Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

OpenSUSE Leap 42.1, or something else . . .


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 8,627 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:07:03 PM

Posted 18 December 2015 - 04:17 PM

Well, I bit the bullet this morning with the old Dell Inspiron 1720 and decided to give OpenSUSE Leap 42.1 a try for my initial foray into Linux.  Now I'm wondering if this is the best choice or not.  It doesn't seem to recognize the existence of my WiFi card and I'm getting some wonkiness with the mouse (external USB) and the mouse pad, too.  It knows about my network card for ethernet, though.

 

I've got copies of Mint and Fedora on DVD, too.

 

Perhaps I haven't done something I need to do, but I'm not certain of that, either.  If there are a preferred "Linux for beginners" tutorials for the specific Linux distros, could I get recommendations?

 

It's been years since I last dealt with any Unix system, but I did some database administration, system administration, and more programming in C than I care to remember.  I'm not an idiot, just rusty, and completely new to the world of Linux from the direct user perspective.

 

 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,420 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:07:03 PM

Posted 18 December 2015 - 04:21 PM

I have had issues with OpenSUSE and wireless drivers as well... this was on fairly new hardware also (or at least new at the time).

 

I would give Mint a go. I used Fedora for a bit, but not as big of a fan of it either. For personal systems I like the debian based stuff. You shouldn't have issues with drivers in either of those distros though.


Edited by DeimosChaos, 18 December 2015 - 04:21 PM.

OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#3 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt

  • Topic Starter

  • Moderator
  • 8,627 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:07:03 PM

Posted 18 December 2015 - 05:15 PM

Thanks.  I liked Mint when I was running it off of the DVD.  I presume installing it right over OpenSUSE is no different than installing OpenSUSE right over Windows 10 was.  If there's something else I need to know beforehand, please pass it along.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#4 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 13,385 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:09:03 AM

Posted 18 December 2015 - 05:26 PM

Yes when you install the operating system it will give you some choices.

Install - removing existing OS

Install - along side

 

If you want to try a full distro set up the way it should be try this

Oz Unity, and Ultimate Editions - Discussion and my opinion.

#5 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,161 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:07:03 PM

Posted 18 December 2015 - 05:30 PM

If its been a while Mint is a good choice, but I am beginning to really favor Manjaro especially if you like KDE.

Manjaros implementation of Plasma 5 and KDE is far better then openSUSE, its got the best KDE5 desktop right now


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#6 Guest_hollowface_*

Guest_hollowface_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 18 December 2015 - 07:32 PM

decided to give OpenSUSE Leap 42.1 a try for my initial foray into Linux
-REF:http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/599835/opensuse-leap-421-or-something-else/#entry3889295

I've got copies of Mint and Fedora on DVD, too.
-REF:http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/599835/opensuse-leap-421-or-something-else/#entry3889295

Cool. I've never tried OpenSUSE, myself. Linux Mint is quite a popular distro and highly recommended for beginners, because:
- It's Ubuntu based, so there is lots of software for it, and instructions for Ubuntu often apply to it too.
- It has good out-of-box hardware support.
- It is available in several flavors which means you don't have to worry about installing your desired desktop-environment, just download
the flavor that has the environment you want.

If you need another distro to try, I'd suggest Lubuntu, which is another Ubuntu derivitive. It's equipped with LXDE as the desktop-environment. I tend to lean towards Ubuntu derivatives since that's where most of my experience is.

It's been years since I last dealt with any Unix system,
-REF:http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/599835/opensuse-leap-421-or-something-else/#entry3889295
Welcome back then.

Dell Inspiron 1720
-REF:http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/599835/opensuse-leap-421-or-something-else/#entry3889295

doesn't seem to recognize the existence of my WiFi card
-REF:http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/599835/opensuse-leap-421-or-something-else/#entry3889295

Wireless Controller     Dell Wireless 1395
-REF:http://www.cnet.com/products/dell-inspiron-1720/specs/

You haven't listed the specs, so I cannot say anything with certaintly, but according to Cnet that computer has a Dell Wireless 1395.

device is supported by the b43 driver; firmware from userspace is required
-REF:https://wiki.debian.org/InstallingDebianOn/Dell/XPSm1530
Broadcom Corporation BCM4312 802.11b/g
-REF:https://wiki.debian.org/InstallingDebianOn/Dell/XPSm1530
These drivers are included as modules in Debian kernel images. Firmware from userspace is required for device operation. Firmware is not packaged by the Debian Project. It must be downloaded and extracted, which can be performed by the firmware-b43-installer, firmware-b43legacy-installer or firmware-b43-lpphy-installer packages during their installation.
-REF:https://wiki.debian.org/bcm43xx
b43 for any new (supported) hardware
b43legacy for BCM4301 and early BCM4306 versions
-REF:https://wireless.wiki.kernel.org/en/users/Drivers/b43
yes BCM4312
-REF:https://wireless.wiki.kernel.org/en/users/Drivers/b43 (Yes, meaning supported)

According to the Debian Wiki, and Kernel.org Wiki, it sounds like the Dell Wireless 1395 is supported by the b43 driver which some kernels (eg: Debian's) have built in, but additionally require "firmware-b43-installer". This is the Debian package-name, but an equivalent package, or alternative package may be available for different distros.

I liked Mint when I was running it off of the DVD
-REF:http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/599835/opensuse-leap-421-or-something-else/#entry3889332

On Linux Mint 17.1 Cinnamon 64bit, "firmware-b43-installer" isn't installed (can't say for the other flavors, likely the same though), but it is available in the default software repositories.
You can install it on Linux Mint using:
sudo apt-get install firmware-b43-installer

You may need to update your package list first on Linux Mint using:

sudo apt-get update

I've never used the package, so I'm not sure what exactly you'll need to do (if anything) beyond that to get the device working. Keep in mind that everything I've written is based on the assumtion that you have a Dell Wireless 1395.
 

