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Speaker hardware volume


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#1 jeaniev

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 12:18 PM

This may be trivial, but I want to be able to control the sound level by adjusting the volume knob on my speaker. It is a lot easier than having to open the volume control on the computer and adjusting it there. The speakers worked that way with my XP computer but the volume control knob on the speaker does nothing now. I do get sound out of the speakers, and can adjust the volume from the windows control in the sys tray, but would like to use the speaker knob. I already checked to be sure the latest driver was installed.  Any suggestions will be appreciated.



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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 12:23 PM

Can't you just turn the volume up to 100% using the Windows control in the system tray, and then use the volume control on your speaker.

 

Also have you gone to the control panel, hardware and sound, and messed around with the volume there?


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#3 jeaniev

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 12:37 PM

Hi, Rocky,

I tried turning up the volume to 100% and then using the speaker volume control. Volume stays at 100%.  I also went to the control panel, messed with the volume, and checked for the latest driver (told me I had the latest driver).  So can you use the volume control on your speakers? These speakers are 9 years old but still work just fine except for this problem. I hate to go buy new speakers just for this.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 01:14 PM

It sounds to me like your volume control rheostat in the speakers themselves may have finally bitten the dust.  These volume control knobs on the speakers work entirely independently of any device driver and are an analog adjustment just like every speaker control knob you've ever used (or at least all the ones I've had experience with are).

 

My only quick recommendation would be to remove whatever cover (probably on the bottom of the speaker) you can that gives you access to the "innards" of the volume control and give them a quick spritz of either TV Tuner Cleaner (yes, you can still buy this at places like Radio Shack) or a deoxidizing spray like Caig DeOxIt or similar.  Sometimes it's that the rheostat has become dirty over the years.

 

You can test out whether my theory is correct by plugging these speakers into something like the output jack on your smartphone and play music from there.  Provided there is any output to the speakers from the device (that is, it can't be muted or else there's no signal to adjust) your speaker volume knob should be able to boost or reduce the volume there.  I suspect you'll find it's not working on other devices, either.


Edited by britechguy, 12 December 2015 - 01:15 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 jeaniev

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 02:52 PM

Hi Brian,

I fixed it!  I read your suggestion about plugging it into something else. Which made me think - the speakers came from another computer, one had a blue plug and one had a green one, color coded to the back of the old computer, but of course not to the new one. So I thought, what if I just reverse the two speaker plugs and see what happens and Voila!!  it works!!  So thanks for your suggestion which put that spark in my brain!!  It's my husband's new computer and I'm the techie in the house. So now the speaker thing is one less thing for him to complain about (why doesn't this work, why can't I do this, what does this mean?)  !!   I'm glad I found this forum.  I'm sure I'll be back again.. Thanks again for your help!



#6 britechguy

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 03:09 PM

jeaniev,

 

           You're quite welcome.  This sort of thing is far more common an occurrence than many would like to admit, and it's an easy fix.

 

           If you feel like it take a look at my profile and go to my webpage.  I mention just this sort of "wiring mix-up" as one of the reasons I far prefer to do service calls on site than to have someone bring their equipment to me.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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