD stand on this issue? They also signed a pact with Microsoft, related to new CPU's, as did Qualcomm, yet that may be for another discussion. Just wanted to make it known that both did so & AMD has a new line of CPU's coming out. 

 

This will likely cause the pricing of some lower cost 'last gen' CPU's to be raised, because they're likely aware that many of us enthusiasts & system builders knows about the partnership. Smart consumers will say NO to Skylake CPU's, after all, the i7-4790K tops their best anyway, the main difference is that the i7-6700K can use DDR4 RAM. Otherwise, it takes a back seat to the 4790K. 

 

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#51 rp88

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 02:15 PM

Post #50: "As far as firmware upgrades..."

My toshiba machine is BIOS, it never had any manufacturer made updaters on it at all.
My HP machine is UEFI, it does have an updater thing from HP on it. I set that updater to not even check without my asking so, and I then disabled it's startup tasks and services so it can only run on demand. I didn't uninstall the program though. I have never run any of the firmware/UEFI/BIOS/driver updates that this progra suggests as I've never had any problems with these parts of the system. I've already gone into CCleaner and siabled all the things there related to the updater, but I do notice that some intel related processes do run which may or may not be relevant to this. It may have some sort of "wake on LAN" thing in the UEFI, it might not, should I go into the UEFI/firmware settings accessible from the advanced startup menu of windows and disable any wake on LAN related stuff I see. I assume doing so won't mess with anything and will simply prevent this single thing running while having no ther effects? The toshiba machine is definitely pre haswell, the HP machine doesn't have a haswell but I don't right now remember what it does have. Both have i3 processors.

Edited by rp88, 24 March 2016 - 02:16 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#52 cat1092

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 05:52 AM

rp88, disabling 'wake on LAN' will have no negative effects on your computer, as this feature on most all of mine are disabled. 

 

It'll close a potential backdoor to your computer. While you can do so in the Device Manager of the Windows OS for the network adapter (& maybe Linux also), the setting is just restricted to that OS & not the machine as a whole. Only by changing this setting in the BIOS (pre UEFI) or on today's computers, in the UEFI settings, will it be disabled on the MB level, which is the most important. 

 

Any backdoor closed is better than none at all, and it's good that you disabled the HP Update, I've seen that download & install updates that caused problems. Really, if the optical drive is running fine, why update the firmware? Same with the HDD, if it's running good, there's no need to risk making a paperweight out of it (have seen this once). Since that notebook was under warranty, HP provided another HDD, along with the recovery disk set to restore Windows 7. 

 

i3 CPU's are decent ones, I believe we discussed that in a Topic awhile back. Much better than the dual core Pentium & Celeron models of the last few years & why we recommended to stay away from these, they're very weak & should be discontinued, am kind of surprised, given the low cost of the i3, that those two models hasn't been 'retired'. Even paired with 8GB RAM & a SSD, they're lethargic CPU's. One of my relatives performed that exact upgrade on a 2011-12 model HP with a dual core Pentium (actually I did the work), I seen it as wasted cash, while it did speed up a lot, nothing compared to an i3 or i5. 

 

This policy may backfire if more doesn't migrate to Windows 10, as growth has came to a near halt, despite it's up to a $200 upgrade (if Windows 10 Pro). Consumers are reading the news, it's all over the place that Windows 10 is riddled with privacy leaks (at least 35 known as of a few months back), that's why a developer created an app to close these & was posted on this forum. The number found has likely increased since then. More consumers are thinking rational, that's why when Windows 7 Pro computers are in retailers or online, these sells fast, even if a Windows 8.1 or 10 computer has more features for a lower price. They can charge for 7 Pro because of market demand. 

 

http://www.itworld.com/article/3039922/microsoft-windows/windows-10-growth-hits-the-brakes.html

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#53 JohnC_21

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Posted 05 September 2016 - 04:54 PM

Looks like the latest generation of Intel and AMD processors will only support Windows 10. No Windows 7 or 8 for you. They will support Linux, thank God.

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/09/02/windows_intel_kaby_lake_amd_zen/



#54 cat1092

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 05:25 AM

I had a hunch by talk at Overclock.net that the 6th gen 'i' series were a stepping stone for a much larger platform & it appears that's what's going to happen.

