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#1 kygiacomo

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 08:05 PM

Well its nearly time for my anti virus to expire and i was just wanting to know what u guys would recommend as the best for the 2016 year? i used mcafee all this year on my new computer i bought last dec and so far i think its done well,however it is a resource hog so im looking for something with great protection that is also light on the system. i also just bought a new 1yr subsription for malwarebytes so anything i buy for internet security suites/anti virus will need to be compatible with it..thanks guys



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#2 quietman7

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 09:04 PM

You ask a common question for which you will receive varying opinions and recommendations. There is no universal "one size fits all" solution that works for everyone and there is no single best anti-virus. Every vendor's virus lab and program scanning engine is different. Each has has its own strengths and weaknesses and they often use a mix of technologies to detect and remove malware. In many cases choosing an anti-virus is a matter of personal preference and what works best on a particular system. You may need to experiment and find the one most suitable for your needs.

Although McAfee is as good as any other well known anti-virus program, it requires numerous services and running processes that consume a lot of system resources and often results in complaints of high CPU usage. Anti-virus software components insert themselves deep into the operating systems core where they install kernel mode drivers that load at boot-up and create files/folders/registry entries in various locations. If you do a Google Search you will find there have been numerous complaints about it affecting system performance.

Further McAfee products, like Symantec, are becoming difficult to remove and remnants are often left behind which require the use of a special removal tool, otherwise you may encounter problems installing a replacement anti-virus. To be fair, other vendors also recommend using removal tools for the same reason. Those issues plus the cost factor are the primary reason many folks look for a free alternative. IMO, McAfee is better utilized in an Enterprise system environment protecting many client computers.

Here are links to some recent BC discussion topics with opinions from other members:Here are links to BC polls:I generally recommend ESET NOD32 Anti-Virus or Emsisoft Anti-Malware as they leave a small footprint...meaning they are not intrusive and do not utilize a lot of system resources. Kaspersky Anti-virus is also a good choice for the same reason. If you don't want to pay then I would recommend avast! Free Antivirus or Bitdefender Anti-virus Free Edition if you prefer not to use Windows 8/10 Defender.


For more suggestions see Choosing an Anti-Virus Program.
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#3 Wolverine 7

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 09:12 PM

Well i could recommend Vipre,gives solid protection and is very light with its resource footprint.You can use its trial version to see if you like it.

 

http://www.vipreantivirus.com/



#4 mainer21

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 11:44 PM

Here is one more resource.

 

What Is The Best Antivirus For My PC? A Step-By-Step Research Guide

https://heimdalsecurity.com/blog/what-is-the-best-antivirus/



#5 Sintharius

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 06:04 AM

Well i could recommend Vipre,gives solid protection and is very light with its resource footprint.You can use its trial version to see if you like it.

Strictly speaking, if one compares test results in independent labs then Vipre isn't any better than Microsoft Security Essentials/Windows Defender. (Edit: From AVC's latest results, it looks like Vipre is actually worse.)

I would go with Emsisoft or ESET as quietman7 said... both offer excellent antivirus protection (and in Emsisoft's case, also antimalware protection), lightweight, easy to use and have good customer support.

Edited by Alexstrasza, 09 December 2015 - 06:07 AM.


#6 quietman7

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 06:55 AM

Yes...an anti-virus program alone does not provide comprehensive protection and cannot prevent, detect and remove all threats at any given time. Anti-virus software is inherently reactive...meaning it usually finds malware after a computer has been infected. Further, if you're dealing with zero-day malware it's unlikely the anti-virus is going to detect anything. Anti-virus and anti-malware programs each perform different tasks as it relates to computer security and threat detection. Essentially, they look for and remove different types of malicious threats. In simplistic terms, Anti-virus programs generally scan for infectious malware which includes viruses, worms, Trojans, rootkis and bots.

Therefore, you need both an anti-virus and an anti-malware solution for maximum protection.
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#7 kygiacomo

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 11:50 AM

thanks so much everyone for the replies. i noticed on different reviews last nite that it all depends on who does the reports on each antivirus they all have different reports lol. one said viper was the best another said bitedefender and another had mcafee ranked #1 lol.



#8 quietman7

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 12:10 PM

There are several reputable labs which test the effectiveness of major anti-virus programs and security suites to include AV-Comparatives.org, Virus Bulletin Comparative Tests, AV-Test.org, NSS Labs Consumer Anti-Malware Products Group Test Report, etc.

