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New Notebook: remove default installations and reinstall?


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#1 Dirkk

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 04:35 AM

Should one after buying a new Notebook / PC completely remove / format its drive with all of the default installations and install the (same) OS and all programs again? Or keep the default installations?


Windows 10 Home, 64bit


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#2 ChuckPasadena

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 08:28 AM

By default installations do you mean all the bloatware PS makers pre install on every new system they sell?  Because if you do I'm not 100% sure I've seen any step by step guides to achieve that very purpose specific PC's running Windows 10 but I know where you're most likely to find one


Edited by ChuckPasadena, 19 December 2015 - 08:31 AM.


#3 RolandJS

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 08:34 AM

I think PC-Decrapifier is available from BC's download section.  It will quick-list the stuff it finds, and allow you to click what you want un-installed/removed.  **Careful!  Not everything installed by a manufacturer is "crapware,"  some to much of it was installed to make Windows and hard-ware life much smoother as pertaining [but not limited] to: graphic card or onboard, wifi adapter [usually onboard], sound-card or onboard, ethernet card or onboard, getting technical help, factory reset/rebuild and factory reInstalls shortcuts [which are the only bridges to the hidden partition], and so on. **


Edited by RolandJS, 19 December 2015 - 08:38 PM.

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http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

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#4 Dirkk

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 01:35 PM

Many thanks.

 

Sorry for my bad expression.

 

By default installations do you mean all the bloatware PS makers pre install on every new system they sell?

I am not sure, all of the software being on the HDD, I would say. When a Notebook / computer is supplied, when you buy one in a shop usually (I guess) the OS already is installed and there are also programs installed (you do not need or you might need, e.g. Word, Office, etc.) so the customer would not need to install them by himself.

 

Because if you do I'm not 100% sure I've seen any step by step guides to achieve that very purpose specific PC's running Windows 10 but I know where you're most likely to find one

I think PC-Decrapifier is available from BC's download section.  It will quick-list the stuff it finds, and allow you to click what you want un-installed/removed.

Hmmm, I do not quite understand. Just formating the HDD would not help?

 

**Careful!  Not everything installed by a manufacturer is "crapware,"  some to much of it was installed to make Windows and hard-ware life much smoother as pertaining [but not limited] to: graphic card or onboard, wifi adapter, sound-card or onboard, ethernet card or onboard, getting technical help, factory reset/rebuild and factory reInstalls shortcuts [which are the only bridges to the hidden partition], and so on. **

I would think, I then will just reinstall that kind of software making hard-ware life smoother. Never heard of such a software.


Windows 10 Home, 64bit


#5 britechguy

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 04:22 PM

Should one after buying a new Notebook / PC completely remove / format its drive with all of the default installations and install the (same) OS and all programs again? Or keep the default installations?

 

The simple and straightforward answer is, "No."  It makes absolutely no sense to do this since one can simply choose to uninstall the programs that may have been bundled with the computer that one does not use.  That's a way less complicated, and far safer, option than what you're proposing.

 

Taking the crapware, or even decent programs one simply doesn't want, off of a brand new machine is pretty much like peeling off all of the protective film that covers the physical components.  Doing what you propose would be more analogous to ripping every piece of hardware out of the case it's in, buying an new case, and putting back in only those pieces one thinks one will use.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#6 Dirkk

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 05:43 PM

Many thanks.

 

It makes absolutely no sense to do this since one can simply choose to uninstall the programs

It very often is said there are leavings when uninstaling a program or anything else what might cause unwanted effects or so.

 

That's a way less complicated, and far safer,

Why is it far safer? And what might be unsafe or risky to format / reinstall the OS / programs?

 

Taking the crapware, or even decent programs one simply doesn't want, off of a brand new machine is pretty much like peeling off all of the protective film that covers the physical components.

So one should leave the crapware and unwanted programs like the are, just not use them, not uninstall them? And why might they protect anything / the system and obviously be helpful?

