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Western Digital Raptor


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#1 JPHarvey

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 12:27 AM

Heya,

Has anyone got one of those 10000rpm HDD's yet? Mainly talking the WD Raptor SATA drive (the rest seem to be SCSI drives - let me know if there are others).

I want to know if it does in fact speed up processing, gaming (and loading - not that I play games, it is interactive simulated training for life in a post-apocalyptic warzone...with aliens and stuff) and generally is it worth the extra money?

Also, does it require additional cooling, is it prone to failure, and would it work better in RAID configuration...???

Any info and opinions welcome - ocme one come all!
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#2 Albert Frankenstein

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 06:50 AM

In theory they are faster. Noticably faster??? I am not sure if you would see noticable improvement, perhaps others can comment on that. It will produce significant heat. Be sure you have good air movement and the proper fans, not only to cool the hard drive, but to remove this heated air from your computer so that the added heat does not affect the other components.

would it work better in RAID configuration

What is your definition of better, and what flavor of RAID are you refering to?
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#3 JPHarvey

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 11:53 PM

Well I've heard that (and I don't really understand RAID all that well yet) two identical HDDs will work faster (I should have said - as in data transfer rates) in RAID 0 than each would work as a single hard drive. Actually, if you (or anyone) can give me the drift of the RAID configurations (goes up to RAID 5??) that would be cool (rather than me reading about it.. :thumbsup: )
[CPU]Intel E6600 Core 2 Duo @ 3.19GHz
[MoBo]ASUS P5N32-SLI Premium (nForce590)
[RAM]4GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2-800 CL4 @ 710MHz
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[PSU]CoolerMaster 1kW
[Audio]ASUS Xonar D2
[Case]Antec Nine Hundred
[OS]Windows Vista Ultimate 64
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#4 Albert Frankenstein

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 07:47 AM

RAID 0 is, in theory, faster at retrieving information. However, you need to determine how much speed you need, and understand the risks involved.

1) how much speed do you need? If you are looking for fast data retrieval (this is most important in a server as this is a server's function) then a RAID array that uses some form of striping would be wanted. This could mean RAID 0 or RAID 5 (the most common server configuration). But in your case, what are we comparing the speed to? A parallel hard drive? Then go to SATA 1.5, as that will be faster. You need/want more speed? Then go to SATA 3.0. Get a hard drive with the largest cache. This will give you the best data retrieval speeds, and are just fine for most personal, and most business needs as well - no RAID needed.

2)the dangers of striping: What if one of your hard drive fails? You will end up with one good hard drive with a bunch of useless 1/2 information on it. In effect, you will have lost everything! If you plan on using RAID 0, have a good backup/disaster recovery plan.

Or, what if your hard drives are fine, but your mobo fails next year. A direct replacement mobo cannot be found as they are no longer available for sale. How are you going to recover your data?

These are the danger issues with using striping.

As far as explaining the various types of RAID and their advantages/disadvantages at large, I don't think using this site and the helpers because you are lazy is the way to go. I don't think you will find a lot of support for that. However, just by Googling what is RAID you will find a wealth of info that I suggest you read over.

Again for most home users, RAID 0 or RAID 1 or RAID 10 are the best choices, and in some cases the only choices as that is all the mobos will support.

Let us know if you have any other specific questions.
ALBERT FRANKENSTEIN
I'M SO SMART IT'S SCARY!


Currently home chillin' with the fam and my two dogs!


#5 Xpert

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 08:09 AM

Raid. Everything you need to know :thumbsup:

#6 JPHarvey

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 04:37 PM

Hey thanks, I actually went and looked it up on Wikipedia anyway (straight after I posted) and it pointed me to the same issues you raised regarding HDD failure. Additionally, although the drive will be faster, it theoretically will last half as long as the drive would (in MFFT) as a single drive.
I already run SATA II, and really for what I want I guess running a single drive will be better.

But........I still want to hear from someone that has a RAPTOR, and tell me if it is noticably quicker. I read a review which tetsed data rates against a standard 7200rpm drive - but what actual performance improvement is there, because the numbers are often different to reality!!

Thanks again guys.
[CPU]Intel E6600 Core 2 Duo @ 3.19GHz
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#7 linderman

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 05:16 PM

Yes the Raptor is noticibly faster


is it worth the bigger price tag ?????? I am not convinced I have sold probally 10 of them and set them up as boot drives >>>. they do access data and run apps faster

a very good comparison is the diff in speed between a IDE drive and Sata is the same improvement going from 7200 rpm sata drive to the Raptor

yes the run hotter about 10 degrees C hottet than an IDE drive and about 7C hotter than a 7200 rpm sata drive

#8 JPHarvey

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 05:33 PM

Cool thanks...

Do you reckon the additional temp (C) would justify additional cooling? Like those purpose built HDD fan kits?

Actually, I've just been doing some looking......

The Raptor is SATA 1.5Gb/s, 10,000rpm (with 8mb or 16mb cache). My Samsung is SATA 3Gb/s, but 7,200rpm (with 8mb cache). My MoBo supports SATA-II 3GB/s so what are the differences going to be there? :thumbsup:

Edited by JPHarvey, 26 July 2006 - 08:48 PM.

[CPU]Intel E6600 Core 2 Duo @ 3.19GHz
[MoBo]ASUS P5N32-SLI Premium (nForce590)
[RAM]4GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2-800 CL4 @ 710MHz
[GPU]XFX 8800 GTX 768MB [SLI] @ Stock
[PSU]CoolerMaster 1kW
[Audio]ASUS Xonar D2
[Case]Antec Nine Hundred
[OS]Windows Vista Ultimate 64
[LCD]SAMSUNG 226BW
[Other]WC'd CPU & SLI

#9 Mr Alpha

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 03:13 AM

In a home computing enviroment there is no difference between SATA and SATA 2.
"Anyone who cannot form a community with others, or who does not need to because he is self-sufficient [...] is either a beast or a god." Aristotle
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#10 JPHarvey

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 05:27 PM

Surely though there would be a difference between 1.5 and 3GB/s?
[CPU]Intel E6600 Core 2 Duo @ 3.19GHz
[MoBo]ASUS P5N32-SLI Premium (nForce590)
[RAM]4GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2-800 CL4 @ 710MHz
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[PSU]CoolerMaster 1kW
[Audio]ASUS Xonar D2
[Case]Antec Nine Hundred
[OS]Windows Vista Ultimate 64
[LCD]SAMSUNG 226BW
[Other]WC'd CPU & SLI

#11 Mr Alpha

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 03:36 AM

First the speeds are 1,5 Gb/s and 3 Gb/s, not 3 GB/s. They also translate into practical peak throughput of 150 MB/s and 300 MB/s. The 150 GB raptor has a max transfer speed of about 90 MB/s which isn't even close the the 150 MB/s of SATA. Which makes the extra 150 MB/s you get from SATA 300 MB/s pointless, at least for hard-drives.
"Anyone who cannot form a community with others, or who does not need to because he is self-sufficient [...] is either a beast or a god." Aristotle
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