These kinds of comparative testing results will vary depending on a variety of factors to include but not limited to who conducted the testing, what they were testing for (type of threats, attack vectors, exploits), what versions of anti-virus software was tested, what type of scanning engine was used, and the ability to clean or repair. There are no universally predefined set of standards or criteria for testing which means each test will yield different results. As such, you need to look for detailed information about how the tests were conducted, the procedures used, objectivity and data results. Read Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organization: AMTSO Fundamental Principles of Testing.

Each security vendor uses their own testing/analysis methodology to identify various types of malware so the detection results are not always the same.Some of the testing criteria and standards may even be misleading.

...for some unknown reason...the renowned German test lab AV-TEST has quietly (there was no warning) modified its certification process. The changes mean that the certificates produced by the new rules are, to put it mildly, pretty useless for evaluating the merits of different AV products...With AV-TEST’s new certification standards, the onus is on the user to carefully investigate the actual results of each individual test…they may find that a product that blocked 99.9% of attacks has the same “certification” as a product that only blocked 55%.

Comparative testing: A bit of background for the uninitiated
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#9 Wolverine 7

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 05:24 PM

Strictly speaking, if one compares test results in independent labs then Vipre isn't any better than Microsoft Security Essentials/Windows Defender. (Edit: From AVC's latest results, it looks like Vipre is actually worse.)

 

Well im going by personal experience,having tried most of the well known av,s at some stage,as the op states,test results are variable in consistenct to say the least.

 

All i can say is that vipre has been rock solid while used on two of my systems and the op wanted something with a low impact on resources which Vipre definatelly

has (one reason i like it).

 

Of course in the end Antivirus is a personal choice down to what works for you.Recomended to use Malmarebytes in safemode as a backup,some kind of anti zero day exploit protection (Winpatrol,Malwarebytes Antiexploit) and some kind of ransomware defence wouldnt go amis,(Cryptoprevent,Cryptomonitor).



#10 kygiacomo

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 06:05 PM

im going with Eset internet security trial first and then i will try vipre trial and see whats up and i already have malwarebytes premium edition. i also have malwarebytes anti exploit premium so i think that should cover me for the next 365 days. thanks everyone to everyone that posted u guys are a wealth of knowledge to me since im not the most computer savy guy


Edited by kygiacomo, 09 December 2015 - 06:08 PM.


#11 quietman7

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 06:28 PM

...Recomended to use Malmarebytes in safemode as a backup...

Scanning with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware in safe mode will work but removal functions are not as powerful in safe mode. Malwarebytes is designed to be at full power when malware is running so safe mode is not necessary when using it. In fact, Malwarebytes loses some effectiveness for detection and removal when used in safe mode because the program includes a special driver which does not work in safe mode. Further, scanning in safe mode prevents some types of malware from running so it may be missed during the detection process. Additionally, there are various types of malware infections which target the safeboot keyset so booting into safe mode is not always possible. For optimal removal, normal mode is recommended so it does not limit the abilities of Malwarebytes. Doing a safe mode scan should only be done when a regular mode scan fails or you cannot boot up normally.

If that is the case, after completing a safe mode scan, rebooting normally, updating the database definitions and rescanning again is recommended.
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#12 Wolverine 7

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 09:55 PM

Scanning with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware in safe mode will work but removal functions are not as powerful in safe mode. Malwarebytes is designed to be at full power when malware is running so safe mode is not necessary when using it. In fact, Malwarebytes loses some effectiveness for detection and removal when used in safe mode because the program includes a special driver which does not work in safe mode. Further, scanning in safe mode prevents some types of malware from running so it may be missed during the detection process. Additionally, there are various types of malware infections which target the safeboot keyset so booting into safe mode is not always possible. For optimal removal, normal mode is recommended so it does not limit the abilities of Malwarebytes. Doing a safe mode scan should only be done when a regular mode scan fails or you cannot boot up normally.

If that is the case, after completing a safe mode scan, rebooting normally, updating the database definitions and rescanning again is recommended.

 

Yes thanks,funny thing is i just did exactly that and worked that out.

 

Doing a safe mode scan should only be done when a regular mode scan fails or you cannot boot up normally.

 

 

I always understood Safe mode scans were effective because a lot of malware wont run in that mode and so can be picked up even if it cant in normal mode?



