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New Windows 10 computer vulnerable...


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#1 LMurphy001

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 02:56 PM

I bought a MS Surface Pro 4 yesterday: I bought the model with 4GB RAM, i5 processor, and 128GB ssd storage drive.

 

I read that "Windows Defender" is now considered an Anti-virus, so I felt secure and went on with browsing, downloading programs, installing Firefox add-ons. Running programs off the net that I usually use, but also some new ones I haven't used before.

 

Then I read late last night that Windows Defender is not such a great Anti-virus program and I'm not freaking out.

 

So I would like to:

 

1) Reformat disk or rollback or reset or do a recovery my Windows 10 operating system. I don't know if I can do a Factory reset or reformat the internal drive because I think it installed firmware update(s). 

 

I have a new USB 3.0 USB thumb drive (32GB), if needed. I need step-by-step instructions  for how to revert the OS back to as safe a place as possible. I have no data to back up, so that's not an issue (system is too new). The OS is 64 Bit Windows 10 Pro.

 

How do I proceed with this step? I opened disk management and noticed there are 3 partitions on the drive:

 

The first partition says: 260MB Healthy (EFI System Partition).

The second partition says: 117.96GB NTFS Windows (C:) Healthy (Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition)

The third partition says: 920MB Healthy (Recovery Partition)

 

This is the step that's most complicated for me to figure out, where I need the most help.

 

2) After the reset/recovery, I would do Windows Updates again. This requires getting on the Internet. Probably via the WiFI network, unfortunately. There is no Ethernet jack on this computer. I bought the dock which has Ethernet jack, but that may require driver installation the first time I plug it in.

 

Should I buy and install Anti-Virus protection first?

 

Pros: I'm more protected during that extended period when updates are being downloaded from the Internet and installed.

 

Cons: Potential for some updates to fail if live AV protection is enabled, and the Windows Updates can take longer if the AV program is real-time verifying all the updates as they are happening.

 

Do you normally install your AV and leave it running before or after the first set of Windows Updates after a fresh install?

 

3) Next, buy and install ESET NOD32 Antivirus. See rationale for getting the less featured product below.

 

4) Install Malware Bytes Anti-malware Free, and possibly the Anti-Exploit Free app too. Do I need both? (I haven't educated myself yet on the difference between them.)

 

5) Check for more Windows updates.

 

6) Install Firefox, Firefox plug-ins and other applications I use.

 

7) Then what? Set up backup? What other steps to take to secure my computer?

 

THANK YOU!

-LMurphy

 

______________________________________________

 

Note: Rationale for using ESET NOD32 AV instead of more fully featured ESET Multi-Device Security product:

 

I think the regular NOD32 AV uses less resources, and is probably good enough. The Multi-Device Security product has a lot more features in it, but could take up more space on my 128GB drive in the long run, or it may create noticeable performance delays on the i5/4GB RAM Windows 10 system. Does anyone recommend the extra features of ESET Multi-Device Security?

 

I am using one of the Bitdefender products on another computer and I find it very intrusive, and also seems to take up a LOT of disk space on my C: partition, and that's going to open another can of worms on that other system soon.

 

I do intend to use this computer for banking and on-line shopping, but I use a stand-alone password vault program to encrypt and hold my account information. I won't need that feature from the ESET product.

 

Although I have Android devices, the free ESET app seems to be the same as the paid except I get reminders to download definition updates instead of auto-updates of definitions. Also the free one doesn't remind me to scan my device; the paid one can be scheduled to scan on a regular basis. I avoid doing financial transactions on Android devices as much as humanly possible.

 



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#2 LMurphy001

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 03:51 PM

Attached: what I see in Update & Security

 

 

 

 

Attached Files



#3 britechguy

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Posted 29 December 2015 - 04:17 PM

Windows Defender is a fine anti-virus and millions use it (including myself at the moment).  I believe I saw the post that's made you nervous, and all I can say is ignore it.

 

Anti-virus programs don't, really, prevent you from getting viruses as much as they clean them up when you do (with the exception of the download scanning on e-mail or other files, which at least helps).  Your own web browsing and link clicking habits are a far better prevention than anything else.

 

Everyone has a different opinion on which antivirus program is the best, and I've used most of the majors:  AVG, Avast!, Panda Cloud, Microsoft Security Essentials (WIn7 and earlier), Windows Defender (Windows 8 and later), Clamwin, and others.   They all perform their basic functions well, even a "bad" antivirus is much, much, much better than none.  Windows Defender is not a bad antivirus, though it may not have the absolute highest detection rates on various testing benchmarks.

