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Will I have a job with an AAS?


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#1 acerthorn

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 04:40 PM

I'm currently planning on returning to college after a multi-year absence. I want to change my major to IT, since that seems to be what I'm good at.

However, I recently learned that, shortly after my previous withdrawal, Congress put in a new 6-year lifetime limit on Pell Grants ... and that this limit was to be applied retroactively.

I've already spent five semesters getting pell grants, which means I'm just one semester short of being able to complete my bachelor's degree (and only two of my classes will be able to transfer from my old major, so I won't be able to shave off an entire semester based purely on transfer credits).

As you can see from this link ...

http://www.atu.edu/academics/catalog/colleges/applied_sciences/dept_comp_info_sci.html

... the AAS in information technology (scroll down to the bottom) has me taking the exact same classes as a Bachelor's in IT (right above the AAS). I'm just taking the classes in a different order, is all (e.g. in the bachelor's cirriculum, business speaking is taken during Junior Fall semester, whereas it's taken in the Sophmore Spring semester during the AAS).

Would I be likely to get a job - maybe just an entry level "geek squad" computer repair at Best Buy, or some other similar position - with just an AAS? Maybe I could get my AAS, and leave open the possibility of continuing towards a bachelor's degree (possibly part-time, online).


Edited by hamluis, 07 December 2015 - 04:56 PM.
Moved from Gen Chat to IT Certifications - Hamluis.


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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 10:50 AM

If you're just looking for an entry level job CompTIA's A+ is what you need.  A degree is what you'll want when you apply for more advanced positions.  I don't know that a degree will get you an entry level job if you don't have the A+ certification.  A lot of it depends on the employer.  A lot will pass you up because they will see you as over qualified.  The A+ will get you the calls from the recruiters for temp positions.  I recommend taking a few of those temp jobs so that you can gain real world experience.



#3 acerthorn

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 11:53 AM

If you're just looking for an entry level job CompTIA's A+ is what you need. 

Huh?  What is that? 

 

I tried looking on the link you gave me, but all it seems to advertise is an exam. But ... wouldn't I still need to go to college in order to learn the things needed for the exam?  Or, is this an online class?



#4 dannyboy950

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 06:21 PM

As Kilroy pointed out there are some general Computer certifications that may get your foot in the door quicker than a degree. CompTIA is a good example.

More hands on than class room.  When I wastrying to break into the business years ago I had an associate degree in computer science that I quit mentioning because most of the jobs offered, Human Resources said I was overqualified for.

 

I learned more about computers hands-on ,on my own than I ever learned in the classroom.

BC actually has some good deals of study materials and certification. packages.


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#5 acerthorn

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 08:15 PM

When I wastrying to break into the business years ago I had an associate degree in computer science that I quit mentioning because most of the jobs offered, Human Resources said I was overqualified for.

 

Wait ... that doesn't make any sense. I've looked on monster.com, indeed.com, and many other personnel websites. The entry level listings they posted very clearly called for a bachelor's degree.



#6 dannyboy950

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 08:37 PM

I am referring to 30 years ago and local employment here in texas.  And frankly even then what was being offered and advertised on line you were never actually offered when you actually went to apply.  Headhunters are paid on commission, they promiss the moon but can seldom deliver.

 

Things may be way different now. I do not know have not looked at an ad since 2011.


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#7 acerthorn

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 09:00 PM

And frankly even then what was being offered and advertised on line you were never actually offered when you actually went to apply. 

Wait ... what?
 

 

Headhunters are paid on commission, they promiss the moon but can seldom deliver.

Huh?  Who are headhunters? And what kind of commission are they paid on?  And what exactly do they not deliver on?



#8 Kilroy

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 03:19 PM

Oh boy, you've got a lot of rude awakings coming.  A lot of the IT jobs work like this.  Big Company posts to recruiters that they are looking to fill position X and give a list of requirements that no person on earth fills, except maybe the person that just left the job.  All of the recruiters scour the job boards for people who remotely bare some resemblance to the person Big Company is looking for.  You go through a phone interview and they decide from that if they want to submit you to Big Company, if they submit too much garbage Big Company might not even look at their stuff in the future.  Big Company gets a ton of possible candidates from the many recruiting companies and picks the people they are interested in for in person interviews.  From those in person interview Big Company may or may not offer a job.

 

The part about jobs that don't exist.  Some of the recruiting companies post jobs that don't actually exist to add to their pool of possible applicants.  I've found this to be true of the bigger employment agencies.

 

I've had better experience with employment agencies I've never heard of, my last three jobs have all been through companies I've never heard of prior.  My current agency offered me $3 an hour above what I was asking, granted I'm not on the lower end and have a vast amount of experience.  The larger agencies would have paid me what I was asking and pocketed the $3 as profit.

 

Contract work isn't for everyone.  If you don't work a day on a contract job you don't get paid.  So, sick time, holidays, and vacations are all unpaid.  A lot of the time you can turn a contract job into a full time position.  I've done this twice so far and am working on a third.  A lot of it depends on you.

 

One of the big advantages of working contract work is that you gain a lot of experience in different environments and can see things that work well and things that don't.  Additionally you can acquire experience in different industries.  I've worked in banking, automotive, aerospace, health care, and more.

 

Back to my original post.  A+ is a certification that you don't need to go to college to get.  You can self study or take a course.  A+ is a basic hardware certification.  Network+ is a basic network certification.  I have both, from before you had to renew them.  Once you obtain a certification you only need to maintain them if required by your employer or if you want a new job.  Certifications, for the most part, do not translate to the real world.  However, they will give you a solid foundation to build upon.



#9 acerthorn

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 03:42 PM

Does it cost anything to take the A+ exam? Also, does it cost anything to study for the exam?



#10 KingDavidlll

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Posted 14 December 2015 - 02:47 AM

Basically it costs around $200 to take the exam depending on your location.

 

To study for the exam can be completely free.  They provide what information you need to know online and you can do self-research and figure it out before taking the exam, and there are plenty of resources to help for free.  However if you want to use their customised training program, it does cost $300 which includes the training course, the exam and a free retake if you need it.

http://certification.comptia.org/certifications/a



#11 acerthorn

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Posted 14 December 2015 - 02:49 AM

Ok, what would you recommend is the best free online study tool for this cert?






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