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Triple boot partitioning


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#1 MadmanRB

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:12 PM

I am thinking of making a brand new triple boot scenario, I have three hard drives now that I can work with as I was able to rescue a 120GB HDD from a dead laptop, the disk is viable and works fine so it gives me some incentive to finally do my dream triple boot setup of windows 10, Linux mint and Manjaro.

Now windows is just too big to even considering moving it to this laptop drive.
As it stood before I had a 1 TB drive I was using for windows and gaming, a 750 GB HDD for linux but this new drive can serve as my new root and swap drive for both Mint and Manjaro.
Now I know sharing a home partition is a bad idea but it will give me so much room compared to what I have now.
But I am in the zone for suggestions, I could just set up a small home partition for either Manjaro and Mint and just label the 750GB HDD as storage but suggestions are welcome

Edited by MadmanRB, 04 January 2016 - 09:13 PM.

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#2 paul88ks

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:49 PM

 

As it stood before I had a 1 TB drive I was using for windows and gaming, a 750 GB HDD for linux but this new drive can serve as my new root and swap drive for both Mint and Manjaro.

Now I know sharing a home partition is a bad idea but it will give me so much room compared to what I have now.
But I am in the zone for suggestions, I could just set up a small home partition for either Manjaro and Mint and just label the 750GB HDD as storage but suggestions are welcome

Sharing a "Home"partition is NOT a bad idea,many users on here do it all the time.Depending on your PC specs- you don't need a large "Swap" partition unless you don't have a lot of memory. When i was learning how to triple boot- which i do now- I started off using a 10 gig "Swap" and soon realized i didn't need near that amount -even for multiple OS's. You are only using one at a time-so--. I sure there are others on here that will chime in soon with their opinions- do you know how to post a Specky?

 also - have you considered just using each hard drive for each OS's?
 


Edited by paul88ks, 04 January 2016 - 09:51 PM.


#3 MadmanRB

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:56 PM

 

 

As it stood before I had a 1 TB drive I was using for windows and gaming, a 750 GB HDD for linux but this new drive can serve as my new root and swap drive for both Mint and Manjaro.

Now I know sharing a home partition is a bad idea but it will give me so much room compared to what I have now.
But I am in the zone for suggestions, I could just set up a small home partition for either Manjaro and Mint and just label the 750GB HDD as storage but suggestions are welcome

Sharing a "Home"partition is NOT a bad idea,many users on here do it all the time.Depending on your PC specs- you don't need a large "Swap" partition unless you don't have a lot of memory. When i was learning how to triple boot- which i do now- I started off using a 10 gig "Swap" and soon realized i didn't need near that amount -even for multiple OS's. You are only using one at a time-so--. I sure there are others on here that will chime in soon with their opinions- do you know how to post a Specky?

 also - have you considered just using each hard drive for each OS's?
 

 

 

Well I never do keep a large swap, lately I have had it at 8GB but will lower it to 4.

As for Speccy:

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/U0irFnRJwGMRjrHvvKjINq5


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#4 Guest_hollowface_*

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 10:02 PM

Use the 1TB for Windows 10, the 750GB drive for data, and the 120 for Linux Mint and Manjaro. Don't bother with a home partition, just a root partition for each Linux distro (55GB each), and a shared swap partition (10GB). That'd be how I'd go. Don't save any data to the OS partitions, store it all on the dedicated storage drive (the 750GB drive).

 

Note: You don't need 10GB of swap with 8GB of ram, that's just how I would do it.


Edited by hollowface, 04 January 2016 - 10:04 PM.


#5 paul88ks

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 10:05 PM

 

149GB Western Digital WDC WD1600BEVT-22ZCT0 (SATA): 

30 °C
698GB Seagate ST3750528AS (SATA): 
28 °C
931GB Seagate ST1000DM003-1CH162 (SATA): 
28 °C
 
Optical Drives

4 is what i use ow - and you have plenty of RAM.if it were me,I would put Mint on the smaller Seagate drive(with Home and Swap) and put manjaro on the WD drive - I am assuming you have Win 10 on the terabyte drive?



#6 NickAu

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 04:48 AM

 

Well I never do keep a large swap, lately I have had it at 8GB but will lower it to 4.

I have 8 GiB ram and do not bother with swap at all.


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#7 cat1092

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 05:30 AM

The only reason why I have a 4GiB Swap partition is to stop VMware Workstation Player from giving me warnings from not enough........despite the fact I have 32GB of installed RAM. 

