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Advice on overclocking my cpu n' the gpu and choosing brand of RAM in my first b


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#1 Adjustable

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:11 AM

I've been really confused about a lot of stuff that I've read on different websites and the first problem is the following : How much power will I need if im intending to overclock both the cpu and the gpu like a beast later? Pc build : Mobo: Z87 G1 Sniper

Cpu: Intel I5-4690k

Gpu: Gtx 960 G1 Gaming 4GB windforce edition

RAM : Actually that's the second question which brand to go for? Im aiming for 8 gigs but the brand got me wondering.


One last thing and would be epic if someone could give his opinion: with the gpu listed above, how much FPS am I gonna get lets say in FC4 ultra setting on a 1080p monitor which I haven't decided yet what refresh rate to go for which depends on the previous question.

I know its a lot but I heard great stuff about the people here. Dont disappoint me guys! Thanks in advance.

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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:41 AM

There are a number of decent RAM brands, Corsair, Patriot, and Mushkin are a few that come to mind.  No matter what you get, run a memory tester overnight after your computer is built to make sure it works properly.

 

The GTX 960 is not a top-of-the-line GPU for gaming.  It certainly is a good card for a gaming build, but if you want to play newer games with all the eye candy turned up to max, a GTX 970, or better yet, a 980, would be one of the better choices.  If you go with this GPU, I suggest about 700W or more for the power supply.  If you are going to do 4K with high refresh rates, you'll need the best GPU you can get.  For just a high refresh rate, you'll still need a fairly high-end card.  Are you going to get one of the G-Sync enabled monitors?  I hear good things about the ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q monitor.


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#3 Adjustable

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:48 AM

There are a number of decent RAM brands, Corsair, Patriot, and Mushkin are a few that come to mind.  No matter what you get, run a memory tester overnight after your computer is built to make sure it works properly.
 
The GTX 960 is not a top-of-the-line GPU for gaming.  It certainly is a good card for a gaming build, but if you want to play newer games with all the eye candy turned up to max, a GTX 970, or better yet, a 980, would be one of the better choices.  If you go with this GPU, I suggest about 700W or more for the power supply.  If you are going to do 4K with high refresh rates, you'll need the best GPU you can get.  For just a high refresh rate, you'll still need a fairly high-end card.  Are you going to get one of the G-Sync enabled monitors?  I hear good things about the ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q monitor.


Look I will be plain truthful with you, im sticking to the 960 because the 970 is already like a 1000 pounds more in my country(Egypt) so I think playing on a non g-synced monitor since its expensive like absolute hell would be just too costly for me thats why im think about a descent 1080p monitor with a refresh rate of idk yet depending on the answer of how much fps will I get with the 960 would be awesome if you could give me some firm grounda since everyone is saying something different.

#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 10:09 AM

As far as your fps its hard to predict. There's a lot of variables, such as your CPU etc. And a lot depends on your skill with overclocking. On any case even assuming the best case scenario and you get the maximum overclock, your not likely to get the performance your hoping for out of that card, and with an overclock like that its not likely to last as long as it should.

If I was to make a guess, assuming you got a good high quality CPU and fast ram, even with a maximum overclock, I would imagine your probably be lucky to do a playable frame rate (30-40 fps) at medium settings. But that's a educated guess, looking at the games requirements. The ideal card for that game is either a nvidia 680 or 290, basically the performance ratio of a 970 or a r9 380. But like I said that's no more then a educated guess...I've never played that game, and I don't believe in overclocking. So take it for what it's worth.

Edited by the_patriot11, 04 January 2016 - 10:10 AM.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#5 Adjustable

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 10:14 AM

As far as your fps its hard to predict. There's a lot of variables, such as your CPU etc. And a lot depends on your skill with overclocking. On any case even assuming the best case scenario and you get the maximum overclock, your not likely to get the performance your hoping for out of that card, and with an overclock like that its not likely to last as long as it should.

