Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

When is the right time to migrate from one programming language to another?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Oyugi

Oyugi

  • Members
  • 18 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nairobi
  • Local time:12:55 AM

Posted 05 January 2016 - 05:22 PM

Hi all, i have been reading that a good programmer should be able to work with various programming languages, i also came across a post that was suggesting learning a particular language helps one transition to other languages with ease . if that is true where should i begin and what should i do to become an elite coder, a real professional, hate to say this but i just found out i'm kinda half baked code student. I used to float a lot in programming classes but i am working hard to get the best out of me. You as a professional programmer what did you do right to be where you are, guide me with a strategic plan and tell me what an aspiring programmer should be ready to do? Thanks.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 KingDavidlll

KingDavidlll

  • Members
  • 297 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:55 AM

Posted 05 January 2016 - 08:00 PM

I found the right time to migrate is when you need to do something that people say can be done well/much easier in a different language.  To be honest it is really easy to learn a new language as when you learn programming you shouldn't just be learning the syntax, but how the logic flows.  I found that most of the logic works the same, and the syntax changes.  Obviously when working with different devices you will have to learn different things, eg. learning C++ will be different to learning Android/PHP as some of the logic starts to get jumbled around, but switching between C++ and python should be relatively simple.

 

I would recommend first learning what each language is good for, and what it is bad for, then get an understanding of how each language you might have an interest in using, works.  That way if you do get asked to do a problem you can easily say what you would do and how you would do it.  Have a basic knowledge of the syntax and data structures and standard libraries and some of the common libraries.  Once you know that if you ever encounter a chance to work with it I'd say go for it.  

 

Note: I haven't had a huge amount of experience but hopefully this helps as it's what I do.



#3 Oyugi

Oyugi
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 18 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nairobi
  • Local time:12:55 AM

Posted 06 January 2016 - 03:20 AM

Thanks king, learnt a few things from that, will keep that in mind. I intend to start by learning python, then figure out the next one after mastering it. Haven't used it before but i hope it takes a short time to learn.

#4 KingDavidlll

KingDavidlll

  • Members
  • 297 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:55 AM

Posted 06 January 2016 - 11:13 PM

What tools are you thinking of using to learn it?  

 

Each different person uses their own ways, and you'll have to figure out what works best for you, but I can recommend some tools.

 

If you have already some programming knowledge using this:

Going through https://www.codecademy.com/learn/python and doing all the exercises, then following:

http://learnpythonthehardway.org/book/ex0.html

Doing a few short tasks from Euler

Then finding some real world problems and working out a solution for them.

 

Note: There isn't any way to master a programming language.  Sure you can become an expert on one and be good in a specific area, but there is multitudes amounts of knowledge out there and everyone has their own libraries they want to use and do things in a different way, and each way is good in their own way and so being good at picking which method is best for each scenario is something you'll have to learn.  I would recommend taking a step back and figuring out what you want to do with the language, what you want from learning it.  



#5 Oyugi

Oyugi
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 18 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nairobi
  • Local time:12:55 AM

Posted 07 January 2016 - 07:16 AM

I would love to develop simple financial applications that keep track of how people spend their money online, generate a history of payments they make and so on. Lets say very much applications that lean on finance and budgeting. My approach to learning this was by first decompiling  existing products ,study their code and then practice compiling the same application as i continue horning my skill through ebooks, tutorials and forums. Though i'm not sure if that is the best, i will definitely give your approach a try , it looks pretty good to me.



#6 Galadriel

Galadriel

    Bleepin Elf


  • Malware Response Team
  • 2,753 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Missouri, USA
  • Local time:03:55 PM

Posted 30 January 2016 - 01:35 AM

+1 to the codecademy recommendation. They really take you through step by step with the basics.

Just like any kind of learning, you will get as much out of the subject as you are willing to put in.

Also programming is not really about the language, but about a way of thinking and solving problems. It's about algorithms. If you can pseudocode solutions to simple problems, you can code them in just about any language given the time and documentation. Remember, the language is just a tool. A means to an end. The important part in programming is in breaking down problems into manageable chunks to solve them. The rest is just syntax.

 


I cemna prestar aen. Han mathon ne nen. Han mathon ne chae. A han noston ne 'wilith. - Galadriel
'The avatar is changed; I can feel it in the water, I can feel it in the earth, I can smell it in the air.'

Phear teh ceiling cat, for he is roofkittehd! - Basement Cat

I'm a Bleeping Folder, are you? - Join BC in the fight against diseases - Click here
Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook

#7 ChiefTech

ChiefTech

  • Members
  • 70 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oregon
  • Local time:01:55 PM

Posted 03 February 2016 - 01:40 AM

An aspiring programmer should understand the basic syntax similarities between various programming languages and adapt well while working between them.

All you need to know is basic programming fundamentals and you will be able to transition well between different languages. Some things are global. Like strings, longs, integers, etc.

My suggestion would be checking out a couple different languages and their popular IDEs.

Downloading the free version of Visual Studio Community would be a good start.

After you've checked out a couple then you should decide where you feel comfortable and what language best benefits your long term goals.

I started in Java and thought that's what I needed but then I moved on to c++. Then I decided c++ wasn't for me and went to vb6. Then I went to Python for awhile then to vb.net and then c#. All while making websites on the side in HTML. Then I decided c is where I wanted to be just to jump back to c#.

My point is a true programmer doesn't choose one language. They are diverse and understand how the basic logic works and can easily adapt to other languages by understanding the similarities in syntax.

And to answer your original question: Any time is the right time to make the jump. Don't limit yourself.

Edited by ChiefTech, 03 February 2016 - 01:59 AM.


#8 Oyugi

Oyugi
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 18 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nairobi
  • Local time:12:55 AM

Posted 15 February 2016 - 03:24 AM

Thanks ,never felt more enlightened like this before  guys, i surely have applied alot of your recommendations and im seeing alot of difference especially code academy, good stuff i must sayand sorry for the late reply.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users