 

Prior to that, just had a 1GiB Swap on the end of my 1TiB data drive, the first half of which is used for Linux Mint /home. Root is on a SSD. With 8GB RAM, unless you're going to be running VM software or anything that requires heavy RAM usage, or use the hibernate option, 1GiB is plenty. 

 

Plus there's those like Nick above that has no Swap. This is good, because the RAM is forced to do what's it's designed for. HDD/SSD's are not intended to be used as a RAM substitute, plus the RAM is 25x faster than most consumer based SSD's are & 100x that of a HDD. That's exactly why some chooses to run RAMDisk software, is for the provided speed of programs such as those most frequently used, like browsers & games. Creating large Swap spaces are the same as a large Windows pagefile, these both serves the same purpose, making RAM become lazy, even my Windows installs has a minimum of 200MiB & 1024MiB max pagefile. 

 

The only other users that can use a bit more Swap are those with low amounts of RAM (1GB or less). These users can benefit from 1.5 to 2GiB of Swap space. 

 

As far as your drives goes, you have everything needed for a triple boot & then some. Really you can do it with the two larger drives alone, I've had a quad boot on a 160GiB HDD years back & none of the OS's were cramped for space. Though I stored items not needed on an external. 

 

Good Luck! :thumbup2:

 

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#8 Al1000

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 06:55 AM

Really you can do it with the two larger drives alone


That's what I was thinking. I recently replaced Kubuntu 14.04 32 bit with Kubuntu 14.04 64 bit on my desktop pc, and decided to use a 1TB WD black HDD that I had lying around which I'd never used, instead of the 500GB Seagate HDD I was using before for operating systems. I already have a reasonably new 1TB green HDD that I use for storage, so the older 500GB Seagate HDD became redundant.

My old Kubuntu installation was on a single 46GiB partition, which was around two-thirds full after 18 months or so, and the new one is on two 100GiB partitions. Which is probably overkill, particularly as I keep most of my files on the green HDD rather than in /home, but I have more than enough HDD space anyway.

As well as the green HDD for file storage, I also have a "Files" partition on /dev/sda8 that I use for similar purposes, mostly because that's how I had my Seagate HDD partitioned. Here's a screenshot I took after installing and setting up XP and Kubuntu on the new HDD. (I have still to (sort out then) transfer most of my files from the Files partition on my old HDD to the new one)

kubuntu_x64_1_zps2jwmuky6.png

So at the moment it's only dual-boot, but I plan on partitioning the remaining space into a 10GiB partition for Puppy, and a 50GiB partition for some other Linux distro when I decide what I want to try.

I used to have 3GiB of RAM and a 4GiB swap partition, but never saw more than a few hundred MiB of swap being used at the most. Since the computer now has 4GiB of RAM, I decided that a 2GiB swap partition would be plenty.

Ideally I might have put the Files partition at the end of the drive and swap closer to the end, but the HDD on my laptop has Linux operating systems on sda5 and sda7, swap on sda6 and a Files partition on sda8, and I wanted to keep this computer the same.

#9 pcpunk

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 06:29 PM

Just lost a post here so will be short - but wanted to chime in.  Some really good idea's here but I urge not to share "home" as you might run into issues sharing your home partition with more than one OS.  Some important "Personal Settings" are stored in "home".  Just create home for each separately, or like Hollowface suggested - go without and use one partition as "root" for all files.  

 

I only have 2gb of swap because as cat1092 said, I am not using VMware nor Hibernate.  You have a lot more room, and your needs might be different, but that advice has been covered. 

 

I will post my partitions for your pleasure!  Just noticed that my "home" Partition numbers are not correct and there are no labels, will have to fix that.

 

KDE-17.1-HP-Install_zpsukimlc1a.png


Edited by pcpunk, 05 January 2016 - 09:47 PM.

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#10 pcpunk

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 09:48 PM

Edited the above post to make more clear.


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#11 MadmanRB

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 11:02 PM

The only reason why I have a 4GiB Swap partition is to stop VMware Workstation Player from giving me warnings from not enough........despite the fact I have 32GB of installed RAM. 

 

Prior to that, just had a 1GiB Swap on the end of my 1TiB data drive, the first half of which is used for Linux Mint /home. Root is on a SSD. With 8GB RAM, unless you're going to be running VM software or anything that requires heavy RAM usage, or use the hibernate option, 1GiB is plenty. 

