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Windows 10 installed, can I also install windows 7?


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#1 christosathens

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 11:01 AM

Hello, I recently purchased a laptop that has Windows 10 installed from manufacturer (HP) in its ssd hard drive.

Laptop has also another Hard disk drive, 1TB capacity. Can I also install windows 7 in the second hard disk drive, and keep the Windows 10 in the ssd? I would like to choose which windows will load, when booting the laptop. Thank you



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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 12:37 PM

Yes, that is definitely something that you can do. Many people dual-boot or even multi-boot, but you will have to buy a license for Windows 7. These are pretty cheap and can be had easily, but make sure you buy a license that comes with installation media. After that, we can walk you through the process.


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#3 britechguy

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 12:57 PM

Rocky,

 

          But, can he do this in the manner proposed?  I thought a dual-boot required that both OSes reside on the same boot device, the SSD in this case.

 

          It's certainly possible to set up a machine to dual boot (or multi-boot), but don't all of the OSes reside on the same drive?  [I'll be happy to be corrected, this is just the only way I thought it could be set up to work.]


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#4 dannyboy950

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 01:45 PM

I have to agree with Brian.  While I have multi booted on a number of machines they only had one drive.

I would have to guestion whether a bios would even be able to support this.

Unless it came on the origional machine would it even be in the bios device list?  Personally I know of no way to add a foreign device to that list at all.

 

Actually I have no example to compare to that I can think of.


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#5 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 02:04 PM

I am not technically trained, but right now I am triple booting on three different drives. I have Windows 10 on a Crucial 128 Gb SSD, Linux Mint on a Crucial 256 Gb SSD, and Ubuntu on a partition residing on an old Western Digital 1 terabyte HDD. I set up this triple boot this way because it suits my needs. All of my files and data are stored on mirrored external 3 terabyte desktop drives. This set-up works for my needs. Prior to this, I dual booted Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 on separate drives, but that was months ago when the preview for Windows 10 allowed that without a separate license.


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#6 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 02:10 PM

I have to agree with Brian.  While I have multi booted on a number of machines they only had one drive.

I would have to guestion whether a bios would even be able to support this.

Unless it came on the origional machine would it even be in the bios device list?  Personally I know of no way to add a foreign device to that list at all.

 

Actually I have no example to compare to that I can think of.

 

 

As far as BIOS settings, that was a little tricky for me to figure out because I could not find much documentation online to guide me. I built this computer in 2015, and it is using an Asus Z-97A motherboard and an Intel i5 4690 CPU. The BIOS is UEFI with something called fast boot. Every link to dual booting and multi-booting always says to disable the UEFI option and switch to something called legacy. With my particular wants and needs, this never worked. So I left UEFI enabled and disabled fast boot. This worked. Another thing I did was to actually physically disconnect the drives that already had an OS on them every time that I installed a new OS, and then I plugged all the drives back into the motherboard and set-up a boot loader through Linux. It was fun and educational.


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#7 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 03:58 PM

Just a footnote to my above statements.

When I built this computer in Feb. 2015, I didn't have any experience at all with computers. I was watching the news and I saw a report about Windows 10, so I thought that it would be a good time to get rid of my old computer and get a new one. I was just going to buy a new computer, but then I had a wild hair to build my own. Originally this computer had Windows 8, which I immediately upgraded to Windows 8.1 and I began exploring options for Windows 10. I originally just installed Windows 10 and that was it, I played with that for awhile until I figured that I still had a good license for Windows 8.1.

 

When I originally decided to dual boot, I didn't know how to go about it, but I had an ISO for Windows 10 and an installation disc for Windows 8, so in my mind I figured that the easiest way was on two separate drives. That was a long time ago, when I had absolutely no experience at all with computers. I set my two Windows systems up in separate drives and I used my BIOS to switch back and forth between the different operating systems. That is before I heard of Windows boot managers and stuff like that.

 

That was fun for a few months until I lost interest in Windows 8.1, and then I switched one of my drives over to Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon, and added the grub boot manager, that was much easier than using my BIOS menu to switch back and forth between different operating systems. I have had my pitfalls, I have lost a few operating systems here and there and a few boot partitions, but in the end it was just a self-guided adventure. I am at the point now where at any time I can change any one OS out without physically disconnecting any drives. Recently I switched out my 3rd hard drive from openSUSE 42 to Ubuntu without any effect at all on the other two operating systems. I can also change my Windows 10 whenever I want without effecting my Linux installs. For example I recently upgraded my Windows 10 from the Threshold build to the Redstone build. If I get tired of the Redstone build, I can go right back to the Threshold build without effecting the other two drives.

 

I have my Ubuntu on an approx. 300 GB partition of a 1 terabyte hard drive because I use the 700 gb partition as my main storage for all 3 operating systems. That was a real trick to figure out and implement, but it works like a charm. I use my two desktop drives simply as mirrored back ups for all of my data. Again, this was all self-guided, I could not find documentation online to guide me to where I envisioned this computer to be. I can also access my 2 desktop drives from any operating system, that was fun to figure out.

 

It is my computer. I built it for fun and I am having fun.


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#8 dannyboy950

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 04:05 PM

Interesting to say the least.  Never tried a multi boot on anything but windows systems. and never with different drives.  Nice to know it can be done.

Sometimes you just have to try things on your own. OJT so to speak.  Can be fun and also sometimes very frusterateing.


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