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What Antivirus for somebody that does P2P?


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#1 Enterprise256

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 08:33 AM

Our subscription for Norton 360 Multi-Device has expired and we are considering staying with Norton or migrating to something better! Paid or Free is fine.

 

The requirements for the subscription (if paid) is to be valid for a minimum of 3 Windows machines. Having the same subscription valid for Android phones is also nice (like Norton) but not a necessity since I don't think AV's for Android is really needed, although I could be wrong! And it must be robust enough for users that do P2P.

 

The AV would be supplemented by MBAM, Cryptoprevent, and some common sense!

 

Thanks! And hope you guys can help!


Edited by Enterprise256, 07 January 2016 - 08:34 AM.


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 08:45 AM

I generally recommend ESET NOD32 Anti-Virus or Emsisoft Anti-Malware as they leave a small footprint...meaning they are not intrusive and do not utilize a lot of system resources. Kaspersky Anti-virus is also a good choice for the same reason.

Emsisofts Behavior Blocker continually monitors the behavior of all active programs looking for any anomalies that may be indicative of malicious activity...it is able to detect unknown zero-day attacks, file-less malware that resides only in memory, zombies (the hijacking of host processes to load malicious code which execute via script parser programs), and file-encrypting malware (ransomware) attacks. ESET Antivirus and Smart Security uses Exploit Blocker which is designed to fortify applications that are often exploited. ESET monitors the behavior of processes, looks for and blocks suspicious activities that are typical for exploits including. ESET's Java Exploit Blocker looks for and blocks attempts to exploit vulnerabilities in Java.

ESET and Emsisoft Anti-Malware also have the added advantage of blocking the installation of most Potentially Unwanted Programs (PUPs) (such as adware, spyware, unwanted toolbars, browser hijackers) if you enable that feature.

eam_pup_728x574_en.png

BTW...the practice of using any torrent, file sharing, peer-to-peer (P2P) program or visiting such sites is a security risk which can make your system susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft.Many security forums ask members to remove P2P software before assisting them with malware disinfection. The nature of such software and the high incidence of infection or reinfection is counter productive to restoring the computer to a healthy state.
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#3 Enterprise256

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 09:07 AM

I generally recommend ESET NOD32 Anti-Virus or Emsisoft Anti-Malware as they leave a small footprint...meaning they are not intrusive and do not utilize a lot of system resources. Kaspersky Anti-virus is also a good choice for the same reason.

Emsisofts Behavior Blocker continually monitors the behavior of all active programs looking for any anomalies that may be indicative of malicious activity...it is able to detect unknown zero-day attacks, file-less malware that resides only in memory, zombies (the hijacking of host processes to load malicious code which execute via script parser programs), and file-encrypting malware (ransomware) attacks. ESET Antivirus and Smart Security uses Exploit Blocker which is designed to fortify applications that are often exploited. ESET monitors the behavior of processes, looks for and blocks suspicious activities that are typical for exploits including. ESET's Java Exploit Blocker looks for and blocks attempts to exploit vulnerabilities in Java.

ESET and Emsisoft Anti-Malware also have the added advantage of blocking the installation of most Potentially Unwanted Programs (PUPs) (such as adware, spyware, unwanted toolbars, browser hijackers) if you enable that feature.

eam_pup_728x574_en.png

BTW...the practice of using any torrent, file sharing, peer-to-peer (P2P) program or visiting such sites is a security risk which can make your system susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft.

Many security forums ask members to remove P2P software before assisting them with malware disinfection. The nature of such software and the high incidence of infection or reinfection is counter productive to restoring the computer to a healthy state.
 
Not using P2P is not exactly an option since most of the program we use are or can be distributed using Torrent files instead of direct downloads. Our connection is not fast enough to cope with downloading direct downloads reliability as it may sometimes disconnect or corrupt the download.
 
Are the three programs you mentioned ESET, Emisoft, and Kaspersky better than Norton? We have been using Norton for the past couple of years and have had no problems with it.
 
Sure there isn't a "Perfect" AV but surely there is some sort of ranking going on? Also does the three programs you mentioned have some sort of Firewall implementation?

#4 Sintharius

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 09:27 AM

In terms of firewall, the suite versions (Emsisoft Internet Security, ESET Smart Security, Kaspersky Internet Security) have firewalls. It is not necessary for home users as the Windows Firewall is good enough.

All three have 30-day trials, so it is best that you try all three and pick one that you like best.

