Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

windows 10 alternative


  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1 reton1

reton1

  • Members
  • 18 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:00 PM

Posted 25 December 2015 - 03:33 AM

i am looking for a windows 10 alternative i have heard of linux it looks good but i heard there are things that linux cant do that windows can like game does this apply to all versions of linux



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Sintharius

Sintharius

    Bleepin' Sniper


  • Members
  • 5,639 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Local time:10:00 PM

Posted 25 December 2015 - 04:14 AM

A lot of Steam games do not yet have Linux versions for example. If you happen to play a majority of those, you will be stuck with Windows.

Otherwise Linux is a pretty good alternative to Windows in general, if you are willing to go the learning curve.

#3 jargos

jargos

  • Members
  • 664 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney Australia
  • Local time:07:00 AM

Posted 25 December 2015 - 04:18 AM

Hi reton1 and welcome.

 

I was a Windows user all my life. With the advent of W10 I switched to Linux Mint 17.2 and absolutely love it.

 

There is not one thing there that I cannot do - in fact, I do it all so much better with Linux.

 

However, I cannot speak about gaming - I haven't got a clue there, as I never game on computers.

 

I have catalogued my experiences in the following thread. The first few pages will give you the idea.

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/591975/my-linux-experience/


Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon on older, Pentium 4 desktop.

Win 7 on Medion Akoya i3 laptop


#4 reton1

reton1
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 18 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:00 PM

Posted 25 December 2015 - 05:41 AM

it looks good but i am looking for a operating system that can do gaming



#5 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 14,414 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:07:00 AM

Posted 25 December 2015 - 07:12 AM

You need to use whatever operating system the games you want to play are written for.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#6 Skov

Skov

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:04:00 PM

Posted 25 December 2015 - 09:43 AM

Windows is still the go to for gaming, however you can dual boot linux if you want to try something else



#7 jargos

jargos

  • Members
  • 664 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney Australia
  • Local time:07:00 AM

Posted 26 December 2015 - 12:33 AM

it looks good but i am looking for a operating system that can do gaming

OK, well, as I said, I know nothing about gaming - on any OS.

You could try asking the folk in the Linux forum about it.


Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon on older, Pentium 4 desktop.

Win 7 on Medion Akoya i3 laptop


#8 Aura

Aura

    Bleepin' Special Ops


  • Malware Response Team
  • 19,629 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:00 PM

Posted 26 December 2015 - 12:51 AM

Is there a reason as to why you are looking for a Windows 10 alternative? Also you don't have "a lot of choice". It's either Windows, OS X (you need to buy a copy of it and if you want to install it on a computer that isn't a Mac, you need to make sure your hardware is compatible), and if you don't like Linux, BSD, etc. distros because you cannot do a lot of gaming on them, then you're pretty much short on luck sadly.

unite_blue.png
Security Administrator | Sysnative Windows Update Senior Analyst | Malware Hunter | @SecurityAura
My timezone UTC-05:00 (East. Coast). If I didn't reply to you within 48 hours, please send me a PM.


#9 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 2,998 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:00 PM

Posted 26 December 2015 - 01:00 PM

There are plenty of operating systems you could choose instead of windows 10, which ones are relevant depends on your current situation but they can be listed as follows:

Windows 7, a popular windows OS, very capable and still supported for some years to come, if you have this curently you can keep using it (you might want to do a few things to stop the GWX prompts appearing though), if you are looking for a new system then some come with it preinstalled but these are pretty rare now, you would have to go for a system with a more recent OS or no OS at all then buy a windows 7 installation disc separately then use this to install windows 7.

Windows 8.1, uglier than windows 7 but just as capabel and containg most of the same features. Windows 8.1 "suffers" from the lack of a start button but it is easy to just pin progras you often use to the taskbar or as desktop icons and learn to use the "windows key" +"r" run command to open programs you use less often. Windows 8.1 also has an ugly metor interface, but except for a few hours when initially setting the system up you never need to use this interface again, you can stay entirely in the desktop interface. Windows 8.1 has even longer left for support than windows 7, if you have it at present you can keep using it (though you might want to get rid of the GWX prompts by removing kB3035583 and some other particular updates) or if you are after a new system you can find many still on sale with this preinstalled.

Windows 8.0, still on sale but coming to the end of it's support in January, this can be upgraded free to 8.1 but the upgrade can be a little buggy. Better not to buy a new system with 8.0 installed and hope it upgrades well(If you're after a new system buy one with 8.1 or 7), but if you have 8.0 already you can upgrade it to 8.1, but I suggest starting a thread asking for advic first, because there are a few things you must be aware of.

