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My screen is black after I overclocked my CPU


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#1 Zeekers

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Posted 01 January 2016 - 05:33 AM

Hi, I bought a PC in 2008, as far as I can remember, the BIOS is from 1984-ish, and it has a Pentium 4 w/ 1GB of RAM. I was just going through the BIOS stuff, didn't change anything at all, except for the clock speed.

 

I raised it by 10, and then I rebooted it. After it rebooted, nothing showed on the monitor, even though everything else (such as the cooling fan) works.

 

I tried to remove the CMOS battery, but I just couldn't find it, and I don't know what motherboard it is, since it doesn't say anywhere.

 

Oh, and it was originally running Windows XP, but I upgraded it to Windows 7 Service Pack 1.



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#2 Zeekers

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Posted 01 January 2016 - 06:54 AM

Oh, and if anyone is suggesting it's the RAM, can you give me picture of what a RAM looks like?



#3 ranchhand_

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Posted 01 January 2016 - 02:13 PM

Power down and unplug the power cord on the back.

Open the side of the case; sometimes it can be a bit tricky to find the release tabs, and there will be between 1 and 2 thumb or standard screws on the rear. Usually it is the right side (or, facing the front, your left side) panel, but it could be the other side.

The motherboard ("mobo" for short) is the (usually green) large, flat circuit board at the bottom that everything else plugs in to. On that board will be a small, silver, flat "button" about the size of a nickle-that is the CMOS battery. Holding it in is a small wire tab. Use a small screwdriver to move that wire away, or up, or whatever and the battery will pop out. Note the polarity, usually the printing on the surface faces up. With the battery out, press the power start button on the front panel and hold it for 5 seconds. Wait for 10 minutes. Now snap the battery back in (don't reverse polarity!), make sure you haven't bumped or accidentally loosened any connection cables, replace the side panel, plug in the power cable, and boot.

Let us know how it goes.

Side thought.... overclocking, especially a unit that old, is a risky thing. Those old mobos were not designed for overclocking, and I am not sure if that CPU will overclock or not. Modern computers are almost overclocked constantly and designed for it. In your computer's era they were not, and blowing a CPU by attempting an OC was not uncommon. Only the fanatic geeks attempted it.

Another side thought....if your computer clock will not hold the proper  year, month and date settings it is time to replace that battery with a same type.


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#4 Zeekers

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 09:01 AM

I know the CMOS battery is a flat battery, but I couldn't find it anywhere.



#5 ranchhand_

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 06:26 PM

Please post the make & model of your computer.

Here are two pics of CMOS batteries:

The Silver color (with the red arrow pointing to it) is typical of most.

 the black one is just a holder for the battery inside and is rare, but occasionally I will come across one (red arrow pointing to the black battery, with a red letter D).

Attached File  Snap 2016-01-04 at 05.17.12.jpg   132.72KB   0 downloads

 

You definitely have a battery, it is there.


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#6 Zeekers

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 03:03 AM

It's a Powerlogic Futura Series, not sure about the model number, though.


Should I just post a picture of the motherboard?



#7 ranchhand_

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 10:23 AM

You can try, not sure if I will be able to discern anything depending on the image.


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#8 ScathEnfys

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 10:33 PM

What exactly did you adjust while overclocking? The multiplier or the BCLK frequency? If you adjusted the multiplier to 10 higher than normal, you might already have a cooked CPU... Additionally, some motherboards have a jumper pin to reset the CMOS, which is always an option if you can't find the battery.
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#9 Zeekers

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 09:57 AM

I think it was the BLCK frequency ._.



#10 ScathEnfys

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 10:05 AM

Adjusting BCLK can be dangerous if you don't know what you're doing because it affects fare more than the CPU. BLCK influences CPU frequency, Memory Frequency, and the speed of the PCI bus just to name a few things. The best option for you would be to clear the CMOS by either unplugging the battery or looking for the CLR_CMOS jumper and shorting it. I strongly recommend you look up a guide for overclocking (overclock.net is typically a good resource) so you know the limits of your hardware under ordinary conditions. (there are ways to increase the limits but I'm not going to discuss them here as they are highly impractical.)

Try to clear the CMOS and let us know how it goes, ok?
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