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26-Year-Old Hacker Sentenced to Record 334 Years in Prison


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 11 January 2016 - 04:16 PM

 

A 26-year-old hacker has been sentenced to 334 years in prison for identity theft as well as mass bank fraud in Turkey, or in simple words, he has been sentenced to life in prison.
 
Named Onur Kopçak, the hacker was arrested in 2013 for operating a phishing website that impersonated bank site, tricking victims into providing their bank details including credit card information.
 
 

Kopçak's website was part of a big credit card fraud scheme in which he and other 11 operators were making use of the illegally obtained bank account details to carry out fraudulent operations.

 
During his arrest in 2013, Turkish law authorities charged Kopçak with:
  • Identity fraud
  • Website forgery
  • Access device fraud
  • Wire fraud...
...and sentenced him to 199 years 7 months and 10 days in prison, following complaints from 43 bank customers.

 

26-Year-Old Hacker Sentenced to Record 334 Years in Prison

 

Personal Rant

 

Good about time the authorities took this stuff seriously.

 

 

 



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#2 TheJokerz

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Posted 11 January 2016 - 04:24 PM

Good!  I hope he rots in there!


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#3 cat1092

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Posted 06 February 2016 - 03:54 AM

 

 

Good about time the authorities took this stuff seriously.

 

+1! :thumbup2:

 

Today's 'outlaws' doesn't use guns, it's more profitable with less risk to perform their deeds online. In fact, cyber crime has risen dramatically since the turn of the Millennium. 

 

Therefore, we need to make examples out of those who are caught stealing Billions of dollars from innocent victims every year, I feel that the consecutive sentences fits the crime. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 Atomic77

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Posted 07 February 2016 - 04:12 PM

Um he could still hack from jail. he might sneek in a laptop or a tablet some how.


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#5 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 21 February 2016 - 09:27 PM

Finally the authorities take this seriously. They need to realize how big a threat this is.

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#6 cat1092

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Posted 22 February 2016 - 03:57 AM

Um he could still hack from jail. he might sneek in a laptop or a tablet some how.

 

If he does, then maybe solitary for the next 40+ years will break him from his dirty deeds, where there is likely zero wireless signal, and just maybe, may get a 2nd shot at life. 

 

Just ask this dude, who after 43 years of being in solitary (two-thirds of his life), pleaded no contest to misdemeanor charges just to get out at the age of 69 while still sane. It was never proven that he nor the other inmate (Herman Wallace, deceased) involved were in fact guilty, not even the widow of the prison guard objected to the deal. This was during a time when US prisoner abuse was at an all time high, so it's kind of hard for me to have compassion over the guard involved, as well as the justice system in the state, despite the two losses for the state on appeals, they were considering retrial w/out a single alive witness, a total disregard of justice. The entire prosecution hinged on the testimony of a serial rapist who was granted a pardon in exchange for his statement, died before the second trial (details in 2nd link). Fortunately, these days, we don't accept deals from such offenders & never should had to begin with, what wasn't said in the article if he reoffended or not. The good thing is we now know he wont again. :P

 

Fortunately for Alford Woodfox, he walked out a free man just days ago. What's not said in either of these articles, is that he, as well as the other accused who was released to die two days later in 2013, were that both could have received a similar deal years ago (a guilty plea instead of no contest), both refused because they were innocent. This was announced on TV, so can't provide a link. 

 

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/feb/19/albert-woodfox-released-louisiana-jail-43-years-solitary-confinement

 

http://www.newschannel6now.com/story/31266041/last-of-angola-three-inmates-released-thanks-supporters

 

This dude who has likely stolen billions of dollars & has in fact been proven guilty, I don't see any form of punishment as an injustice, including solitary for life in near total darkness with no visitation privileges nor phone calls, should he ever get caught with a digital device that can receive & send signals to the outside of prison walls. Rules are rules & I don't think that any infraction of these will be tolerated by the government who prosecuted him. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 Bezukhov

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Posted 22 February 2016 - 01:51 PM

I want to send him 334 birthday cards. Everyone dated for each year of his sentence.
To err is Human. To blame it on someone else is even more Human.

