Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

My PC fails to boot: Is it a PSU issue?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 ChesterMonty

ChesterMonty

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:44 AM

Posted 06 December 2015 - 02:53 PM

I have owned my Gateway DX4300 PC (specs in link, although I'm running Windows 7 64-bit instead of Vista) since late 2009, and it's served me well for years. For the past few months; however, it would randomly crash to a black "no signal" screen, mostly while running more intensive programs like games, but it would sometimes crash on less intensive programs such as Firefox. Once it crashes, the audio stutters, then goes silent, the computer's fans continue to run as normal, and the hard drive read/write light continues to blink. At this point, I had to hold down the power button to shut off the computer. After powering on the PC, the boot process would fail, randomly crashing to a black screen. It would take several tries to reboot properly, but it worked for the most part.

Now, last week, these boot failures were exacerbated after a power outage. The computer will no longer boot to desktop normally, no matter how many attempts.

When I try to turn the PC back on, one of these things will happen:

1. PC will power on, PSU/CPU fans will spin, HDD makes sounds, but no monitor signal or POST beep. GPU fan speeds up, then slows down. The sound of the GPU fan speeding up and slowing down usually means the boot process failed, and this behavior is carried across all failed boot attempts.

2. PC powers on, monitor receives a signal, but it hangs on a black screen with a blinking cursor in the top-left corner. Very rarely, it will POST beep, but it may still fail to boot.

3. PC powers on, POST beep, and Gateway BIOS splash screen displays. It will not complete the boot process and crash to a black screen soon after.

4. PC powers on, POST beep but no monitor signal or BIOS splash. I can still interact with the computer as if it were working normally, but no video or audio. I can log in and shut down the computer blindly with the right keystrokes.

5. PC powers on, but the POST beep is one long beep and two short beeps. No monitor signal.

I've tried cleaning the dust out of the case, plugging the computer into a different outlet, reseating the GPU, reseating the RAM, booting up the PC with less RAM inserted, and none of these things fixed the issue. I replaced the CMOS battery with a new one back in August, so it probably isn't that.

I've done some research on this issue, and internet consensus seems to be that the Gateway DX4300 ships with a very weak PSU of only 300w. Most of what my PC does seems to be in line with common symptoms of PSU failure, so I'd like to hear some other opinions on this issue, and if it is a PSU issue, what's a good, budget PSU to use for the Gateway DX4300? Preferably one that is near $50 on Amazon.com, so I can use my gift card credit. Thanks for reading my rambling; I appreciate any help that you guys can give.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 richcbro

richcbro

  • Members
  • 375 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:44 PM

Posted 07 December 2015 - 01:14 AM

It sound like you have problems with the computer hardware, especially the graphics card and PSU.

 

1. This indicate problems with the GPU. Try to insert the GPU into another PC, and check if it will boot.

2. Could be the problems with motherboard, the BIOS corrupted, or CPU and RAM are damaged.

3. Motherboard, CPU or RAM has problems.

4. GPU problems.

5. 1 long + 2 short means GPU problems.

 

These problems can also caused by PSU issue. Buy a better PSU, at least 450W, and see if your computer will boot properly.


Edited by batman1234, 07 December 2015 - 01:18 AM.

CPU: Intel i7-8700K 5.3 GHz ------ RAM: 32GB TridentZ 3600 MHz CL16 ----- Motherboard: Asus ROG Maximus X Formula ----- GPU: Zotac GTX 1080 Ti Amp! Extreme ----- Storage: Samsung 960 Pro 1TB -- Samsung 850 Pro 2TB x4


#3 ChesterMonty

ChesterMonty
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:44 AM

Posted 08 December 2015 - 10:48 AM

It sound like you have problems with the computer hardware, especially the graphics card and PSU.