 

 


Windows 10 Home, 64bit


#7 britechguy

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 06:02 PM

Many thanks.
 

It makes absolutely no sense to do this since one can simply choose to uninstall the programs

It very often is said there are leavings when uninstaling a program or anything else what might cause unwanted effects or so.


I have not encountered this with any regularity (meaning, I can't even recall the last time) in several decades of being in this business. Most software is pretty good about cleaning up after itself, some less so, but typically the "worst" effect I've seen is wasted disk space. If you find that a program you've uninstalled still has its folder in the program files directory (and be certain that it is the program you're thinking it is) you can feel free to delete that folder. I don't bother with this on a routine basis because what's typically left is skeletal rather than substantive.
 
 
 

That's a way less complicated, and far safer,

Why is it far safer? And what might be unsafe or risky to format / reinstall the OS / programs?


I guess if you're very comfortable with installing an OS from complete scratch it may not be "far safer." Based upon the fact that you're asking the questions you're asking I am thinking this does not apply to you.

It comes down to a simple principle that applies in arenas outside computing as well: Don't mess with a functioning system!!
You don't get a system more functional than most are "fresh out of the box." Hence the reason I suggest that people do a backup, including a system image, as one of the first things they do when they get a new computer. It gives you a pristine baseline (or as close as you're likely to get unless you are capable of installing a "naked" OS without any bundled software/crapware).
 
 

Taking the crapware, or even decent programs one simply doesn't want, off of a brand new machine is pretty much like peeling off all of the protective film that covers the physical components.

So one should leave the crapware and unwanted programs like the are, just not use them, not uninstall them? And why might they protect anything / the system and obviously be helpful?


That's not what I said. Most of us peel off those sheets of protective plastic film as one of the first things we do once the computer comes out of its packaging. What I'm saying is that doing a round of "crapware/bloatware/software I don't want" removal from a brand new computer is the electronic equivalent of peeling off and pitching that protective film. It's just a routine part of setting up a brand new computer. I wasn't implying that the crapware/bloatware/software you don't want protects the computer in any way.

Edited by Queen-Evie, 19 December 2015 - 06:07 PM.
language edit

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#8 Dirkk

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 07:03 PM

I have not encountered this with any regularity (meaning, I can't even recall the last time) in several decades of being in this business. Most software is pretty good about cleaning up after itself, some less so, but typically the "worst" effect I've seen is wasted disk space.

 

That sounds completely different than that of what I have read again and again in computer magazines (bloat registry, slow down system, etc.), on the Internet or else, I didn't know that. I do not have any idea of computers.

 

 

I have not encountered this with any regularity (meaning, I can't even recall the last time) in several decades of being in this business. Most software is pretty good about cleaning up after itself, some less so, but typically the "worst" effect I've seen is wasted disk space.

 

Yes, leavings like that wouldn't bother me either.

 

 

I guess if you're very comfortable with installing an OS from complete scratch

 

Well, I would say neither comfortable nor uncomfortable, it doesn't appear to be that difficulty, just follow the instructions the messages in the windows give. I assume the installation of Win 10 will be easier to handle (or not more difficult) than the one of Win 7.

 

 

That's not what I said. Most of us peel off those sheets of protective plastic film as one of the first things we do once the computer comes out of its packaging. What I'm saying is that doing a round of "crapware/bloatware/software I don't want" removal from a brand new computer is the electronic equivalent of peeling off and pitching that protective film. It's just a routine part of setting up a brand new computer. I wasn't implying that the crapware/bloatware/software you don't want protects the computer in any way.

 

So - I hope I understand it right, now - that means one simply should remove all of that kind of none protecting crapware/bloatware/software one do not want like one removes that protecting film.


Edited by Dirkk, 19 December 2015 - 07:05 PM.