 

Though there's one little problem. 4th gen CPU's are still selling like crazy on Newegg & Amazon, plus other sites, though motherboard choices are fading & fast, probably will be end up being way over inflated in the secondary markets such as eBay. The price of the ASRock Extreme6 Z97 shot up by $30 less than 24 hours after I purchased the model, although they're offering rebates, some as high as $40 & as little as $10 for all Z97 MB's, mine was a $20 one, making it $109.99 after I get the rebate. The initial cost was $129.99. Now it's $159.99 with only a $10 rebate, so I hit the silicon lottery by ordering when I did. :thumbsup:

 

On the other hand, the ASUS Z97-Pro Gamer which I'm now on has remained the same, though was on promo over the weekend, perhaps to clear stock. While some may feel otherwise, I feel safe on the Z97 platform, plus am able to run the NVMe type of SSD's, and for now am on Windows 8.1, and see no need to upgrade now. If I were to, would perform a bare metal clone of a dead PC onto another SSD installed on this PC (or simply move the SSD over & reactivate, call the number & remember the key word on the first question, 'one'). This will allow one to activate w/out speaking to anyone, and can take a snapshot of the activation window for clean install with a digital camera, which I'd want to perform to have fresh drivers & all. 

 

Don't know yet what I'll do with the ASRock Z97 MB, it's already here & have ordered a case of the same brand, though not as upscale as my Fractal Design Define R5 (it's the 3300 series widebody for less than half the price). I'll also be purchasing a replacement 4th gen CPU for my XPS 8700, the i7-4770 is going in the ASRock Z97 Extreme6 build. Probably a i3 will be best for that PC, unless there's a promo for an i5. 

 

One thing for sure, I won't have to deal with this issue for the next decade, and Intel will still have to deal with the 4th gen market for at least another year, maybe two. :)

 

Intel should be proud of the success of the 4th gen, probably has been the most successful generation since the 'i' series has been released, and not kill it off. Why mess with success? Of course, that's the corporate world, here Intel is sitting with a 4th gen that's over 3 years old (began in June 2013), still selling like mad to build new PC's & upgrade off the shelf units, and they're going to cannibalize it, one way or the other. :angry:

 

If I were a major stockholder, would be screaming to put on the brakes on 'kaby_lake' & get the most out of what's on the market. Not repeat a Microsoft & release Windows 8 in 2012 when it wasn't needed, Windows 7 & MS Office 2010 were selling like hotcakes, if anything, upgraded Office only, Windows 8 was an unneeded OS that cost Microsoft a lot of cash for a large negative return. This is history repeating itself, hardly anyone heard of the 5th gen CPU's, and the 6th gen is far from making it to the Top 10 most commonly used CPU list. 

 

The only good news about 'kaby_lake' is that it'll have Linux support, though it's an odd name for a CPU, rhymes with 'baby'. :)

 

Now let's see if they can return to building CPU's the right way, using fluxless solder than using thermal paste that'll eventually dry out, which should be a concern for all with 3rd & 4th gen CPU's, At some point, most will require 'delidding', involves removal of the cap, cleaning everything up good, and use a tiny amount of liquid metal to fix what Intel messed up & reassemble. There are YouTube videos on how to perform this procedure, those who overclocks will be the first ones that'll require delidding, though if one goes unused & sits up too long, could also cause the low cost, inferior thermal paste to dry out. It's lower in cost than what many enthusiasts uses. Intel likely saved no more than $10 per CPU (if that) by doing a half baked job on these two families. 

 

And since 'Moore's Law' has been scrapped by Intel (though nVidia took the law & ran with it), don't expect any CPU to run at over 4GHz (except for any Turbo Boost enhancements), if that. It may be that the cap will be lowered, was hoping to see Intel mass produce a 5Ghz chip, though don't expect it to happen. They were almost there back in 2004 & chickened out. Even their engineers stated they'd handled cooling differently, rather than let OEM's such as Dell & HP do this for them. The result were capable chips that ran too hot to be stable at 3.8Ghz, though did have H/T technology. Just think where Intel would be by doing their own thinking. Dell & HP are in essence, mass scale OEM's, not qualified to implement proper cooling on new CPU's. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#55 sikntired

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 09:53 AM

Another interesting article that I came across today.

http://www.computerworld.com/article/3116886/microsoft-windows/i-don-t-like-being-force-fed-windows-10.html?ref=yfp

#56 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 10:17 AM

This just makes me glad that I’m a desktop Linux user. Linux, you see, will support the newest chips. Chromebook users can also look forward to running the fastest chips. Windows 7 and 8.1 users? Not so much.

 

 

If I only did basic browsing and email I would be looking at a chromebook.



