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Confused and Frustrated. Hardware Failure? Please Help!


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#1 Gh0st78

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 10:16 PM

Hey guys,

So I have a weird green artifact/crash that continually happens while gaming (on or after 2 hours). I had this twice before when the system was new (4+ yrs).

It looks exactly like this:
http://www.overclock.net/t/1310765/is-my-gtx580-screwed...

So exact same problem as that. Freeze/Artifact/Nvidia Driver Crash. It says driver crashed and recovered. Everything else works fine during this. Mumble, teamspeak, music etc. I have monitored temperatures and it can and will still happen at or under 70c. I have also tried a number of different nvidia drivers.

But here is the weird part that is confusing me. I had read about a lot of owners with this exact problem and fixing it by upping the core voltage. So I attempted the fix and raised my 1.013v to 1.025v and proceeded to play various games for most of the day and night (8hours probably) with no crashes. I did not save those settings however. Next day when I go to raise it up again it instantly gives me the exact same crash/artifacts with out having ever entered a game. I tried it a few times and it would happen 90% of the time.. The other 10% it would hold until I put the gpu under any load then crash.

So I'm confused and need advice. Is this most likely a GPU failure or could it be PSU or Motherboard? I'm looking to replace something and get things fixed but I don't know where to begin. Also I don't have any extra parts to swap in to check.

Is there a benchmark or failure type test I should try running? I assume it would probably not crash for the same amount of time as a game would.

The rest of the system is:

CPU: Intel® Core i7-2600K 3.40 GHz
MEMORY: 8GB DDR3
MOTHERBOARD: GigaByte G1.Sniper2 Intel Z68
POWERSUPPLY: 1,000 Watts - CoolerMaster Silent Pro Gold Gaming 80 Plus
OS: Windows 7 64-Bit

Watercooling on the CPU.

Thanks for any and all help.



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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 11:26 PM

Sounds like a general gpu failure, maybe its time to get a new one.


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#3 technonymous

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 12:04 AM

It could be a combination of things. Heat, Overclocking, MOBO, PSU, etc. It's difficult to pinpoint as there is so many variables. If you can test the card in another system that would help a lot to determine if it's video card or something else. I have come across systems with artifacts like that before and it turned out there nothing wrong with the video card at all. On the flip side yes, card failure will also do the same thing. Power starved, shoddy firmware, physical card damage, blown caps, water cooler leakage, gpu overheating. I once had a guy that had a cpu water cooler dripping down on to the video card. It can be a number of things.


Edited by technonymous, 07 January 2016 - 12:26 AM.


#4 Gh0st78

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 12:40 AM

Thanks for the quick replies guys. The water cooling leakage might be a factor as the last time I took everything apart to clean my friend noticed a weird lack of dust on the card compared to the surrounding area. Almost like a water drop I suppose. I checked everything and it wasn't damp also there doesn't seem to be a noticeable leak. The other thing that steered me away from that was that it happened two or three times when I first got the PC and then not again for years later. I posted this else where and someone mentioned to down clock the card to see how it operates and narrow things down. Using after burner I down clocked by 100mhz. It remained stable AND didn't crash but I didn't test it as long as I could of. 

I guess my main question is how can I test the gpu itself? Preferably without having to play a game for 2 hours and see if it happens or doesn't. A lot of the time it varies around what time it will crash by 30 minutes or so. Is there a benchmark tool that I can use for this that will measure the same sort of load my PC would be under? Meaning CPU and GPU ? It may be possible to get a friend to bring over his card to test. Unfortunately the Gtx 580 is a hog in power and size and I don't know if anyone has the capacity to fit it into their system. I assume putting a different card into my system and running something for 2 hours or so would help me narrow things down as well.

Edit: I checked my 12v rail as I heard you can sometimes tell if a PSU is failing if you check the 12v with hwmoniter and it shows volts under 11 (while gaming). Anyways everything is good according to hwmoniter I'm operating at minimum 12.025 and max 12.075. Whether or not what ever is reporting these voltages is in working other and correct I do not know.


Edited by Gh0st78, 07 January 2016 - 12:53 AM.


#5 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 11:10 AM

That looks like a dead psu. Try replacing it.

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#6 technonymous

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 10:30 PM

Without having spare hardware to swap out there is no telling what could be the problem. I highly recommend taking it to a tech unless you can narrow it down with spare hardware. Voltages at 12.00 is fine and within spec. However, that means nothing. The PSU could still be bad and failing at heavier loads. Typically resulting in bad caps or mosfet transistors that have gone out of spec and are failing. The only true way to test a PSU is to put it on scope and bench test it under different loads. A electronics shop can do that. Video cards the same scenario. Heat, moisture/corrosion, bad caps, transistors, circuitry broken do to stress of the card warping thus breaking solder contacts. It could have walked out of the slot do to hot/cold expansion. It could be the PCIE slot itself. Again, something like that a computer repair shop would have the hardware diagnostic equipment to test bad slots. Sometimes pulling it and seat it again will fix it. Try a different slot if your mobo has one. Overall it can be something so simple and something difficult and trivial to pinpoint.






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