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Anti Virus you can recommend?


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9 replies to this topic

#1 JosephPorter

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 08:14 AM

I am about to purchase a license Anti Virus for my new laptop what Anti Virus you can recommend? Please i need your recommendations.


Edited by Queen-Evie, 12 January 2016 - 09:38 AM.
moved from Malware Removal Logs to the appropriate forum


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#2 TheJokerz

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 10:13 AM

I use webroot and malwarebytes pro and it seems to work good for me so far.  I only game and do homework on my machines though.  Most people here would probably recommend Eset NOD32 though.  It is really all personal preference!  Hope this helps!


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#3 Sintharius

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 12:38 PM

You might want to read this: Choosing an Anti-Virus Program

Basically it all boils down to personal preference: Whether you want a multi-function suite or as simple as possible, novice or advanced user friendly, resource use, speed, cost etc. Detection is only one part, as the end user is the most important part of security.

Also most paid AVs have trials, so you can try them out and see if you like it before buying.

#4 quietman7

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 01:40 PM

I generally recommend ESET NOD32 Anti-Virus or Emsisoft Anti-Malware if choosing a paid for program as they leave a small footprint...meaning they are not intrusive and do not utilize a lot of system resources.

Emsisoft’s Behavior Blocker continually monitors the behavior of all active programs looking for any anomalies that may be indicative of malicious activity...it is able to detect unknown zero-day attacks, file-less malware that resides only in memory, zombies (the hijacking of host processes to load malicious code which execute via script parser programs), and file-encrypting malware (ransomware) attacks. Emsisoft Internet Security combines the best of both worlds...it is a complete security suite which combines Emsisoft Anti-Malware with an efficient powerful firewall created using the same core previously found in Emsisoft Online Armor.

ESET Antivirus and Smart Security uses a Host-based Intrusion Prevention System (HIPS) to monitor system activity with a pre-defined set of rules to recognize suspicious system behavior. When this type of activity is identified, HIPS stops the offending program from carrying out potentially harmful activity. ESET Antivirus (and Smart Security) includes Exploit Blocker which is designed to fortify applications that are often exploited, such as web browsers, PDF readers, email clients or MS Office components. This feature monitors the behavior of processes, looks for and blocks suspicious activities that are typical for exploits including zero-day attacks. ESET's Java Exploit Blocker looks for and blocks attempts to exploit vulnerabilities in Java.

ESET and Emsisoft Anti-Malware also have the added advantage of blocking the installation of most Potentially Unwanted Programs (PUPs) (such as adware, spyware, unwanted toolbars, browser hijackers) if you enable that feature.

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#5 ulqschiffer09

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 07:21 PM

I would suggest you to give it a try on those antivirus. Most AV provide 15-30 days trial run. Once trial end you should be able to decide which one you like. Choosing an AV is very preferential and based on personal taste. One man's meat is another man's poison. :bounce:

 

For me, I've tried CIS, Avira, Bitdefender, ESET and Avast before settling down with Emsisoft.


Edited by ulqschiffer09, 12 January 2016 - 07:22 PM.


#6 quietman7

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 08:28 PM

ESET offers a 30-day free trial for all their products.

By default Emsisoft Anti-Malware installs as a free fully functional 30-day trial version with real-time protection. After the trial period expires you can either choose to buy a full version license or continue to use it in limited freeware mode which still allows you to scan and clean infections. The freeware mode no longer provides any real-time protection to guard against new infections. However, at any time during the trial enabled period, you can easily turn off all real time protection and just use it as on-demand scanner only. Once the trial period expires nothing really changes except that the options to activate real-time protection are no longer available without purchasing the full version.
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#7 quietman7

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 08:41 AM

Although McAfee (now owned by Intel Security is as good as any other well known anti-virus program, it requires numerous services and running processes that consume a lot of system resources and often results in complaints of high CPU usage. Anti-virus software components insert themselves deep into the operating systems core where they install kernel mode drivers that load at boot-up and create files/folders/registry entries in various locations. If you do a Google Search you will find there have been numerous complaints about it affecting system performance.

Those issues plus the cost factor are the primary reason many folks look for a free alternative. IMO, McAfee is better utilized in an Enterprise system environment protecting many client computers.
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#8 staceymatthews

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Posted 18 February 2016 - 03:34 AM

Comodo Free Antivirus has all the features to protect the security loopholes in Windows 7,8 & 10. Their customer care is also a great support when you need them. So i recommend to Comodo Antivirus.



#9 davnel

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Posted 18 February 2016 - 12:16 PM

One of the major support problems I run into constantly is users installing multiple AV products on Windows machines. Most store-bought computers come with a lot of junk preinstalled. Among them are programs like Semantec's Norton Antivirus or McAffee. They go so far as to disable the Microsoft Defender ( built into Win 8 or 10), or Microsoft Security Essentials ((free user installed AV). Multiple AVs cause a lot of conflict problems. My usual answer is to get rid of the junk and install/reenable the Microsoft offerings. Microsoft also provides a malware removal tool with the monthly updates.

 

Despite the number of AV and AM products on the market, for Windows, at least, I see no reason to use them and many reasons NOT to. Microsoft's products are good, free, and work well. Why spend money on products that don't work well, take up too many resources, and cause problems (for which Norton is infamous)? Those products are preinstalled to provide the computer manufacturer with a little additional revenue. The mom and pop users don't understand, and I end up with the support headaches.



#10 quietman7

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Posted 18 February 2016 - 02:41 PM

The disabling of Windows Defender during the installation or pre-install of a third-party anti-virus is more of a design by Microsoft...Windows Defender recognizes the install and automatically disable itself to avoid conflicts.
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