#57 cat1092

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 03:10 AM

 

A quote in that article:

 

 

 

The real truth is that, free upgrades and all, Microsoft hasn’t been able to hit itsgoal of 1 billion Windows 10 users by 2018. Windows 10 has been adopted faster than any other version of Windows to date, but that’s not what Microsoft wanted. So, instead of trying more carrots — say, offering free upgrades again — Microsoft is resorting to the stick: You will run Windows 10 on new machines or nothing.

 

This is the main & only reason why kaby_lake won't be running W7 nor 8.1. :o

 

Yet there's hope on the horizon, and more users are flocking to it, and that's LInux. While there are many distros, one can easily search for the top ones, and try on until a suitable distro is found. One can do much anything on a Linux powered computer as Windows, and when the smoke clears, a lot more. :)

 

Though some may have to make some hard choices (example, those who has expensive software that runs on Windows only). No problem, one can purchase an OEM install of Windows 7, 8.1 or 10 & be in business with either Virtual Box or VMware Workstation Player (the latter is the best choice, once the user tries it). VMware allows for 10x the graphics RAM over VBox, which allows for either 128 or 256MB, while VMware allows for up to 2GB of video RAM on select OS's. Even Windows 7 has a 1GB option, 8.1 & 10 has 2GB options. VMware also doesn't have all of these crazy rules that has to be created just to plug in a USB device & attach, when the VM is up & running, will 'see' the device & can be installed, plus has native Bluetooth support out of the box. 

 

So even with kaby_lake & a Linux install, if one needs Windows (most Home users won't), and has a OEM or Full install license, can run any supported Windows OS. Even unsupported ones such as XP, if that's one's cup of tea, w/out risking infection of the host machine, as long as 'shared access or folders' are disabled. Though with Windows 7, I highly recommend a 30 day test install (which can be rearmed 2-3 times) to ensure it meets your needs before activating am OEM install. Because once activated, cannot be moved to another machine, unlike a Full license. For those with Upgrade licenses, the same trick that allows a clean install which I won't repeat here will work, am sure that those with these licenses knows the ropes. 

 

One can even create a VM of their OS & run in VMware, using a small tool published by Microsoft called 'Disk2vhd'.

 

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/ee656415.aspx

 

Prior to running the tool, it's necessary to defrag the OS & shrink the 'C' partition to a size of less than 127GB, some VM software may not recognize the virtual hard disk. Some choices also requires that the box 'Use vhdx' is unchecked, be sure to check out Tutorials before proceeding. 

 

This is also another way to revive a 'dead' computer that has a broken motherboard, by running it virtually, in essence, reusing an OS already on hand at zero extra cost. It may require reactivation, though it's no big deal. Call the activation center as instructed, and the magical word to prevent a long drawn out discussion is 'one' when asked how many machines it's been on. The activation center will update the info & you'll have to key in the number in eight blocks at a fast pace (the automated assistant will repeat a group if necessary). When completed, take a snapshot with a camera to have these numbers. The activation assistant will ask you to click to activate & normally, it goes right through, sometimes the change (watermark removal) won't be noticed until the next reboot. 

 

Once activated, be sure to backup regularly, one easy way to, is to create a folder on an external (NTFS formatting is fine), then open the folder & copy by drag & drop. This may take some time to complete, depending on the drive's speed, and if both the external & PC has USB 2.0, 3.0 or 3.1 ports. Of course, the higher, the faster the speed. This is how I backup my VM's, as well as the rest of the main folders in my Home folder. There's about a dozen, and if one has some w/out any content, these doesn't need to be carried over. On the external, keep everything in the one main folder, and don't defrag the drive. This can mess up virtual machine backups. 

 

So there it is, kaby_lake ruins nothing, and from the way things are shaping up, the 6th gen will never come close to topping the most successful to date, 4th gen 'i' series CPU's that's still rocking today. :thumbsup:

 

The only contender that was remotely close & popular, was Sandy Bridge. However, these CPU's, though easy to find, are often used, finding a MB will be harder than the CPU. That's what's beginning to happen with the 4th gen CPU's, not as many MB choices, especially for the Z97 platform. Yet there's a few good contenders left, look in my sig below, am typing this post on one of these. 

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813132412

 

The rest of the hardware is in my sig, other than the PSU. Really, the Speccy link doesn't do justice for the PC, there's a lot that doesn't show, though there'll be a major upgrade soon that will. :)

 

Plus will be dual booting with Linux Mint 18, as soon as I learn how to do it in UEFI mode. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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