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A Question about Linux and Drivers


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#1 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 06:36 PM

I have an ASUS laptop, Windows 7.  It has serious issues with the touchpad software.  Three times now my computer suddenly becomes completely unstable, moves erradically, latches onto objects, move/deletes files, etc.  ASUS tells me to reinstall and that fixes the problem...for a while. 

 

If I install a Linux OS (Umbuntu?), would that resolve my touchpad software issue?  I have been thinking of migrating to Linux and this would be a great opportunity because this is an extra computer and I could take my time familiarizing myself with Linux.

 

Thanks.



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#2 wizardfromoz

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 03:51 AM

Hi LittleGreenDots, and :welcome: to the Linux side of the site!

 

 

If I install a Linux OS (Umbuntu?), would that resolve my touchpad software issue?

 

Not necessarily. A diagnostic and remedial tool you could use is called "xinput".

 

If you have a LiveCD/USB with Ubuntu (sic) on it, you could fire it up, then go to Terminal (if using Ubuntu with the Unity desktop that would be found in the Dash top left corner, start typing "Terminal".

 

In Terminal type and enter

xinput

and report back the output.

 

In my case, on a Toshiba Satellite, it looks like this:

 

BvNm7hG.png

 

My problem is with the touch screen, id=10, does similar with what you describe.

 

I type in

xinput disable 10

and Enter, and the problem stops for the session I am in.

 

My problem used to happen in Windows 8.1 as well, which this unit shipped with, before I blew it away and put 4 Linux Distros on it.

 

In your case, you would identify the touchpad and use that "id" instead of mine.

 

I have other, longer term solutions for getting the effect to stick, but have to go for New Year's Eve in Oz, now.

 

Back next 24, & keep it in mind to dip your toes in the Linux pool, the water is warm.

 

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#3 MadmanRB

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 07:06 AM

Usually linux hardware detection is pretty decent, however if this is a hardware issue as opposed to a OS issue linux is a good choice in seeing if its just windows that has this problem.

Just dual boot so that if you still want windows you can have it and use linux in determining if the touchpad is on the fritz.


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#4 pcpunk

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 04:52 PM

I have an ASUS laptop, Windows 7.  It has serious issues with the touchpad software.  Three times now my computer suddenly becomes completely unstable, moves erradically, latches onto objects, move/deletes files, etc.  ASUS tells me to reinstall and that fixes the problem...for a while. 

 

If I install a Linux OS (Umbuntu?), would that resolve my touchpad software issue?  I have been thinking of migrating to Linux and this would be a great opportunity because this is an extra computer and I could take my time familiarizing myself with Linux.

 

Thanks.

 

I have a non-technical idea lol.  What if you re-install 7 and shut down any Driver Updates from ASUS or anyone associated with the TouchPad etc.  You might have to make adjustments in Update Manager also, and only accept Important Security Updates.  Then come over to the "Dark Side" and install Linux!

 

I'm no computer Wiz - but if they are saying that fixes it for a while, then it could be some Updates that are breaking things.  These might be setup to come through ASUS automatically.


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#5 cat1092

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 05:11 AM

Sometimes these issues are hardware related & if so, a Linux install alone won't fix whatever's wrong. 

 

In your case, if possible, disable the trackpad & use a wireless mouse instead. That's what I do on all of my notebooks & often the keyboard too, usually purchased as a combo, as I find the trackpads & keyboards not to be consistent, some won't be sensitive enough, others will move with next to no effort (seems that's your issue). This can at least get you going to find a solution w/out the trackpad being unpredictable, plus it should be of serious concern when files are auto deleted by using it, way too sensitive or outright defective hardware. 

 

Good Luck with finding a solution! :)

 

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#6 pcpunk

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 11:17 AM

ASUS tells me to reinstall and that fixes the problem...for a while. 

 

If I install a Linux OS (Umbuntu?), would that resolve my touchpad software issue?  I have been thinking of migrating to Linux and this would be a great opportunity because this is an extra computer and I could take my time familiarizing myself with Linux.

 

Thanks.

 

I had a similar issue with XP especially while using I.E. and now linux has no such issues, so hopefully, linux, in this case will make life easier.

 

"If I install a Linux OS (Umbuntu?)"  What's Umbuntu? LOL just kidding, it 's "Ubuntu"


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#7 Al1000

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 12:03 PM

If I install a Linux OS (Umbuntu?), would that resolve my touchpad software issue?


I recommend booting your computer with a live Linux DVD/CD/USB and playing about with the settings for the touchpad. In Kubuntu there is a plethora of touchpad settings, including for sensitivity, in System Settings --> Hardware --> Input Devices --> Touchpad Settings. There is bound to be something similar (or the same) in Ubuntu.

#8 pcpunk

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 01:05 PM

I always suggest Linux Mint for beginners though Ubuntu's are just as popular.  It would be best to take a look at your specs to get the best OS for your pc.  Don't hesitate to ask before you install or run the LinuxLiveSession, it might save you some Big headaches.  I will leave you with this Tutorial that covers many things to get you started.  It's Ubuntu which Linux Mint and others are based on so things might look a little different but the mechanics are the same.  Just Browse over it first to see what applies to your situation.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LiveCD

 

Posting Specs is optional of course but very helpful.  You can start here if you want the challenge of using the software called Speccy from Piriform that works in Windows only.  It can be a little confusing so if you have any questions post back:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/323892/publish-a-snapshot-using-speccy/#entry1797792

 

Or, while in a LinuxLiveDVD-USB Session you can use these Terminal Commands to get the general Specs of your pc.  This is much easier than Speccy but Linux Style.