EDIT: Some of my quote-boxes have been converted to code-boxes, because I had to many quote-boxes.



#7 shadow-warrior

shadow-warrior

  • Members
  • 188 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nicaragua

Posted 18 December 2015 - 09:39 PM

I had trouble with Opensuse wifi as well  and that was about 4 yrs ago..seems they don't improve...Personally i found it very bloated  and have never seen the need to try it again..also the forums wern't too helpful.

 

Fedora isn't really designed for New users... and can be a PITA if you have  AMD-ATI Graphics or want other Propriety software..i'm not sure if it is still as bad but you couldnt get Catalyst for it as no one would maintain it it the Fusion repos..

Saying that .Korora is Fedora based and  supposed to be OK though i haven't used it..  The best Fedora based Distro ever was Fuduntu....sadly it died due to the change in GTK2 and the Gnome desktop

 

I have never tried Mint but everyone here seems to like it...i am not a fan of fully loaded Distros,  I use Arch and like MadmanRB I run a few Manjaro boxes  which i think are as easy to install use and maintain as any distro going....I have one i installed about 4yrs ago 8.5 i think it was..and it's still running perfect and has never had any major issues though I use Openbox with minimal programs I always have the latest Kernels and programs and it upgrades weekly

 the forums are always helpful and their IRC channel is usually very active..

 

I also Run Gentoo but i doubt if you want the hassle of that to start you on the Linux road.. 

 

Most Debian or Ubuntu based distros shouldn't have WIFI issues ..nor would Manjaro and all have a big user base so any unusual issues will have no doubt been rectified at some time ..  ...it's usually very old machines or very new machines that have problems 


Edited by shadow-warrior, 18 December 2015 - 09:41 PM.


#8 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt

  • Topic Starter

  • Moderator
  • 8,627 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:05:03 PM

Posted 19 December 2015 - 12:13 AM

Thanks to all for the ongoing input.  This was precisely the sort of conversation I was hoping would be spawned.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#9 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt

  • Topic Starter

  • Moderator
  • 8,627 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:07:03 PM

Posted 19 December 2015 - 11:38 PM

Well, I'm having some issues with Linux Mint, too.

 

It's not responding consistently to the mouse (either mouse pad or mouse).  I'm having huge delays in reaction to mouse clicks and non-reaction to others.

 

I am getting an almost constant warning dialog, "Could not grab your mouse.  A malicious client may be eavesdropping on yourn session or you may have just clicked a menu or some application just decided to get focus.  Try again," with a close button that doesn't usually close.  At the moment there is a Firefox window up (I am not connected to the internet, this was one of those things that came up probably from a delayed reaction) and each time I click the close button it's opening a new tab in the Firefox window below the dialog.

 

Any advice?  I haven't been able to get to the terminal yet.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#10 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,161 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:07:03 PM

Posted 19 December 2015 - 11:45 PM

Hrm, what is the make and model of your mouse?

Also is this a clean install of Linux Mint?


Edited by MadmanRB, 19 December 2015 - 11:46 PM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#11 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt

  • Topic Starter

  • Moderator
  • 8,627 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:07:03 PM

Posted 20 December 2015 - 12:28 AM

In this case it's the ALPS Electric mouse pad that came as original equipment on the laptop.

 

I did manage to reboot and get a bit further along.  I had to run the two "sudo" commands you mentioned before.  Just FYI, this is Linux Mint 17.2, Rafaela, 32-bit.  It is also a brand, spankin' new installation.  I just did it this morning.

 

Now I have managed to get selections other than "Ethernet" for network connections.  I tried WiFi, entered what I know for certain is my SSID and then the password on the next tab, but I still don't connect.  I was expecting a behavior a bit more like Windows or OSX in that I presumed I'd get something popping up in the system tray (don't worry, I'll pick up the correct terminology as I go along - but right now I call it the system tray) that would show wireless networks available and let me pick from them.

 

I can tell this is going to be an interesting journey, and perhaps one that I will not take in earnest until 2016.  

 

By the way, I presume the 'su' in sudo means super user, is the do just 'do' and, if not, what does it stand for.  I remember the su command very well from my Unix days, but have no recall of sudo.


Edited by britechguy, 20 December 2015 - 12:28 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#12 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,161 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:07:03 PM

Posted 20 December 2015 - 12:34 AM

sudo = super user do, it basically grants root/admin access without needing a root/admin account.

As for your mouse issue, well considering your reply those mouse touchpads never quite worked to begin with in linux as evidenced in this old video:

perhaps its time to buy an actual mouse

 

Now due to the age of that video I doubt its solution will apply to your setup, but its worth looking into, beware though it does feature editing grub so do take heed.


Edited by MadmanRB, 20 December 2015 - 12:38 AM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#13 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt

  • Topic Starter

  • Moderator
  • 8,627 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:07:03 PM

Posted 20 December 2015 - 12:38 AM

MadmanRB,

 

         Thanks so very much.  I'll dig into this some more tomorrow and definitely watch that video.

 

         This experience will be good for me if for no other reason than it is giving me a vivid revisitation of what it means to be a complete newbie at something computer related, and it's been a while since that's been the case.

 

Brian, who spent some time afternoon installing an MSI GPU and new power supply in a gaming tower (not mine - I don't game)



#14 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,161 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:07:03 PM

Posted 20 December 2015 - 12:41 AM

Just keep in mind this guide, I would not attempt anything in that videro really due to its age and the fact it means editing grub.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SynapticsTouchpad

 

I would go there first before even attempting the solutions seen in the video, editing grub can indeed make your system un bootable requiring a reinstall or command line hyjinks


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users