Linux (many flavours and types to choose from), this should run ok from USB on your current hardware so you can test it out. Doing so is free but you'l need to check some compatibility things first. It's hard to find system with linux preinstalled, although they do exist, so if you're after new hardware you'll need to do some research as to what types of machine can run linux, you'll also need to avoid buying systems with a "secure boot" system which cannot be turned off*. If you go looking for a system to run a linux OS make a linux live USB first take it to the shop and ask the people there if you can test it on the machines htey have out, only buy a system when you have found it passes that test and boots the linux USB ok. Also make sure to explain clearly your requirements to the shop staff and ask them if any of their staff are familiar with linux, ask to speak to those staff members.


*this must also be avoided when buying any system where you would rather run a different OS than the preinstalled one. When buying systems make sure to, in the shop, restart them and boot into "advanced startup", look at the UEFI/BIOS options, check that secure boot can be turned off.

Edited by rp88, 26 December 2015 - 01:01 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#10 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,362 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:04:00 PM

Posted 26 December 2015 - 02:21 PM

If you want gaming and compatibility you're stuck with Windows, at least until gaming companies start making their games for *nix OSes.  It is like buying a Mac, you can't use Windows software.  If you switch operating systems you will need to repurchase all of your software, or find a replacement, for all of your existing software.



#11 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,010 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:05:00 PM

Posted 26 December 2015 - 03:36 PM

reton1,  :welcome: to Bleeping Computer Forums! :)

 

If you don't mind installing an OS from scratch, Newegg has Windows 8.1, often on promo, which is supported until early 2023 (a little over 7 years). Since Update 1 has been included, has better power management over Windows 7 & with some adjustments, some of the privacy leaks can be stopped w/out 3rd party software. Just the removal of some telemetry & Customer Experience (CEIP) updates, and some other unneeded updates. We can explain further should you choose this path, how to block 10 from reinstalling behind your back, like it did on a PC I forgot to shut down one night a couple of months back. Woke up & seen the mouse LED glowing, was going to cut it off, and Windows 10 was 90% installed. This can be prevented with a simple registry edit, yet some other things needs to be taken care of as well, which most anyone who can run a computer can do. :)

 

This may be a better long term solution than Windows 7, and likely uses less resources than Windows 10 does. Plus you can run your Windows software and not have to deal with lots of workarounds. As a 95% Linux MInt to 5% Windows user, am in a position to say that much of your software just won't work on Linux. Even if in a virtual machine, your performance will go down the drain. 

 

Hopefully this is of some help, after all, it takes resources for Windows 10 to be continually be using one's hardware to upload data to Microsoft, and one member on this very forum showed where the graphics card was doing just that. Plus my experience with Windows 10, on 5 different computers, all of which has been rolled back to 7, wasn't good, even cleanly installed & using a local account. Security scans were taking almost 2x longer, and my favorite for catching tracking cookies, SuperAntiSpyware, was taking 5x longer for a default short scan, a little over a minute, whereas on 7 & 8.1, only 17-22 seconds on a fast SSD. If it were one computer, I'd not be concerned, but 5 of various brands & ages? There's cause for concern for an app to be slowed by that much time. 

 

If Windows 10 were that great, everything one does would be faster, rather than the other way around. Windows 7, and a few updates later, 8.1 done the same in running faster than prior versions. Furthermore, I don't believe they'd be giving it away. There's always a string tied to free products with much anything associated with Windows & I'm not a Microsoft puppet. Just keep some of the OS's to assist others in need, not being a gamer, nor shackled to MS Office, get by quite well with Linux Mint 17, which offers all I need, including a complete Office suite in the install media. Updates are shipped like with Windows 10, as released, rather than once monthly like 8.1 & below does. The only difference is that the user can choose what updates to install with Mint, with 10, what one sees downloading is what one gets. Even if that update doesn't apply to one's system, for instance, a recent Lenovo USB update was optional for Windows 7 & 8.1 users, likely mandatory for those running 10. 

 

Just my two cents about that. 

 

Whatever you decide, we'll support your decision & do what we can to assist. :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 29 December 2015 - 01:10 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 2,998 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:00 PM

Posted 28 December 2015 - 02:23 PM

" If you switch operating systems you will need to repurchase all of your software, or find a replacement, for all of your existing software."

Not necessarily ALL, with linux there is a chance some of your windows programs might work under a utility called wine, but it is only a chance not a certainty. Atleast with linux you can test it for free, and without making any changes to your windows system(using a lve USB), and see if wine does allow you to use the particular windows programs you need under linux.

Edited by rp88, 28 December 2015 - 02:57 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#13 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 7,775 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:05:00 PM

Posted 28 December 2015 - 02:37 PM

" If you switch operating systems you will need to repurchase all of your software, or find a replacement, for all of your existing software." Not necessarily ALL, with linux there is a chance some of your windows programs might work under a utility called wine, but it is only a chance not a certainty. Atleast with linux you can test it for free, and without making any changes to your windows system(using a lve USB), and see if wine does allow you to use the particular windows programs you need under linux.

