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What's the best graphics card my processor can handle?


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#1 coreynj

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Posted 23 December 2015 - 09:56 PM

I'm currently running an AMD Radeon 5700 HD Series graphics card, with an Intel Core i7 2.8GHz processor, 64bit system. I'd prefer to stick with AMD graphics cards only. I'd also prefer something higher than the AMD Radeon HD 7870, if it can handle that. If you need any additional information, let me know. Thanks!


Edited by coreynj, 23 December 2015 - 09:56 PM.


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#2 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 23 December 2015 - 10:07 PM

What is your budget? Your psu wattage?

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#3 coreynj

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Posted 23 December 2015 - 10:09 PM

What is your budget? Your psu wattage?

My budget is currently anything, I'm just looking at the options. How would I go about finding my psu wattage?



#4 coreynj

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Posted 23 December 2015 - 10:27 PM

What is your budget? Your psu wattage?

I looked at the inside of my computer, and it says "MAX OUTPUT POWER: 350W", is that what you're looking for?



#5 richcbro

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 12:11 AM

350W power supply can't provide enough power to powerful graphics card, especially card better than HD 7870 that you want. You will need to upgrade your PSU to at least 600W.


Edited by batman1234, 24 December 2015 - 12:11 AM.

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#6 dc3

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 12:56 PM

The 7870 requires a minimum 500W @ 23A PSU.

 

If you are going to run Crossfire you will need a 700W  PSU.


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#7 Drillingmachine

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 03:11 PM

350W is too little but 7870 runs fine with good quality 450W PSU. However 7870 is very old card and been replaced with newer ones. For 350W PSU you are not getting good card so consider at least 500W PSU to get much better graphics.



#8 dc3

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 04:00 PM

1.  350W is too little but 7870 runs fine with good quality 450W PSU.

 

2,  However 7870 is very old card and been replaced with newer ones. 

1.  The 7870 need a minimum PSU of 500W, but more importantly the 12V rail must have a current rating of 23A.

 

2.  To quote coreynj "I'd also prefer something higher than the AMD Radeon HD 7870".  Obviously they are not interested specifically in the 7870.


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#9 Drillingmachine

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 11:28 PM

 

1.  350W is too little but 7870 runs fine with good quality 450W PSU.

 

2,  However 7870 is very old card and been replaced with newer ones. 

1.  The 7870 need a minimum PSU of 500W, but more importantly the 12V rail must have a current rating of 23A.

 

2.  To quote coreynj "I'd also prefer something higher than the AMD Radeon HD 7870".  Obviously they are not interested specifically in the 7870.

 

 

Actually no. My friend bought computer with 7870, asked me if it runs with 450W PSU. I said yes. I cannot figure out why 450W is not enough when system power consumption maximum is around 300W.

 

23A +12V is quite realistic for card only, but 500W and 23A +12V for whole system makes absolutely no sense. 12V*23A=276W. So this "500W total and 23A +12V" requirement means following: 276W from +12V rail and 224W from OTHER rails :blink:



#10 the_patriot11

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Posted 25 December 2015 - 03:13 AM

You can in theory run a card of that nature on a 450 watt PSU providing its a high end PSU and your running little to no other accessories on your system, and even then your cutting it close. If its your computer and you know what your doing then you can probably get by with it, at least for awhile, though your still putting undue stress on it.

Now, recommending to someone else you've only met over the internet that they use a 450 watt PSU without any knowledge of their entire computer setup, is irresponsible at best. If the op purchases such a low wattage PSU on your recommendation and it fries, are you going to buy him a new one? I didn't think so. The manufacturer recommends 500 watt then the op wants to have at least 500 watts. In fact it maybe helpful for him to visit neweggs power supply calculator, but I would say for any good modern gaming computer, 550-600 watts is a good happy medium that will run most single video cards and 8-900 to be on the safe side for crossfire.