#13 Sintharius

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 06:47 AM

I always understood Safe mode scans were effective because a lot of malware wont run in that mode and so can be picked up even if it cant in normal mode?

From what I understand, Safe Mode only prevents some malware from running, and thus they do not stop the tools. Detection in Safe Mode is actually weaker as specialized drivers cannot load.
 

im going with Eset internet security trial first and then i will try vipre trial and see whats up and i already have malwarebytes premium edition. i also have malwarebytes anti exploit premium so i think that should cover me for the next 365 days. thanks everyone to everyone that posted u guys are a wealth of knowledge to me since im not the most computer savy guy

Just a heads up, ESET Smart Security also contains an Exploit Blocker module. Using two antiexploit applications at once will decrease your protection against exploits, not increasing it.

Edited by Alexstrasza, 10 December 2015 - 06:47 AM.


#14 quietman7

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 07:39 AM

...I always understood Safe mode scans were effective because a lot of malware wont run in that mode and so can be picked up even if it cant in normal mode?


Safe Mode is a troubleshooting mode designed to start Windows with minimal drivers and running processes to diagnose problems with your computer. This means some of the programs that normally start when Windows starts will not run.

Why use safe mode? The Windows operating system protects files when they are being accessed by an application or a program. Malware writers create programs that can insert itself and hide in these protected areas when the files are being used. Using safe mode reduces the number of modules requesting files to only essentials which make your computer functional. This in turn reduces the number of hiding places for malware, making it easier to find and delete the offending files when performing scans with anti-virus and anti-malware tools. In many cases, performing your scans in safe mode speeds up the scanning process. Scanning in safe mode was a recommended course of action years ago with many security scanners. This was before malware writers began to employ more sophisticated techniques to counter removal efforts in that mode and before we had programs like Malwarebytes which work effectively in normal mode.

Why not use safe mode? Some security tools like anti-rootkit scanners (ARKs) and scanning programs with anti-rootkit technology use special drivers which are required for the scanning and removal process. These tools are designed to work in normal mode because the drivers will not load in safe mode which lessens the scan's effectiveness. Other security tools are optimized to run from normal mode where they are most effective.

Further, scanning in safe mode prevents some types of malware from running so it may be missed during the detection process. If the malware is not related to a running process (i.e. malicious .dll) it probably will not make a difference performing a scan in normal or safe mode. A hidden piece of malware such as a rootkit which protects other malicious files and registry keys from deletion may not be detected in either mode without the use of special tools. Additionally, if the scanner you're using does not include definitions for the malware, then they may not detect or remove it regardless of what mode is used. If you're dealing with zero-day malware it's unlikely your anti-virus is going to detect anything. However, programs like Malwarebytes can detect zero-day malware and is one reason they are recommended to supplement your anti-virus software. Also keep in mind that there are various types of malware infections which target the safeboot keyset so booting into safe mode is not always possible.
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#15 Wolverine 7

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 05:57 PM

From what I understand, Safe Mode only prevents some malware from running, and thus they do not stop the tools. Detection in Safe Mode is actually weaker as specialized drivers cannot load.

 

Yes but equally some malware is easier to remove,or can only be  removed in Safemode,as Quiteman7 said some time ago.

 

Why use safe mode? The Windows operating system protects files when they are being accessed by an application or a program. Malware writers create programs that can insert itself and hide in these protected areas when the files are being used. Using safe mode reduces the number of modules requesting files to only essentials which make your computer functional. This in turn reduces the number of hiding places for malware, making it easier to find and delete the offending files when performing scans with anti-virus and anti-malware tools. In many cases, performing your scans in safe mode speeds up the scanning process.

Why not use safe mode? Some security tools like anti-rootkit scanners (ARKs) and programs with anti-rootkit technology use special drivers which are required for the scanning and removal process. These tools are designed to work in normal mode because the drivers will not load in safe mode which lessens the scan's effectiveness. Other security tools are optimized to run from normal mode where they are most effective. For example, Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is designed to be at full power when malware is running so safe mode is not necessary when using it. In fact, Malwarebytes loses some effectiveness for detection and removal when used in safe mode. For optimal removal, normal mode is recommended so it does not limit the abilities of Malwarebytes.

 

So its not a bad idea to use both i think.


Edited by Wolverine 7, 10 December 2015 - 05:57 PM.





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