Windows 10 Home, 64bit


#9 RolandJS

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 08:48 PM

  Let me try one more time, quoting myself:  **Careful!  Not everything installed by a manufacturer is "crapware,"  some to much of it was installed to make Windows and hard-ware life much smoother as pertaining [but not limited] to: graphic card or onboard, wifi adapter [usually onboard], sound-card or onboard, ethernet card or onboard, getting technical help, factory reset/rebuild and factory reInstalls shortcuts [which are the only bridges to the hidden partition], and so on. ** 

 

 Now, if one notices the above, I'm bringing out the existence of a marriage of hardware and software, vis-a-vis manufacturer-supplied drivers, which Windows OS uses to commune with and effectively/efficiently with hardware.  Much like the variety one spouse and another spouse brings into a marriage -- becoming One.

 

  If an enduser formats the HD, the enduser must be prepared to hunt down, download, install any driver set that Windows OS does not have for any particular piece of hardware [hardware that requires certain nonWindows-supplied but rather manufacturers-supplied drivers].

 

But hey, if you decide to format HD & go from scratch, remember BC has expert techs that will help you ReLocate the proper drivers formatted away.  :)


Edited by RolandJS, 19 December 2015 - 09:05 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#10 britechguy

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 09:22 PM

Roland,

 

          Just for additional clarity, when I call anything crapware/bloatware/something one does not use or want that never includes things like drivers.  

 

          I'm trying to convince Dirkk that it is far from "the best option" to do what he proposes.  The manufacturers of these systems know a lot more about putting them together, as you note, it's a marriage between many elements of hardware and software, and they customize their OS builds to some extent just like large business enterprises with centralized IT departments do.

 

          I personally think it's nothing short of foolish to take a brand new computer that's been put together with what's got to be a mighty good, if not optimum marriage of components and software, and wipe that to install "the generic version."

 

          Things such as Wildtangent Games, Candy Crush Saga, Skype, the Get Office app, and a number of other things that are clearly end-user software are, as far as I'm concerned, removable at will.  I don't even worry about those for the most part unless I am desperate for disc space or *really* dislike a given program for some reason.  Otherwise a lot of the stuff just sits there, doing nothing and gathering proverbial dust, and I remove it "when the occasion presents itself."


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#11 RolandJS

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 09:39 PM

"... I personally think it's nothing short of foolish to take a brand new computer that's been put together with what's got to be a mighty good, if not optimum marriage of components and software, and wipe that to install "the generic version..."   Britechguy, I was aiming my posts at the situation also, just like you were: asking the OP maker to reconsider his format the HD/reinstall W7 idea.

 

** Addendum:  my error!  should not have posted W7!  Should have remembered OP has W10. **


Edited by RolandJS, 19 December 2015 - 10:03 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#12 britechguy

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Posted 19 December 2015 - 09:55 PM

"... I personally think it's nothing short of foolish to take a brand new computer that's been put together with what's got to be a mighty good, if not optimum marriage of components and software, and wipe that to install "the generic version..."   Britechguy, I was aiming my posts at the situation also, just like you were: asking the OP maker to reconsider his format the HD/reinstall W7 idea.

 

Oh, I knew this.  I just thought it might have been unclear regarding what I consider "fair game" for deletion.

 

I thought he was talking about Windows 10.  Windows 7 only came up as a comparison later.

 

Given what has been happening with computers upgraded from earlier versions of Windows, even when those were "fresh installs" of those earlier versions, and particularly in the area of drivers, I personally would never, ever consider wiping a fresh manufacturer installed version of Windows 10 for any reason.  I'd do everything in my power to fix any errors that might occur with the tools supplied by the manufacturer first, before resorting to Windows tools, at least during the early life of the system.  Of course, I've never had problems with any Windows machine during "the early life of the system" unless there was wonky hardware, and that's been rare.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#13 Dirkk

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Posted 20 December 2015 - 07:21 AM

Thank you very much.