Now, as far as video card recommendations, I just ordered the sapphire nitro r9 380 4gb model. I'm running it combined with a AMD phenom II 945 quad core with 16 gigs of ram, so like you I'm running an older system, but the card is performing great on the system and will serve you great as well. It is only midrange but its powerful and directX12 capable which the 7xxx cards are not. This card is running about $220 on newegg right now with a $15 mail in rebate. But, as has been previously stated, you need to upgrade your PSU to a MINIMUM of 500 watts, if not 600, to be safe. Using a power supply calculator will help determine what you actually need. And make sure its a good PSU, not a cheap one, and modular if you can afford them will change your life.

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#11 Drillingmachine

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Posted 25 December 2015 - 04:51 AM

You can in theory run a card of that nature on a 450 watt PSU providing its a high end PSU and your running little to no other accessories on your system, and even then your cutting it close. If its your computer and you know what your doing then you can probably get by with it, at least for awhile, though your still putting undue stress on it.

Now, recommending to someone else you've only met over the internet that they use a 450 watt PSU without any knowledge of their entire computer setup, is irresponsible at best. If the op purchases such a low wattage PSU on your recommendation and it fries, are you going to buy him a new one? I didn't think so. The manufacturer recommends 500 watt then the op wants to have at least 500 watts. In fact it maybe helpful for him to visit neweggs power supply calculator, but I would say for any good modern gaming computer, 550-600 watts is a good happy medium that will run most single video cards and 8-900 to be on the safe side for crossfire.

Now, as far as video card recommendations, I just ordered the sapphire nitro r9 380 4gb model. I'm running it combined with a AMD phenom II 945 quad core with 16 gigs of ram, so like you I'm running an older system, but the card is performing great on the system and will serve you great as well. It is only midrange but its powerful and directX12 capable which the 7xxx cards are not. This card is running about $220 on newegg right now with a $15 mail in rebate. But, as has been previously stated, you need to upgrade your PSU to a MINIMUM of 500 watts, if not 600, to be safe. Using a power supply calculator will help determine what you actually need. And make sure its a good PSU, not a cheap one, and modular if you can afford them will change your life.

 

Not in theory only but in practice also. When systen power consumption maximun is about 300W, there is no problems using 450W PSU. In fact, 450W PSU works better.

 

It's not irresponsible. It's entirely possible that  entire setup contain parts that need 700W PSU. Witout knowing what parts are on computer, these "you need at least XXX watt PSU" recommendations are totally useless. That's why all recommendations about PSU made by video card manufacturer are also totally useless. Without knowing whole system, there is no way to recommend PSU. I also proved that this time manufacturers recommendations are totally wrong as 23A +12V and 500W total makes no sense on modern computer. I agree that about 500W PSU is good baseline for modern computer with good graphics card.

 

Overkill PSU wastes money (more expensive PSU) and cause PSU work lower effiency. Two reason why buying too big PSU is not recommended. I always recommend realistic PSU, not overkill, unless there is chance that computer will be upgraded with much more power hungry parts. Some may say I recommend too low wattage PSU's but so far nobody has complained about this. And I have recommended many machines IRL.

 

Radeon R9 380 4GB is good choice with that CPU.


Edited by Drillingmachine, 25 December 2015 - 04:53 AM.


#12 the_patriot11

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Posted 25 December 2015 - 09:54 AM

It is, especially when your not recommending a PSU. Manufacturers make the recommendation based on the average amount of peripherals most people use. That's why someone can get away with 450 watts if they know what's in their system and they know their PSU. You don't know what all the op has.

Another reason not to give this advice is the way PSU companies label their products. Not all 450 watt PSUs are 450 watt PSUs. Some campanies label their PSUs by their continuous power-meaninf they actually put out a continuous 450 watts. While others, label by their peak power. So a PSU labeled that way will peak at 450 watts, but only be able to handle it for a short time, the actual continuous supply can be anywhere from 350-400 watts. Which is likely to fry, as a continuous 450 is pushing it.

