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Do non-microsoft browsers have a method for Microsoft's Windows Updates?


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#1 cmptrgy

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 09:01 AM

Yesterday I serviced a Win7 Toshiba laptop that was in tough shape: it's performance was terrible. A big part of the problem was that the computer was umpteen behind in Windows Updates plus the owner had just about every Microsoft Office product and all of them needed Windows Updates, both security and updates. OK that's not the first time I've seen that; however, the owner uses Google Chrome as his browser.

My questions are

Aren't Microsoft's Windows Updates supposed to be kept up to date even when a different browser is being used?

And doesn't Google Chrome or other browsers have a method for that to happen?

Fortunately the good news is the computer is back to running like new again.



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#2 Aura

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 09:24 AM

Only Microsoft products (and certain drivers pushed via Windows Updates) are being updated via Windows Updates. Other products and web browsers uses their own update process/program. Google Chrome uses the Google Update Program, while Mozilla Firefox uses the Mozilla Maintenance Service (I think). So no, Windows Update isn't responsible for the update of other web browsers, other than Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge (on Windows 10).

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#3 britechguy

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 10:53 AM

I will confirm Aura's statement.  Other than for third-party drivers, which often get submitted to Microsoft for inclusion in Windows Updates, I have no third-party software, including Firefox, Chrome, CCleaner, and the list goes on that get updated via Windows Updates.  When each was installed I was presented with an option as to whether I wanted to "check for updates" and I always set that to yes.  Updates to software are generally not done "just for fun" these days.

 

The computer you describe is the perfect example of why I strongly encourage my clients to keep Windows Update set to either fully automatic or "download but let me choose when/what to install."  Full automatic is problematic for those who leave their computers on constantly and may have "active work" that they've walked away from in several programs.  Even though most programs now do automatic incremental saves so that changes can be recovered if the machine goes down for any reason, not all do.  It's a nasty surprise if automatic updates do a system restart when you don't expect it.

 

The latest versions of Chrome are set up to automatically update when new versions are available, but they don't restart by themselves.  The "pancake button" at the upper right will change color when an update becomes available and it wants you to restart.  It starts out green when the update is just released, turns yellow if you don't restart within a couple of days, and turns red if you still haven't restarted for a few days after that.


Edited by britechguy, 18 December 2015 - 10:57 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#4 cmptrgy

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 12:16 PM

Thanks for your inputs. I did suspect that other browsers are not expected to be helpful toward a process to keep the underlying foundation of an OS up to date and this isn't the first time I've seen this situation happen but I had to finally inquire about it.

 

I understand other browsers are responsible for their own updates and Microsoft Windows Updates wouldn't accommodate that: my thinking is that the underlying foundation still needs to be kept updated and it appears to me many users don't bother and then they give me blank face when I try to explain that.

 

But then on the Microsoft Windows Updates I can't believe how many IE users don't even understand that themselves.

 

Anyway the good thing the computer I checked out yesterday had to get caught up on about 75 updates and is running as well as it should be. BTW none of them had anything to do with upgrading to the free Windows 10 upgrade yet.



#5 britechguy

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 01:00 PM

Anyway the good thing the computer I checked out yesterday had to get caught up on about 75 updates and is running as well as it should be. BTW none of them had anything to do with upgrading to the free Windows 10 upgrade yet.


Trying to get the non-technical to understand the technical, even in a cursory way, is often a herculean task. My analogy for what you were talking about is either that the OS is the field and the programs and apps are the plants or that the OS is the foundation and the programs and apps are the building that goes up on that foundation. In either analogy, if the field or the foundation is not good you can't expect anything else to be good that depends upon it.

I'll bet that this computer will be very much like any other when it's "fresh out of the box": there will be days and days of updates that download and apply. I always tell anyone who I set up a new system for that they should leave it on constantly for at least three or four days and expect that there will be a slew of Windows Updates that will be applied over that time period.

If there is a concern regarding the Windows 10 upgrade (GWX) stuff on the part of this client I'd just install GWX control panel before returning the machine and telling them that I installed it and why.

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