 

You are absolutely correct.  I will say, however, that you should presume that your existing Windows software will not work under wine and that you'll need to replace it as the default situation.  You have to take the time to test program by program, and not just that it will start OK, but you can do a decent number of "the usual things" you do without any "burping."

 

Also, having been through more operating systems than I care to think about over the years, there is no such thing as a truly seamless and painless transition.  Anyone can learn how to do what they used to do one way either a slightly different or significantly different way.  The real pain comes from the fact that, with operating systems you've been using for years, a lot of what you do is much like breathing and you just don't even think about it consciously anymore.  That all vanishes awfully quickly when you jump to a new OS, and you need to be mentally prepared for that.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#14 rp88

rp88

  • Members
  • 2,998 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:09:00 PM

Posted 28 December 2015 - 02:56 PM

Post#11:
Blocking of windows 10 can be done by other means than that registry edit, and it might be better to use a combination of both because I've heard that the registry edit alone isn't always enough. Basically what a user needs to do is remove certain KB updates, set updates to "check automatically but ask me whether I want to download" and then follow a routine of only installing certain updates when they are released (check every tuesday to see if new updates are being offered) and never installing other particular updates. A user who has previously had GWX in their system tray mght need to take further steps also, such as searching their C:\ drive for "gwx.exe" files and deleting those (this requires some permissions changes and should only be done AFTER a user has followed all other GWX prevention/removal steps and has made a system image), and removing a folder of many gigabytes size which might have appeared in C:\ a folder called "$WINDOWS.~BT". It's also wise to check scheduled tasks and see if any GWX related ones are present.More details can be found at the links below:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/551980/the-windows-updates-monitoring-thread/ a list of updates dating back to october 2014 advising which updates to have and which you may wish to avoid.

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/599235/for-those-that-wish-to-stay-with-7/ advice about avoiding windows 10, aimed at windows 7 but applies to 8.1 as well n most of the points. Contains some useful blacklists of updates to be avoided by users wanting to stay with 7 or 8.1.

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/578100/remove-the-get-windows-10-icon-from-the-icon-tray/ older advice about preventing GWx dating back from when GWX first appeared before windows 10 was released. Much of the advice here can be found elsewhere though and some of it is no longer relevant.

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/598644/microsoft-sets-stage-for-massive-windows-10-upgrade-strategy/page-3#entry3883096 first two paragraphs of this post

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/596277/windows-updates-update-to-windows-10/

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/592634/windows-7-pc-involuntarily-installed-10-via-updates/

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/589964/microsoft-is-downloading-windows-10-to-your-machine-just-in-case/page-9#entry3834755

Edited by rp88, 28 December 2015 - 02:56 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB

#15 jargos

jargos

  • Members
  • 664 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney Australia
  • Local time:07:00 AM

Posted 29 December 2015 - 12:02 AM

 

" If you switch operating systems you will need to repurchase all of your software, or find a replacement, for all of your existing software." Not necessarily ALL, with linux there is a chance some of your windows programs might work under a utility called wine, but it is only a chance not a certainty. Atleast with linux you can test it for free, and without making any changes to your windows system(using a lve USB), and see if wine does allow you to use the particular windows programs you need under linux.

 

You are absolutely correct.  I will say, however, that you should presume that your existing Windows software will not work under wine and that you'll need to replace it as the default situation.  You have to take the time to test program by program, and not just that it will start OK, but you can do a decent number of "the usual things" you do without any "burping."

 

Also, having been through more operating systems than I care to think about over the years, there is no such thing as a truly seamless and painless transition.  Anyone can learn how to do what they used to do one way either a slightly different or significantly different way.  The real pain comes from the fact that, with operating systems you've been using for years, a lot of what you do is much like breathing and you just don't even think about it consciously anymore.  That all vanishes awfully quickly when you jump to a new OS, and you need to be mentally prepared for that.

 

 

Bolded (last para)

 

NOT true at all.

 

At least in my case - a 30+ years Windows user (and no other).

 

Once I had Linux Mint 17.2 fully loaded (and even the full loading was easy peasy) I found I could get my mind and fingers around it in a matter of minutes.

 

Certainly, within a couple of hours, I was well on the way to doing more than 50% of my stuff on Linux.

 

Within a day or two, I could do 99% of my stuff on Linux, and now, 100%.

 

And your reference to experiencing real pain - I experienced NO real pain at all - or imagined for that matter).

 

Rather, I experienced abundant joy, pleasure, jubilation, at how good it all was, and the fact that I, a computer dummy with rudimentary computer knowledge, was so able to do it all.

 

But most of all, I was thrilled at the fact that I could now abandon MSFT and all it's trappings.

 

Edit - I meant 'now' in the last line, not 'not'.


Edited by jargos, 29 December 2015 - 12:10 AM.

Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon on older, Pentium 4 desktop.

Win 7 on Medion Akoya i3 laptop





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users