As far as to much, that makes no difference. There is no power wasted, the PSU simply won't use the excess. Sure the efficiency will go down, but simply because it's not drawing the excess energy. It is MUCH safer to do it this way.

and you have the added bonus of future upgrade ability, as in next time you want an upgrade you don't have to go out and buy another PSU. It would be highly unwise to purchase a low end PSU that is borderline power wise, even if you know for 100% certainty that it will work, for this reason alone. No future upgrade ability, high chance of failure, and even if it does work, garentees shorter life span of the PSU from running at max capacity all the time. There is no good reason to go with such a low wattage PSU especially with the cards we are talking about, and without a complete knowledge of the ops computer.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#13 Drillingmachine

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Posted 25 December 2015 - 10:24 AM

It is, especially when your not recommending a PSU. Manufacturers make the recommendation based on the average amount of peripherals most people use. That's why someone can get away with 450 watts if they know what's in their system and they know their PSU. You don't know what all the op has.

Another reason not to give this advice is the way PSU companies label their products. Not all 450 watt PSUs are 450 watt PSUs. Some campanies label their PSUs by their continuous power-meaninf they actually put out a continuous 450 watts. While others, label by their peak power. So a PSU labeled that way will peak at 450 watts, but only be able to handle it for a short time, the actual continuous supply can be anywhere from 350-400 watts. Which is likely to fry, as a continuous 450 is pushing it.

As far as to much, that makes no difference. There is no power wasted, the PSU simply won't use the excess. Sure the efficiency will go down, but simply because it's not drawing the excess energy. It is MUCH safer to do it this way.

and you have the added bonus of future upgrade ability, as in next time you want an upgrade you don't have to go out and buy another PSU. It would be highly unwise to purchase a low end PSU that is borderline power wise, even if you know for 100% certainty that it will work, for this reason alone. No future upgrade ability, high chance of failure, and even if it does work, garentees shorter life span of the PSU from running at max capacity all the time. There is no good reason to go with such a low wattage PSU especially with the cards we are talking about, and without a complete knowledge of the ops computer.

 

Main reason why video card manufacturers recommend too high wattage PSU is that second reason. Low quality PSU's deliver lot less than they promise. Average amount of peripherals don't make 100 watt difference. This means that when using high quality PSU's, video card manufacturers' recommendations are totally useless. Their recommendations are based on low quality PSU's and cannot know what are other parts.

 

Effiency will go down and it will draw more power because of that. Difference may not be huge but there's not huge difference between 80+ bronze and 80+ gold either.

 

How that PSU overlimiting makes anything safer or PSU life longer? Lower effiency = more heat = shorter lifespan (if components have equal quality). Examples I gave were far from max capacity. Also, almost every high quality PSU has max capacity at least 10% over advertised wattage, so 450W PSU can be thought as about 500W unit. Then about 300W maximum load is very far from PSU maximum.

 

We still don't know thread starter's other parts. Until exact computer specs are known, there is also no need to say "you will need at least XXXW PSU" because other parts are what determines power requirement. Something video card manufacturers don't know either so their recommendations can safely be ignored.



#14 the_patriot11

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Posted 25 December 2015 - 10:27 AM

Thanks not only did you repeat what I just said you just gave the reason why its unwise to use such a low PSU and why you shouldn't be recommending such.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#15 Drillingmachine

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Posted 25 December 2015 - 10:34 AM

Thanks not only did you repeat what I just said you just gave the reason why its unwise to use such a low PSU and why you shouldn't be recommending such.

 

Original recommendation was:

 

The 7870 requires a minimum 500W @ 23A PSU.

 

If you are going to run Crossfire you will need a 700W  PSU.

 

276W from +12V line is very serious problem with that GPU, considering GPU alone can take 225W from specs. Low quality PSU probably can match that 23A +12V and 500 watts (or even 700W) but it probably will fry if +12V line is too weak. Good quality 450W PSU has no problems.

 

Anyway we still need that computer exact specs, until then, there cannot be good recommendations.


Edited by Drillingmachine, 25 December 2015 - 10:34 AM.





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