 

If your system is fine then I'd advise you to leave well-enough alone or, if you simply must have a different antivirus, acquire one and install it.  There is no reason to believe your system is at risk based on what you've offered and you're going ballistic without any good reason.  You've had Windows Defender enabled by default from the moment Windows 10 was installed if another antivirus program was not detected as running.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#4 AngryRaisin

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 04:09 AM

Sure you can always do a factory reset but if you if have not been doing risque computer use then it is highly unlikely that your computer has been comprised in any way.

 

And so far from this post you seem like you've walked yourself out on a ledge.

 

but... if you are determined... boot into advanced startup and restore from system image..

 

or if paranoia has set in then - http://winsupersite.com/windows-10/how-download-recovery-images-surface-book-and-surface-pro-4 


Edited by AngryRaisin, 30 December 2015 - 04:18 AM.


#5 Adam Pollard

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 06:33 AM


Then I read late last night that Windows Defender is not such a great Anti-virus program and I'm not freaking out.

 

So I would like to:

 

1) Reformat disk or rollback or reset or do a recovery my Windows 10 operating system. I don't know if I can do a Factory reset or reformat the internal drive because I think it installed firmware update(s). 

 

 

I think your massive overreaction IS freaking out. What's the panic? Windows Defender has performed poorly in some tests but it isn't malware and in your very long post, you haven't posted anything suggesting you have malware. Why all the excessive information about your system specs etc? It's not relevant. As others have said, online behaviour is the best way to avoid getting malware. I would use a better antivirus than Defender though.


Edited by Adam Pollard, 30 December 2015 - 06:33 AM.


#6 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 07:14 AM

I have been using Windows 10 for about a year now and I only run Windows Defender as my only defence. It works well for me, but I don't hang around in seedy neighbourhoods.


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#7 britechguy

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 09:14 AM

LMurphy001 wrote: "Then I read late last night that Windows Defender is not such a great Anti-virus program and I'm not freaking out."

 

From the beginning I thought that "not" was a typo for "now."   There's no other description than "freaking out" for this reaction.  Hence my attempt to walk the OP in from the metaphorical ledge that Angry Raisin so accurately detected he or she is standing on.

 

Repurposing Gertrude Stein's famous observation on Oakland, CA:  There's no there there.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#8 Willabong

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 10:16 AM

It is essential to have a good Malware program as well as Windows Defender, because NO anti Virus software is perfect, below are links to two of the best!

 

MalwareByte:    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/malwarebytes-anti-malware/

 

SuperAntiSpyware:   http://www.superantispyware.com

 

 

Just download the FREE versions, update the definitions regularly, and run one or both every couple of weeks.



#9 britechguy

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 10:28 AM

Willabong,

 

           We are going to have to agree to disagree, at least with regard to frequency of running.   I keep MBAM on all of my computers and install same when doing setup for my clients as well.  I do not, however, run it on any regular basis, just every once in a while.

 

           While it won't hurt, that's for sure, if you don't have any signs or symptoms of possible malware infection running that software doesn't do anything.  It's meant as an emergency correction tool, it's not a preventive measure in any realistic sense.  MBAM is without doubt an excellent tool and many love SuperAntiSpyware as well.  I don't know whether SuperAntiSpyware has immunization/inoculation functions because I haven't used it.

 

            As an actual inoculation against potential spyware I far prefer Spywareblaster from Brightfort.  It uses mechanisms to prevent infection before it happens.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#10 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 10:30 AM

LMurphy001 wrote: "Then I read late last night that Windows Defender is not such a great Anti-virus program and I'm not freaking out."

 

From the beginning I thought that "not" was a typo for "now."   There's no other description than "freaking out" for this reaction.  Hence my attempt to walk the OP in from the metaphorical ledge that Angry Raisin so accurately detected he or she is standing on.

 

Repurposing Gertrude Stein's famous observation on Oakland, CA:  There's no there there.

 

 

Great catch Brian. The OP is definitely NOT  freaking out.


It is essential to have a good Malware program as well as Windows Defender, because NO anti Virus software is perfect, below are links to two of the best!

 

MalwareByte:    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/malwarebytes-anti-malware/

 

SuperAntiSpyware:   http://www.superantispyware.com

 

 

Just download the FREE versions, update the definitions regularly, and run one or both every couple of weeks.

 

 

Yes, I agree. I have Malwarebytes installed. You never know...


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#11 Willabong

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Posted 30 December 2015 - 10:39 AM

britechguy,  I didn't even know SpywareBlaster was still in existence, I last used that program over ten years ago when I built my first XP machine? 