 

Plus there's those like Nick above that has no Swap. This is good, because the RAM is forced to do what's it's designed for. HDD/SSD's are not intended to be used as a RAM substitute, plus the RAM is 25x faster than most consumer based SSD's are & 100x that of a HDD. That's exactly why some chooses to run RAMDisk software, is for the provided speed of programs such as those most frequently used, like browsers & games. Creating large Swap spaces are the same as a large Windows pagefile, these both serves the same purpose, making RAM become lazy, even my Windows installs has a minimum of 200MiB & 1024MiB max pagefile. 

 

The only other users that can use a bit more Swap are those with low amounts of RAM (1GB or less). These users can benefit from 1.5 to 2GiB of Swap space. 

 

As far as your drives goes, you have everything needed for a triple boot & then some. Really you can do it with the two larger drives alone, I've had a quad boot on a 160GiB HDD years back & none of the OS's were cramped for space. Though I stored items not needed on an external. 

 

Good Luck! :thumbup2:

 

Cat

 

 

Well I had this hard drive in my position for a few months now, I got it from my mothers laptop and it is still relatively new-ish and its too low space to sell really.

I was just toying with idea to give myself more space and allow each linux I have breathing room.

Now that I am in the market for a new HDD this idea can be reversed of course


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#12 cat1092

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 02:18 AM

 

 

I was just toying with idea to give myself more space and allow each linux I have breathing room.

 

Do you plan on running virtual machines or some other task that requires lots of storage? 

 

I ask this because Linux, unlike Windows, doesn't hog a HDD's space, unless a lot of data is being stored on the system, or data partition(s) on these. Going over your Speccy specs again, that 698MiB HDD is a lot of room for two Linux installs, that's roughly 348GiB each, with 40GiB space for root (it doesn't grow a lot post install) & 308GiB for /home, where your personal data is stored, and for the sake of balancing things, a 2GiB Swap space between the two drives. Even with that, you could have 3-4 virtual machines & room for your files. /home is also where much of your configuration files for browsers & other software goes, these doesn't use a lot of space. 

 

I also agree there's not much value in a 160GiB HDD (when 1TiB ones are on promo for $45 or so), yet it can still be very useful for storing files that you don't want on your OS drives. It's certainly not dead weight & after formatting, there should still be around 149GiB left, I have a couple of these myself & another on the way with a PC purchased, plus a few 120 & 80GB drives. Most aren't gathering dust, rather being used to store files on, or used as backup drives for notebooks. A 160GiB HDD will hold about 3 backups of each of my lesser used notebooks, about 2 of my most used ones, this is why having a docking station is so sweet, one can reuse 2.5" & 3.5" HDD's for backups/other data storage. 

 

After taking a 2nd peek at your Speccy specs, if you really want to add a 3rd drive, IMO it should be a 250-500GiB SSD for Windows at a minimum, after creation of your Recovery Media set (if OEM PC) & imaging the entire HDD. There are some 250GiB models (though avoid Samsung EVO models like the plague) for $$69-79 or so on promo that reads at over 500MB/sec & writes in the upper 400MB/sec (or more). Both Crucial & SanDisk has some decent models in this price range. If the PC is under warranty still, leave the 1TiB HDD as is until it runs out, then use it as you please. The OS can be cloned to the SSD using Macrium Reflect, will have to run disk cleanup as Administrator to free up junk files, then move all of your personal documents to another drive & run a couple of defrag passes & using Disk Management, shrink the HDD as far as it'll go, & disable hibernation & System Restore. If by chance you can't shrink to 120GiB with the Windows tool, then use Mini Tool Partition Wizard Bootable ISO, can be used as a bootable USB stick or burned to CD, which can be booted to and a shrink can be forced, as long as there's no more than 120GB of data (preferably 80GiB or less) on the drive afterwards. Once Mini Tool is closed, remove the CD, the system will require one or two reboots. 

 

It's now ready to clone, unless you choose to install Windows fresh. 7 can take a long time with all of the needed updates, but I'm not likely telling anything you don't already know. It's just that many prefers a fresh install on a SSD. BTW, if a OEM PC, the Recovery partition can also be cloned to the SSD with Windows. After the mandatory reboot or two, reboot into Mini Tool Partition Wizard & mark Recovery as the Active partition, once you reboot, it'll load Windows factory fresh. :)

 

Then you can shrink the OS to 120GB, image your Recovery Partition to that 160GB HDD, and then delete it for the space for Linux. By doing this, it remains available for when needed. If you go with a 500GiB sized SSD, you can keep Recovery if desired, and allow more space for Windows (at least 250GiB), though using Mini Tool, move Recovery over to have at least 10% of free SSD space, then split the remainder as two Logical partitions for the root partitions for your Linux installs. Unlike Windows, Linux can boot from Logical partitions. 