#5 quietman7

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 09:29 AM


There are several reputable labs which test the effectiveness of major anti-virus programs and security suites to include AV-Comparatives.org, Virus Bulletin Comparative Tests, AV-Test.org, NSS Labs Consumer Anti-Malware Products Group Test Report, etc.
These kinds of comparative testing results will vary depending on a variety of factors to include but not limited to who conducted the testing, what they were testing for (type of threats, attack vectors, exploits), what versions of anti-virus software was tested, what type of scanning engine was used, and the ability to clean or repair. There are no universally predefined set of standards or criteria for testing which means each test will yield different results. As such, you need to look for detailed information about how the tests were conducted, the procedures used, objectivity and data results. Read Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organization: AMTSO Fundamental Principles of Testing.

Each security vendor uses their own testing/analysis methodology to identify various types of malware so the detection results are not always the same.Some of the testing criteria and standards may even be misleading.

...for some unknown reason...the renowned German test lab AV-TEST has quietly (there was no warning) modified its certification process. The changes mean that the certificates produced by the new rules are, to put it mildly, pretty useless for evaluating the merits of different AV products...With AV-TEST’s new certification standards, the onus is on the user to carefully investigate the actual results of each individual test…they may find that a product that blocked 99.9% of attacks has the same “certification” as a product that only blocked 55%.

Comparative testing: A bit of background for the uninitiated

Although Norton (Symantec) is as good as any other well known anti-virus program, it is costly, requires numerous services and running processes that consume system resources and often results in complaints of high CPU usage. Anti-virus software components insert themselves deep into the operating systems core where they install kernel mode drivers that load at boot-up and create files/folders/registry entries in various locations.

I have read from other users that Norton has made improvements in newer versions of their software so they are not as resource heavy as past versions...while others still say differently. Those issues plus the cost factor are the primary reason many folks look for a free alternative. IMO, Norton is better utilized in an Enterprise system environment protecting many client computers. With that said, there are a lot of folks who prefer using Norton (especially if it came preinstalled) and there is nothing wrong with staying with a product you are satisfied with.

Most Internet Security products include antivirus and firewall protection plus various other features depending on the software vendor...and for those reasons it is called a Security suite.

I'm not an advocate of suites. All-in-one tools and suites are filled with extra features (including "bells & whistles") which typically use more system resources than separate programs that do the same task while other suites leave a much smaller footprint. Suites tend to have varying degrees of strengths and weaknesses accorded for each feature they incorporate. Internet Security Suites include a Firewall component, which IMO is unnecessary since the Windows built-in firewall is adequate protection and many folks also use a router. In contrast, separate tools are designed, built and maintained with a greater focus in a specific area so they are generally of better quality and more effective at what they are designed to do. This means the program's performance for that particular feature is usually superior than their all-in-one counterpart. Further, all-in-one tools generally do not allow the user as much flexibility in tailoring program settings and usage.If you are adamant about using a suite, then I would recommend one of the following:
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#6 Enterprise256

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 10:24 AM

There are several reputable labs which test the effectiveness of major anti-virus programs and security suites to include AV-Comparatives.org, Virus Bulletin Comparative Tests, AV-Test.org, NSS Labs Consumer Anti-Malware Products Group Test Report, etc.
These kinds of comparative testing results will vary depending on a variety of factors to include but not limited to who conducted the testing, what they were testing for (type of threats, attack vectors, exploits), what versions of anti-virus software was tested, what type of scanning engine was used, and the ability to clean or repair. There are no universally predefined set of standards or criteria for testing which means each test will yield different results. As such, you need to look for detailed information about how the tests were conducted, the procedures used, objectivity and data results. Read Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organization: AMTSO Fundamental Principles of Testing.

Each security vendor uses their own testing/analysis methodology to identify various types of malware so the detection results are not always the same.

Some of the testing criteria and standards may even be misleading.

...for some unknown reason...the renowned German test lab AV-TEST has quietly (there was no warning) modified its certification process. The changes mean that the certificates produced by the new rules are, to put it mildly, pretty useless for evaluating the merits of different AV products...With AV-TEST’s new certification standards, the onus is on the user to carefully investigate the actual results of each individual test…they may find that a product that blocked 99.9% of attacks has the same “certification” as a product that only blocked 55%.

Comparative testing: A bit of background for the uninitiated

Although Norton (Symantec) is as good as any other well known anti-virus program, it is costly, requires numerous services and running processes that consume system resources and often results in complaints of high CPU usage. Anti-virus software components insert themselves deep into the operating systems core where they install kernel mode drivers that load at boot-up and create files/folders/registry entries in various locations.