#8 NeapTide

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Posted 22 February 2016 - 08:38 PM

That hacker if got access to jail computers can come out clean. Just sayin.



#9 cynical_guy

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 09:46 PM

Just a basic computer user, but I still feel sentence was a bit much.  Only because it was for 334 yrs.  Why not be I dunno, realistic?, and just say life in prison w/o possibility of parole.   Though I do feel strongly that extremely harsh examples like so need to be done.

 

Another great one for me anyway, is to remove both hands, and prison time.  But....



#10 cat1092

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 01:00 AM

Maybe to some, the sentence was considered 'harsh', yet we have to remember that in the US, Bernie Madoff was sentenced similarly, with 150 years behind bars at an advance age & later battled cancer. 

 

While much of the stolen money was recovered, and he insists that if it weren't for his cooperation, there wouldn't be as much recovery, that doesn't matter. When the US government wants to make an example out of someone, they do a great job (Martha Stewart can verify this). Bernie's last ditch hope is a pardon by outgoing President Obama, who likely won't grant it, this was a total disgrace, topped off by one of his sons (Mark) who couldn't handle the pressure anymore & committed suicide, leaving behind two small children w/out a father. Trying in vain to regain his life, and was never among those convicted in the scheme, nor was his brother, in fact it was the two of them who turned their own father to the FBI. No other family member was accused of a crime, if there had been, would had been his wife, Ruth Madoff, who was there throughout the entire span, and married to him before I was born in 1959. She done a dam* good job of playing ignorant, is all I can say. :P

 

The one whom took his life had immense pressure coming from both sides, being a 'whistleblower' or snitch (& against his own dad at that), and under suspicion of being in on the deal, topped by the fact that his young children may be held liable in years to come, when in fact, the scheme began before either of the brothers were born. In his own respect, had became a prisoner in his own body & mind, just couldn't take it anymore. Later on, Madoff's wife Ruth stopped visiting him under pressure of the surviving son Andrew, who later died of returning blood cancer, stress of the situation didn't help matters. So Madoff lives it up behind bars, has 'many friends', as some has reported 'consulting' with him for financial advice with some form of pay, and now has two dead sons to show for his crimes, in addition to the time he's serving. 

 

The remainder of the group, while too sentenced to prison, received much shorter terms, and will likely walk free one day, yet most should alive. 

 

Madoff can rot in prison as far as I'm concerned. He wrecked the lives of many, and refuses to accept responsibility, pointing towards those who received huge positive gains out of the deal as proof that many 'thrived' during the scheme. President Obama will likely not pardon nor commute his sentence. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 01 June 2016 - 01:11 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 johnmeehan

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 10:42 AM

In the U.S. he would probably would be eligible for parole after 3 years.  Okay that may be a slight exageration.



#12 TheTripleDeuce

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 04:16 PM

and sentenced him to 199 years 7 months and 10 days in prison

 

how do we get 334 years?



#13 oldguyjesse67

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 05:46 PM

Holy smokes, I don't think I would handle life in prison. 



#14 Animal

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 06:09 PM

and sentenced him to 199 years 7 months and 10 days in prison

how do we get 334 years?


Like the article stated:

However, during the investigation, 11 other bank customers also filed complaints about their payment card fraud, thus triggering a new trial.


Oh, 199 + 135 = 334 years in Prison


During the new trial, which was concluded yesterday (January 10), the Mersin Third Criminal Court of General Jurisdiction further added another 135 years to Kopçak's original sentence of 199 years 7 months and 10 days in prison, Daily Sabah reported.


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#15 TheTripleDeuce

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 07:52 PM

Doh! I stopped reading at the ad lol literally right before that part






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