 

If it's not a OEM install, then with a 250GB SSD, you can allocate 120GiB for Windows (more if 500GiB SSD is chosen), and 40GiB for each Linux root partition & have tons of space on the two larger drives for Linux /home, Swap & Windows data. This will leave some unformatted space at the end of the SSD, that's OK, as a rule of thumb, SSD OEM's recommends leaving about 10% free for the controllers to perform their duties better & will allow for best speed. You need not be concerned with partition alignment with Linux, the installer with make the necessary adjustments. Just be sure the drives are in place how you like them first, if you move anything, then Linux Swap will have to be repaired (or manually mount after every boot with GParted). 

 

You can then use the 160GiB HDD for storage of your most important files, photos & videos and we all have some. Often a docking station that mounts both 2.5" & 3.5" HDD/SSD's can be found for $25 or so on the Newegg site when on promo, if you're not on their list, you can sign right up for these to be delivered to your inbox with valuable discount codes that we cannot share here, per Forum rules. Link is a bit down the page, if you've never used their site, or haven't in some time. 

 

http://www.newegg.com/

 

Since you also have a Haswell CPU as I do, I felt it necessary to add the option of a SSD, it's the best 'bang for the buck' you can invest in your PC, the results are immediate & makes a powerful impact on everything you do with the PC. :thumbup2:

 

Plus since you have lots of HDD space as it is, there's no need to purchase another, you have enough space to install a couple more Linux OS's, with a /home partition for each, though if you want the root on a SSD, would need the 500GiB model for sure. These starts at $129 & up on promo, though $149 is the regular price for some models. Again, I cannot stress enough, stay away from Samsung EVO models, no matter how bold their claims are, they're junk & Samsung burned many of those who purchased many of the 840 series, shipping a software patch for a hardware read defect. Someone on this very forum, in this section, just stated the same as I a couple of days back. 

 

Good Luck, no matter what you do! :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 06 January 2016 - 02:42 AM.

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#13 MadmanRB

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 03:42 AM

No I have no interest in SSD's right now, 250GB is still a bit small for my needs and the 500GB ones are still too pricey.

I need space not speed

And this is my own custom rig, no OEM here except for the occasional drive or something I can rescue from another PC.


Edited by MadmanRB, 06 January 2016 - 03:43 AM.

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#14 wizardfromoz

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 04:05 AM

I go swapless and homeless, here's my partitioning:

 

OKr9aGX.png

 

Used to have Mageia 5 and Uberstudent 4.1 Epicurus on there too - just playing around at the moment, & about to put Vinux and Manjaro on.

 

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#15 cat1092

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 04:42 AM

No I have no interest in SSD's right now, 250GB is still a bit small for my needs and the 500GB ones are still too pricey.

I need space not speed

And this is my own custom rig, no OEM here except for the occasional drive or something I can rescue from another PC.

 

Great deal about the custom rig, was going to build around the same series of I5 myself, but when I seen the XPS 8700 with an i7, 12GB RAM & 1GB GDDR5 RAM at Costco for $699.99, couldn't pass it up. Couldn't have built the PC for that, let alone supply Windows, if I had to purchase it again. Fortunately, stocked up on Windows 7 OEM Home Premium when $69.99 & Pro when $89.99, so was able to immediately install Windows 7 Pro on a SSD purchased. 

 

Though the PC isn't stock any longer, now stuffed with it's max of 32GB, and on it's 2nd GPU since, a nVidia GTX 960, though had I known that Dell were testing the 970's, would had waited, a few of these are approved models for the 460W stock PSU. Huge difference between a 960 & 970, though after spending $320 on two GPU's, don't want to purchase another for new one awhile, though have a refurbished one arriving today with the baddest Core 2 Quad produced, am saving for my next PC, be it build or buy. :thumbup2:

 

It's good though, when one can take a premium off the shelf PC & upgrade it a bit, and see & feel the difference. I believe I'm up to a build, yet as above, hard to justify when an off the shelf one with a premium CPU is included, along with a PSU, though this is upgradable also, if one wants a killer GPU installed. Though many runs these just as out of the box. This is a PC buyer's market with the pricing of the last couple of years, when the deals are found. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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