If I was to make a guess, assuming you got a good high quality CPU and fast ram, even with a maximum overclock, I would imagine your probably be lucky to do a playable frame rate (30-40 fps) at medium settings. But that's a educated guess, looking at the games requirements. The ideal card for that game is either a nvidia 680 or 290, basically the performance ratio of a 970 or a r9 380. But like I said that's no more then a educated guess...I've never played that game, and I don't believe in overclocking. So take it for what it's worth.


Absolutely respecting your opinion but I disagree since there is a guy(wont say his name for advertising stuff) who uploads videos using the gtx 750 ti and actually booming it on ultra getting on most games 60+ fps but imagine using the 960 on them, pretty sure it would kill it but as everyone knows hardware companies try to convince people to buy the expensive stuff but after some research and reading 100+ reviews(yes I did that actually) I found that its really a bang for the buck or you have another opinion?

#6 the_patriot11

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 11:05 AM

First off unless I know the person personally I'm skeptical of many things...but also keep this in mind. It maybe possible to overclock that card fast enough to play anything... Keep in mind though that if your friend got 750 up with that performance I'm going to guess he's a skilled overclocked with some serious aftermarket cooling, that would be the only way to handle the heat. I'm getting the feeling (correct me if I'm wrong) that your not a experienced overclocker. And for the cost of the aftermarket cooling, to get a 750 to put out the performance you want, it would be cheaper to just buy a faster card. About the only reason to do it would be for bragging rights. I don't know if you would have to have as much of a overclock on 960 as you would a 750, but I still imagine aftermarket cooling a must for the performance your wanting.

Another thing to keep in mind is your CPU. If your CPU isn't performing as well as you GPU overclocking the GPU would be worthless, and overclocking the CPU for max performance is far easier, you will definitely need aftermarket cooling, and nice aftermarket cooling to unless you want a fried cpu/circuit board. Either liquid cooling or a decent sized heatsink.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#7 Adjustable

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 11:16 AM

First off unless I know the person personally I'm skeptical of many things...but also keep this in mind. It maybe possible to overclock that card fast enough to play anything... Keep in mind though that if your friend got 750 up with that performance I'm going to guess he's a skilled overclocked with some serious aftermarket cooling, that would be the only way to handle the heat. I'm getting the feeling (correct me if I'm wrong) that your not a experienced overclocker. And for the cost of the aftermarket cooling, to get a 750 to put out the performance you want, it would be cheaper to just buy a faster card. About the only reason to do it would be for bragging rights. I don't know if you would have to have as much of a overclock on 960 as you would a 750, but I still imagine aftermarket cooling a must for the performance your wanting.

Another thing to keep in mind is your CPU. If your CPU isn't performing as well as you GPU overclocking the GPU would be worthless, and overclocking the CPU for max performance is far easier, you will definitely need aftermarket cooling, and nice aftermarket cooling to unless you want a fried cpu/circuit board. Either liquid cooling or a decent sized heatsink.

Well indeed, you are correct, im not a skilled overclocker but now im really lost, should I wait a bit and get the 970? And about the cpu im thinking of, the i5-4760k.
Is it good enough to bear the duty of OCing both itself and the gpu?

#8 the_patriot11

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 12:51 PM

The CPU choice you picked is fine as long as you have good cooling with it. Personally I would save up for a 970, or if your not stuck on nvidis, a factory overclocked AMD R9 380. I'm running a sapphire nitro 380, with a factory overclock and 4 gigs of video ram. It's extremely fast, and already comes with improved cooling for overclocking, and I am very happy with its performance. I'm sure nvidia has factory overclocked models of their cards to, and usually they're not much more expensive, and come with better cooling from the factory.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#9 Adjustable

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 02:49 PM

The CPU choice you picked is fine as long as you have good cooling with it. Personally I would save up for a 970, or if your not stuck on nvidis, a factory overclocked AMD R9 380. I'm running a sapphire nitro 380, with a factory overclock and 4 gigs of video ram. It's extremely fast, and already comes with improved cooling for overclocking, and I am very happy with its performance. I'm sure nvidia has factory overclocked models of their cards to, and usually they're not much more expensive, and come with better cooling from the factory.