 

1. This indicate problems with the GPU. Try to insert the GPU into another PC, and check if it will boot.

2. Could be the problems with motherboard, the BIOS corrupted, or CPU and RAM are damaged.

3. Motherboard, CPU or RAM has problems.

4. GPU problems.

5. 1 long + 2 short means GPU problems.

 

These problems can also caused by PSU issue. Buy a better PSU, at least 450W, and see if your computer will boot properly.

 

Hey thanks for the reply! I'm going to have to dig up my older PC to test out the GPU, which may take a while to do. I hope I don't have to replace my motherboard or RAM. How would I test the motherboard to see if it's broken?

 

I'm also not sure if it's a corrupted BIOS issue, as I was able to go into the BIOS menu during one bootup attempt. The PC quickly crashed to a black screen after being on for about 30 seconds though.

 

I forgot to mention it in my earlier post, but the exact power supply make/model I have is a Liteon 300W PS-6301-08A. I've been thinking it was a PSU issue, mostly from all the posts I've read on the internet complaining about the Gateway DX4300's power supply. (posts like these, there's more elsewhere). Apparently, I'm very lucky to have been using this power supply for so long without any issue!

 

I was going to pick up this EVGA 500W Power Supply; it seems like it'll work just fine with my PC. The reviews on Amazon and PC component websites seem good. Any other opinions on PSUs that are on Amazon? Money is tight, so I'm probably just going to upgrade the PSU, not anything else unless I have to replace another broken part.


Edited by ChesterMonty, 08 December 2015 - 11:24 AM.


#4 Captain_Chicken

Captain_Chicken

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,354 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:44 AM

Posted 08 December 2015 - 09:55 PM

EVGA makes good power supplies.. just watch out for those cheap off-brand psus.

Computer Collection:

Spoiler

Spoiler

Spoiler

Spoiler

#5 richcbro

richcbro

  • Members
  • 375 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:44 PM

Posted 10 December 2015 - 05:37 AM

EVGA always make good power supply. But before you go and buy a power supply, please test your GPU first. It might no be the problem of PSU.


CPU: Intel i7-8700K 5.3 GHz ------ RAM: 32GB TridentZ 3600 MHz CL16 ----- Motherboard: Asus ROG Maximus X Formula ----- GPU: Zotac GTX 1080 Ti Amp! Extreme ----- Storage: Samsung 960 Pro 1TB -- Samsung 850 Pro 2TB x4


#6 ChesterMonty

ChesterMonty
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:44 AM

Posted 09 January 2016 - 10:37 PM

Apologies for the radio silence, but I have an update: My PC is now working, but the new PSU didn't seem to fix the issue. At least EVGA's PSU seems to be of better quality than Gateway's Liteon PSU. I also got a graphics card, which fixed the issue - the Zotac 750 Ti.

 

I was unsure if a newer card like the 750 Ti would work on my old Gateway's motherboard, but it was an easy installation. Decent performance boost, too! Unfortunately, I was never able to properly test my Radeon HD 4650 in another computer, because my other, even older computer's motherboard didn't have a PCI-E slot. But with all of the problems I've been having with the 4650 (It even interfered with integrated graphics), it's probably safe to say that my old GPU was broken. I never got it to display anything ever again.

 

Small question: Is it a good idea to run Display Driver Uninstaller (DDU) to remove the last traces of AMD graphics drivers, if there are any? Before installing 750 Ti's drivers, I uninstalled the 4650 drivers through the Device Manager, then uninstalled AMD Catalyst through AMD's Catalyst Install Manager. I've been looking at DDU to remove what's left of AMD's graphics drivers, but will it also uninstall AMD chipset drivers? It wouldn't be good if that happened :unsure: 



#7 Mac29

Mac29

  • Members
  • 40 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:44 AM

Posted 11 January 2016 - 11:36 AM

I'm not familiar w/DDU but I removed same as you for a 750 and have had zero issues. I can't imagine something like that would mess w/chipset drivers. Worth researching how to use DDU though.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users