I have read from other users that Norton has made improvements in newer versions of their software so they are not as resource heavy as past versions...while others still say differently. Those issues plus the cost factor are the primary reason many folks look for a free alternative. IMO, Norton is better utilized in an Enterprise system environment protecting many client computers. With that said, there are a lot of folks who prefer using Norton (especially if it came preinstalled) and there is nothing wrong with staying with a product you are satisfied with.

Most Internet Security products include antivirus and firewall protection plus various other features depending on the software vendor...and for those reasons it is called a Security suite.

I'm not an advocate of suites. All-in-one tools and suites are filled with extra features (including "bells & whistles") which typically use more system resources than separate programs that do the same task while other suites leave a much smaller footprint. Suites tend to have varying degrees of strengths and weaknesses accorded for each feature they incorporate. Internet Security Suites include a Firewall component, which IMO is unnecessary since the Windows built-in firewall is adequate protection and many folks also use a router. In contrast, separate tools are designed, built and maintained with a greater focus in a specific area so they are generally of better quality and more effective at what they are designed to do. This means the program's performance for that particular feature is usually superior than their all-in-one counterpart. Further, all-in-one tools generally do not allow the user as much flexibility in tailoring program settings and usage. If you are adamant about using a suite, then I would recommend one of the following:

 

I haven't noticed Norton affecting performance nowadays. All AV's protect on system boot before the GUI even loads right?

 

So avoid Norton simply because of costs unless it's being used in a Enterprise setting? I've looked at the AV tests and most of them don't test Symantec/Norton? Is there a reason?


Edited by Enterprise256, 07 January 2016 - 10:32 AM.


#7 quietman7

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 11:16 AM

As I said earlier, there are a lot of folks who prefer using Norton (especially if it came preinstalled) and there is nothing wrong with staying with a product you are satisfied with.

When regards to testing, be aware that Norton is the same as Symantec and testers may only have that name listed. Listing is usually in alphabetical order and if looking specifically for Norton, you could miss it.

AV Comparatives List of AV Vendors (PC)

We get sometimes asked why we do not test all AV’s out there. There exist several hundred (several thousand worldwide, if we would count every rebranded security software or other various products providing some form of security).

We usually include only about 16-20 of the most well-known AV products in our public main test-series. Some other can be found in our single product tests, several more are getting tested only internally.


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#8 Enterprise256

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 04:26 PM

As I said earlier, there are a lot of folks who prefer using Norton (especially if it came preinstalled) and there is nothing wrong with staying with a product you are satisfied with.

When regards to testing, be aware that Norton is the same as Symantec and testers may only have that name listed. Listing is usually in alphabetical order and if looking specifically for Norton, you could miss it.

AV Comparatives List of AV Vendors (PC)

We get sometimes asked why we do not test all AV’s out there. There exist several hundred (several thousand worldwide, if we would count every rebranded security software or other various products providing some form of security).

We usually include only about 16-20 of the most well-known AV products in our public main test-series. Some other can be found in our single product tests, several more are getting tested only internally.

 

Yes but the only place I saw Symantec(Norton) tested was one site out of 5.



#9 quietman7

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 04:31 PM

Perhaps Symantec chooses not to participate. I doubt any reputable testing service would deliberately exclude a well known major vendor.
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#10 Enterprise256

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 05:34 PM

Perhaps Symantec chooses not to participate. I doubt any reputable testing service would deliberately exclude a well known major vendor.

Seems rather hard to trust a vendor that won't participate in tests.

 

I seem to be leaning towards Emnisoft because you said it can detect things that run in memory, unless of course all the AV's you mentioned do that. And ESET because of their attractive pricing for 6 devices.

 

I think it's just a matter of which one is more robust. I will definitely be getting a suite with Firewall since I got used to Norton having one and I makes use feel safer even if it's like a placebo effect. The price with the addition of the Firewall is not that much, something like $2 -5 IIRC?

 

I just noticed this in one of the testing groups...

79f6dc70_4.PNG

What does "User dependent" mean? It's for Emsisoft.

 

EDIT: What's your opinion on BitDefender and TrendMicro?


Edited by Enterprise256, 07 January 2016 - 05:41 PM.


#11 quietman7

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 06:08 PM

Emsisoft Internet Security (EIS) is a complete security suite which combines Emsisoft Anti-Malware with an efficient powerful firewall created using the same core previously found in Emsisoft Online Armor. The rest of the software code is hand·made by the Emsisoft team. I don't know anything about ESET's firewall.