Well im planning on living on the turbo boost till I feel its a bit on the weak side then overclock it and I've made my mind to save up for the 970 although its a 1000 pounds more than the 960 but can u briefly tell me whats better in the 970 so I have it as a reference to some skeptics?

I really hate AMD cause of a really really bad experience with them so im totally done, nvidia has everything needed so why the heck not.

Just a little edit: I checked out the AMD card you said up and its about the same price as the gtx 960. At least in my country. And about the clock speed its much less(I know the memory bus is 256 bit but I dont think it would matter that much. Correct if im wrong)

Edited by Adjustable, 04 January 2016 - 02:55 PM.


#10 the_patriot11

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 04:52 PM

The 380 I'm running has a 1010 ghz GPU clock and a 5800 mhz memory clock....pretty fast.

As far as the differences between the 960 and the 970, to be honest with you I'm the opposite of you I'm AMD guy. I run nvidia in some of my builds but not my performance builds. It's not that I think ones better then the other, its just preference. In my experience nvidia does great for framerate-usually far better then AMD. However, AMD usually provides the better image quality, which I personally prefer. It's all a preference thing.

As far as the difference between the 960 and the 970, keep in mind there's more to look for then click speed. Many of the 970s I'm finding have a slower clock speed then the 960s but will still blow them out of the water, same with a 380 vs a 960. You got to look at core architecture, as well as cuda cores (nvidia thing) and stream processors. And memory and memory clock speed. You can get 970s and 380s with 4 gigs of video memory-a almost unheard of option among low end cards.

Another thing to consider is cooling. Especially if you looking at a name brand card such as EVGA and ASUS, the mid range on up has better cooling, often designed for overclocking if you want to go that route, a lot better then most low end cards. There are some 960s that have better cooling, but not as many as 970s. Either way you should check out the cooling before buying to make sure its adequate.

Beyond that, like I said I'm not really a nvidia guy. Perhaps DJBpace will give you a more precise answer as to the differences.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#11 Adjustable

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 05:04 PM

The 380 I'm running has a 1010 ghz GPU clock and a 5800 mhz memory clock....pretty fast.

As far as the differences between the 960 and the 970, to be honest with you I'm the opposite of you I'm AMD guy. I run nvidia in some of my builds but not my performance builds. It's not that I think ones better then the other, its just preference. In my experience nvidia does great for framerate-usually far better then AMD. However, AMD usually provides the better image quality, which I personally prefer. It's all a preference thing.

As far as the difference between the 960 and the 970, keep in mind there's more to look for then click speed. Many of the 970s I'm finding have a slower clock speed then the 960s but will still blow them out of the water, same with a 380 vs a 960. You got to look at core architecture, as well as cuda cores (nvidia thing) and stream processors. And memory and memory clock speed. You can get 970s and 380s with 4 gigs of video memory-a almost unheard of option among low end cards.

Another thing to consider is cooling. Especially if you looking at a name brand card such as EVGA and ASUS, the mid range on up has better cooling, often designed for overclocking if you want to go that route, a lot better then most low end cards. There are some 960s that have better cooling, but not as many as 970s. Either way you should check out the cooling before buying to make sure its adequate.

Beyond that, like I said I'm not really a nvidia guy. Perhaps DJBpace will give you a more precise answer as to the differences.


Well sir, I cant thank you and the gentleman above enough for the ton of info in such a brief period but my last concern to be sure im leaving confident is what cooling are you talking about? I didnt know that there are physical fans or coolers in generals that can be hooked up to the gpu, thought its just the 3x fans available on the 960 or 970 as an example. And if it was like that wouldnt the 3x windforce edition work like a charm?

#12 the_patriot11

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 05:11 PM

Probably... Like I said I'm not an nvidia guy...also not am overclocker. I look at the size of the radiators, how many cooling pipes and what type, size. Fans, ball bearings, etc. I prefer the factory overclocked cards because they often put better cooling stuff on them for overclocking.

There's also third party coolers, everything from heatsinks to liquid cooling.... Just depends on how much your willing to spend.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.





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