Just did some checking, and it seems that SpywareBlaster (the FREE version) doesn't work with Edge/Opera or Chrome browsers. This hasn't changed in over ten years, so if you don't run either Internet Explorer or Firefox you can forget it!

 

If I am wrong, then please let me know?


Edited by Willabong, 30 December 2015 - 03:10 PM.


#12 LMurphy001

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 12:19 AM

I meant to say I am now freaking out in the op

I reset, but it didn't go all the way back to out-of-the-box condition.

I have not been successful creating a recovery USB. It says it can't use the usb drive I give it. Even after I reformatted the USB to ntfs. I'm not the only one. I googled it. I gave up. I have no external recovery media. I am going to get the blue shirts at Best Buy to help. No System Image. No recovery drive.

I bought and installed eset nod32.

I also installed the free versions of mbam and mbae.

I've got to learn how to use Windows backup. And file versions or history, what ever. Keeping non secure files on one drive for now

#13 Adam Pollard

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 04:54 AM

If you ever need to reinstall, you can use the Windows 10 media creation tool. For your personal files, OneDrive is not a bad choice, in my opinion. I can't speak for Windows backup in Windows 10, but if it's the same program as in previous versions, it can't be relied on. In real world situations, such as hard drive failure (bare metal restore) it's never worked. I personally use R-Drive image, which is not free (but cheap) fast and reliable. One good reason to do image or offline backups is in case of malware like cryptolocker, which will scramble all personal files, which then get synced to OneDrive or other real time sync software, so the online copies also become scrambled.


Edited by Adam Pollard, 31 December 2015 - 04:55 AM.


#14 LMurphy001

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 03:50 PM

I read this page: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10

 

it seems to be assuming I am not at Windows 10 yet. I have Windows 10 installed (64bit) out of the box. I should be able to create an image without having to download it from the internet. It should have all the right drivers for the Surface Pro 4, with the touch screen, the pen, and so forth. I don't want a generic Windows 10 64 bit ISO image. I want a recovery image that is specifically matched to this hardware.

 

Windows 10 is a little new to me; maybe I'm not doing it right.

 

I'm trying this next:

http://www.windowscentral.com/how-make-full-backup-windows-pc



#15 LMurphy001

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Posted 02 January 2016 - 04:30 PM

I'm not allowed to post an image of the error I got when I tried the steps in the article at the link above.

 

It says:

Create a system image

Where do you want to save the backup?

A system image is a copy of the drives required for Windows to run it can also include

additional drives. A system image can be used to restore your computer if your hard drive

or computer ever stops working; however you can't choose individual items to restore.

 

(X) On a hard disk

(I selected my 32gb USB 3.0 PNY flash drive)

 

(Yellow caution triangle) The drive is not a valid backup location.

 

( ) On one or more DVDs (there's no DVD drive on this system)

 

( ) On a network location (I want my backup literally in my hand if something goes wrong)

 

If they've stopped including DVD/CS drives in the hardware, and if there's only 1 USB port, then they SHOULD allow me to use a USB 3.0 as a backup device. It has 32GB on it. It can't be too small. What are they thinking?? This seems ludicrous to me. It's like they jumped ahead to 'what can we get rid of and stop supporting' but without sufficiently asking, 'But what do we need to include instead to provide that functionality?'

 

I used to be able to use CloneZilla on one of my other systems. Do I have to figure out how to do that for this system? Why doesn't MS have something convenient built in?

 

I just want something to plug in and click on "Restore whole system image" in case the drive becomes corrupted and needs complete rewrite, or in case of ransom wear, or if I lose this tablet and need to replace it with all the whole system, configured as it is right now, with the software I've installed configured the way it is right now, with all my programs, set up the way they are right now.

 

It would be nice to push just one or two buttons and have my current working state restored in a matter of 20 minutes or so. I must be missing something. Seems after all these years, Microsoft should have something working! It really makes me wish I could work from a Mac or Chromebook. Makes me think I should return Windows computer and buy a Linux one. At least then, when there's all sorts of missing stuff and I can't figure things out, I know it isn't me, it's the fact that it's an unknown operating system.

 

I think that if I plug in a non-SSD external hard drive into the USB port, such as a Seagate or Western Digital, it might consider that to be a valid drive. I don't know if I have any of those around with sufficient free space. If I do, none of them are USB 3.0, I'm fairly sure. And not only that, I'd still have to create a bootable flash drive with the software to tell it to fetch the correct sytem back image from the Seagate / WD external hard drive.

 

It seems silly to me that USB flash drives are not considered hard disks for this purpose.

 

I'm so tired, I can barely see straight.






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