You can purchase a license for multiple computers for 1, 2, or 3 years usually with a discount if more than a year. Delievery as a boxed CD-Rom edition is also available.

Emsisoft detects 100% in March edition of AV-Comparatives Real-World Protection test

For this test, AV-Comparatives used a test set of 410 live test cases (malicious URLs found in the field) consisting of working exploits (i.e. drive-by downloads) and URLs pointing directly to malware. In other words, mimicking the threats a typical user would experience in everyday life...Emsisoft detected all threats, and thereby received a 100% detection rate. In 0.7% of the cases Emsisoft Anti-Malware displayed an alert which recommends the user to block the threat instead of automatic removal, which is why AV-C counts these as user dependent.


Some of the employees involved with Emsisoft product development, research and technical support are well known security experts who have volunteered their personal time to assist victims of malware infection long before their program was created. They still stay personally involved with helping victims on Internet forum boards as well as provide individual support services to users of their products. This means they are personally tuned into the day to day analysis of active malware and any reported issues with their software so they are able to respond quickly to them.

At least three of the Emsisoft Team provide assistance to members here at Bleeping Computer. Fabian Wosar is a Security Developer, GT500 is a Security Colleague and Elise is our Malware Study Hall Admin who oversees the Bleeping Computer Training Program.

No amount of money can buy such dedication and support.

I have never used either Bitdefender or Trend Micro. I know several of our members use Bitfender and are satisfied with it.
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#12 Enterprise256

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:21 AM

Emsisoft Internet Security (EIS) is a complete security suite which combines Emsisoft Anti-Malware with an efficient powerful firewall created using the same core previously found in Emsisoft Online Armor. The rest of the software code is hand·made by the Emsisoft team. I don't know anything about ESET's firewall.

You can purchase a license for multiple computers for 1, 2, or 3 years usually with a discount if more than a year. Delievery as a boxed CD-Rom edition is also available.

Emsisoft detects 100% in March edition of AV-Comparatives Real-World Protection test

For this test, AV-Comparatives used a test set of 410 live test cases (malicious URLs found in the field) consisting of working exploits (i.e. drive-by downloads) and URLs pointing directly to malware. In other words, mimicking the threats a typical user would experience in everyday life...Emsisoft detected all threats, and thereby received a 100% detection rate. In 0.7% of the cases Emsisoft Anti-Malware displayed an alert which recommends the user to block the threat instead of automatic removal, which is why AV-C counts these as user dependent.


Some of the employees involved with Emsisoft product development, research and technical support are well known security experts who have volunteered their personal time to assist victims of malware infection long before their program was created. They still stay personally involved with helping victims on Internet forum boards as well as provide individual support services to users of their products. This means they are personally tuned into the day to day analysis of active malware and any reported issues with their software so they are able to respond quickly to them.

At least three of the Emsisoft Team provide assistance to members here at Bleeping Computer. Fabian Wosar is a Security Developer, GT500 is a Security Colleague and Elise is our Malware Study Hall Admin who oversees the Bleeping Computer Training Program.

No amount of money can buy such dedication and support.

I have never used either Bitdefender or Trend Micro. I know several of our members use Bitfender and are satisfied with it.

 

Okay I've tried Emnisoft and they UI seems lacking? It looks and feels so barebones, not unlike Norton where you can fiddle around with a ton of settings to make it run as heavy or light as you want. Is this a good or bad thing?

 

I'm going to try Bitdefender next because most people on OCN seem to recommend that.



#13 Sintharius

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:32 AM

Emsisoft's GUI is designed to be simplistic and easy to navigate, as the products are aimed at non-savvy users. There are options offered to modify things though.

#14 Enterprise256

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 05:15 AM

Emsisoft's GUI is designed to be simplistic and easy to navigate, as the products are aimed at non-savvy users. There are options offered to modify things though.

Okay I want more control, which one would be for me? I leave nothing untouched, there is always something to change for me.

 

EDIT: I liked how Norton had oodles to change to make it more aggressive. Just shying from it now because of what they say about it.


Edited by Enterprise256, 08 January 2016 - 05:17 AM.


#15 Sintharius

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 05:20 AM

I have not used BitDefender or Trend Micro, so you might want to try both.

However I am not a big fan of both because they have unnecessary features and take more resources than Emsisoft (which is what I am using now). Not to mention reports of unsatisfactory customer support.




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