 

Open the Terminal while in LinuxLiveSession, and type one of these commands and hit Enter:

For LinuxMint Distros use:  inxi -Fxz

For Ubuntu Releases use:  sudo lshw -short

 

Then Highlight the outcome in Terminal, Right Click "Copy", then "Paste" the outcome to the beginning of your Threads, or in this Thread.  You can also "Save" this to a Word document while in LinuxLiveDVD-USB to your personal files on a USB/Flash Drive for use at any time someone asks for Specs.  

 

Go to Menu > Office > LibreOffice Writer, AbiWord or what ever Word processor you see there, Paste the outcome to Document > Go To "File", Top Left Drop-down, Choose "Save As" > Type in File Name at Top > Choose File Destination, USB Should be seen in the Left Pane > Choose Drop-down at Bottom Right  that says "All Formats" > Scroll down and choose the proper "File Type" Ending in (.doc) for Windows XP and earlier, and (.docx) for all After XP.  Or even "Open Office XML Text (.docx)" if using AbiWord or Open Offfice. 

 

pcpunk out


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#9 pcpunk

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 01:29 PM

Any corrections or suggestions on this Tutorial just PM me please, thank you!


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#10 cat1092

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 06:03 AM

 

If I install a Linux OS (Umbuntu?), would that resolve my touchpad software issue?


I recommend booting your computer with a live Linux DVD/CD/USB and playing about with the settings for the touchpad. In Kubuntu there is a plethora of touchpad settings, including for sensitivity, in System Settings --> Hardware --> Input Devices --> Touchpad Settings. There is bound to be something similar (or the same) in Ubuntu.

 

 

There are these settings on Linux Mint MATE & I imagine Cinnamon also, as well as their KDE & Xfce versions. 

 

Probably most any Ubuntu based distro has these settings included by default & easy to find. 

 

Cat


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#11 raw

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Posted 03 January 2016 - 08:38 PM

 

In your case, if possible, disable the trackpad & use a wireless mouse instead.

 

+1 Try this first :thumbup2:


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#12 ScathEnfys

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 08:46 PM

To rule out a driver / virus issue I would recommend using a Linux liveCD, such as the Ubuntu installer. You can use the 'demo' option to play around in a Linux system without having to repartition.
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#13 wizardfromoz

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 01:12 AM

@ScathEnfys:

 

Hi, and :welcome: to BC and the Linux side. 21 Posts in 4 hours, that's impressive.

 

@ScathEnthys and Others:

 

The OP has not been active since New Year's Eve, and that is understandable, given the Season. At the same time, he is a Member since 2009, so will undoubtedly be back soon.

 

Meantime, without further information, we are simply speculating.

 

Whilst all suggestions above have merit, the simplest and easiest step to take is the xinput one I suggested at #2, simply a Terminal command, and see if it remedies the problem, for the short-term, under a Linux environment, if only Live. If it DOES, then the OP has the option to install Linux and dual-boot, then work to fix the problem from within Linux.

 

Another option available, if the OP chooses to exercise a choice of Ubuntu, is to install a WUBI setup that will run from Windows, and work from there with the troubleshooting.

 

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#14 cat1092

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 01:16 AM

ScathEnfys,  :welcome: to the Linux section of Bleeping Computer Forums! :)

 

Sounds like a good idea to try, nothing to lose in doing so. Though over the years, I've found that until adjusting, a Linux install may make the trackpad more sensitive then normal. Have never tried adjusting while in Live Mode, or demo, to see if it helps or not. 

 

Hopefully the OP will return to address the issue. :)

 

Enjoy the forum, we have a lot to offer here :thumbup2:

 

Cat


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#15 cat1092

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 01:40 AM

 

 

Another option available, if the OP chooses to exercise a choice of Ubuntu, is to install a WUBI setup that will run from Windows, and work from there with the troubleshooting.

 

This may be a good idea under three conditions.  :)

 

1) Fully image the drive first to ensure that there's no mistakes made.

 

2) Make sure (if not a SSD) to run a couple of defrag passes, my first taste of Linux was via WUBI, and this left my HDD in a 55% fragmented state, reducing performance big time for both OS's. Back in early 2009, this wasn't included in the documentation, otherwise may have created a partition just for WUBI. 

 

3) Go light on the extra software, and no 'cleaners' (more below on this). 

 

Either less folks are using WUBI, or it's a well worn out idea by now, as I rarely see anymore of these tutorials nor do I see the option on the install media. Back in 2009, it was a big deal, attempting to lure users to Linux, and it worked. Had I not seen these articles, would have never thought to try Linux, only thing was that I made one fatal mistake that I know now how to correct, bootloader repair. Running 'cleaners' from within WUBI is an outright dangerous thing to do. 

 

The really odd thing in my case was Ubuntu was an installed program within XP, yet I couldn't boot into that OS, only Ubuntu. Computer Janitor messed up the boot loader, and like I stated above, know what to do to fix it now, but didn't then, and the worst part was that it was a new, yet to be imaged, install. So I made 3 mistakes, didn't defrag first, didn't backup, and finally the install of a cleaning app within Ubuntu. 

 

To sum things up on this, cleaners aren't needed on Linux OS's, because these doesn't leave 2-3GiB of files to delete post install. Maybe 300-400MiB & that's it. The only thing that will need cleanup from time to time is the browser, and both Firefox & Google Chrome has an option to perform cleaning of built up temporary Internet files, the cache, cookies & more. Much safer than any cleanup utility can do. 

 

Cat


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