Now, if one notices the above, I'm bringing out the existence of a marriage of hardware and software, vis-a-vis manufacturer-supplied drivers, which Windows OS uses to commune with and effectively/efficiently with hardware.  Much like the variety one spouse and another spouse brings into a marriage -- becoming One.

Yes, of course, I see (if I only were marriaged for better understanding). And my thought before had been, I just could get that state (without the unwanted software) by just reinstalling all of the software / drivers. But that does not appear to be like that.

If an enduser formats the HD, the enduser must be prepared to hunt down, download, install any driver set that Windows OS does not have for any particular piece of hardware [hardware that requires certain nonWindows-supplied but rather manufacturers-supplied drivers].

Actually I had supposed all of those drivers / software would be supplied on a CD or DVD with a new Notebook and thus easily be installed by just double clicking each driver / software and (re-)install it.

Sorry for the confusion about my OS: the OS I have now is Win 7, but the new one will be Win 10 supllied with the new Notebook (at Christmas), I assume.

But hey, if you decide to format HD & go from scratch, remember BC has expert techs that will help you ReLocate the proper drivers formatted away.  :)

Well, yes, I wouldn't have thought it would be that difficulty to do (re-install) that.

Alright, alright, I will keep the manufacturer's, the installed OS, software, drivers. And - of course - not to format / re-install has a further big advantage, a lot of work not to do (and not to ask for help here to find missing / lost drivers, repair a crashed system).

So install from scratch one only should do as a last resort, in case of emergency, I assume.

Very many thanks!
 

Windows 10 Home, 64bit


#14 dannyboy950

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Posted 20 December 2015 - 10:21 AM

I am posting on this not because I am any kind of GURU but because I am living proof of what can happen from messing [removing] too much stuff from a default install.

 

First thing if you are planning on installing Win 10 be shure you have enough computer/resources to run Win 10.  There is a minimum limit. The OS alone takes 4 GB of memory. You will want a little more for better performance.  There is a tool you can run at Microsoft and a guide to help with this.  The more economical [cheap] computers do not come with the install disks and some not even a manual. Mine had neither and only met minimum requirements. Nor was it capable of being upgrade by more than adding 1 stick more of memory. Be shure what you are buying to use will meet your needs now and in the future. My computer did not have a cd/dvd drive at all nor can one be installed. Several of the local computer suppliers have told me that the new laptops will no longer come with optical cd/dvd drives built in.

 

You will also want a fast internet connection speed.  The downloads and updates for 10 are huge, several MB to GB. A slow connection you will get a lot of failed update components. I suggest a good bit of research on the system your thinking of buying before you buy it.  The web can be of help and this Forum as well.

 

Sorry I will have to finish this later.  One last thing as mentioned already create a back up of your system to an external device. A back up does no good if it is on the system that crashes and you can not get to it. I learned the hard way.  I had 3 system images and 3 data back ups on the system when it crashed did me not a bit of good there once it would no longer boot.


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#15 Dirkk

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Posted 20 December 2015 - 03:09 PM

First thing if you are planning on installing Win 10 be shure you have enough computer/resources to run Win 10.

I would assume, a Notebook supplied with Win 10 will have those resources.

 

The OS alone takes 4 GB of memory

That indeed is very much.

 

You will want a little more for better performance.

The new Notebook - I guess, as supplied with Win 10 - will have 8 GB.

 

The more economical [cheap] computers do not come with the install disks and some not even a manual. Mine had neither and only met minimum requirements. Nor was it capable of being upgrade by more than adding 1 stick more of memory. Be shure what you are buying to use will meet your needs now and in the future.

Yes, nowadays you usually have to download the manuals, not only for computers, I assume. Yes, it will be a present, I assume it will meet my needs.

 

My computer did not have a cd/dvd drive at all nor can one be installed. Several of the local computer suppliers have told me that the new laptops will no longer come with optical cd/dvd drives built in.

I would not have assumed that.

 

Yes, alright, the back ups to an external drive.

 

Many thanks, dannyboy950


Windows 10 Home, 64bit





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