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Advice on 32 or 64 bit on Old Computer


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#1 Ranger SVO

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 11:01 AM

I hope this is the right place for this question

 

I have an old Computer, a Dell Dimension 8400 (Feb 2004). The Processor and the video card have both been replaced for a Windows 10 upgrade. 

 

This motherboard only supports up to 4GB of RAM (which is what is installed). An SSD is also installed.

 

I have just now upgraded to Windows 10 Pro 32bit. It installed fine and works well. My question is would I benefit from a Windows 10 Pro 64bit? 

 

When I check properties it states that 4GB of RAM is installed but only 3GB is usable.

 

How I want to use the computer;

I want to use it in my classroom. It needs to run two monitors (2GB ddr3 Video card is installed) and an electronic whiteboard. 

 

What would be the Pros and Cons of using Windows 10 Pro 32bit or Windows 10 Pro 64bit?



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 11:09 AM

Well, what determines whether you can use 32-bit versus 64-bit is your processor.  Do you have a 64-bit architecture?  If so then it would make sense to install 64-bit Windows.  If you don't the question is answered and you've got the version installed that is matched to your hardware.

 

I can't imagine that the upgrade process (if you did the GWX upgrade) would not determine both what version of Windows you had running and the processor you had running so that it selects the appropriate Windows 10 version for your machine.

 

If, on the other hand, you used the Media Creation tool on another machine to create your installation media you could conceivably create a mismatch.

 

If you had one of the Professional or Ultimate versions of Windows 7 or Windows 8 then the Pro version of Windows 10 is what the GWX upgrade process will get you.

 

You can easily determine what your Windows and hardware configuration is by looking in the System Properties.  I suspect you'll see 32-bit operating system and x86 architecture.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 shelf life

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 11:14 AM

Do you know if your new CPU supports 64bit instruction?


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#4 DefaultGateway

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 11:21 AM

You would only benefit from a 64-bit / x64 version, if you decide to upgrade your RAM memory. Because if your RAM is more than 4GB, you must have a 64-bit OS. The point is that your motherboard only supports up to 4GB RAM.

 

Secondly, many applications use 32-bit / x86, so at this subject, you would not benefit at all.

 

That you see 3GB RAM is normal, a part of the RAM is always reserved for the system.

Whether an OS is 32-bit or 64-bit has nothing to do with running two monitors and an electronic whiteboard, unless some sort of software requires 64-bit.

 

My advice to you is to keep using Windows 10 Pro 32-bit / x86 and do not upgrade / change to 64-bit / x64.

 



#5 Ranger SVO

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 11:48 AM

Wow, thanks for the really fast reply.

 

The original processor was replaced because it did not support NX and it did not support PAE.

 

So I replaced it, this is the properties from myDell

Attached Files


Edited by Ranger SVO, 06 December 2015 - 11:48 AM.


#6 britechguy

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 11:58 AM

I gather you installed prior to changing the processor or else did not upgrade via GWX but instead used the media creation tool.

 

This is the first instance I've seen where a machine with an x64 processor has a 32-bit version of Windows installed.  Not that this will not work, but it's certainly not the norm to install a 32-bit OS on a 64-bit architecture.  There are lots of programs that come only in 32-bit, and so far in my experience all run just fine on 64-bit systems with 64-bit OSes.

 

I'd be curious to hear the exact sequence of your hardware and OS upgrades and which method you actually used to do the Windows upgrade.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#7 Ranger SVO

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 12:22 PM

My computer had Windows 7 Pro 32 bit installed for the last 5-years. I wanted to upgrade to Windows 10 but there was NO drivers available for my VisionTek ATI Radeon HD 4350. So I replaced it with a Gigabyte GeForce GT 610. I went from 512MB to 2GB.

 

RAM was maxed out when Windows 7 was originally installed.

 

I downloaded the Windows 10 Pro file and saved it to USB drive. I downloaded the 32 bit version because that was what was installed on my computer.

 

I attempted the install Windows 10 and got the following error "You can not install Windows 10 on this PC because your Processor doesn't support NX".

 

So I went online did a little research and found a Pentium 4 660 that met all requirements for Windows 10. I replaced the Processor yesterday and Installed Windows 10 with no problem. 

 

I also noticed that this processor supported x64, the original processor did not.

 

That's what prompted me to start this thread. This is probably the last upgrade this Dell will ever get. The computer I'm using at school currently is serious overkill and I want to bring it back home and replace it with the Dell


Edited by Ranger SVO, 06 December 2015 - 12:30 PM.


#8 britechguy

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 12:27 PM

Were I you, and if you've not done any significant work on customizing the machine, I'd make a full backup then attempt to install 64-bit Windows Pro.  While you may not need/want it now, you can't actually exploit all of the capabilities of your hardware with what you've got set up now.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#9 Ranger SVO

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 12:51 PM

Were I you, and if you've not done any significant work on customizing the machine, I'd make a full backup then attempt to install 64-bit Windows Pro.  While you may not need/want it now, you can't actually exploit all of the capabilities of your hardware with what you've got set up now.

Thank you for the advice. I will give it a try and see what happens.

 

Again Thanks. 



#10 GameGuru

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 09:45 PM

Honestly you won't get much benefit (from my experience) going from 32-bit to 64-bit on this old of hardware.  I actually found on older hardware the 32-bit ran better (especially with Ubuntu).  64-bit does give you access to more RAM (if your motherboard allows it) but on a single core old Pentium 4 you won't be doing much other than Word or browsing the internet.  I say just leave it as is and enjoy it.

 

 

 

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Edited by GameGuru, 06 December 2015 - 09:53 PM.

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#11 Kilroy

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 01:11 PM

You might get access to the full 4GB of RAM by going to 64 bit.

 

You would be able to run 64 bit software, along with most 32 bit software.

 

You could always purchase a drive for about $50, or use one you have laying around, and see if there is a difference.



#12 Ranger SVO

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 07:02 PM

Well, It won't run 64 bit Windows 10. I got an error that stated "install failed because your processor doesn't support Compare Exchange 128" what ever that is. I think this is the last upgrade for this old Dell. 

 

Anyway, I put the other Hard Drive (Windows 10 Pro 32-bit) back in and it works fine. I guess I'll run it 'till it dies.

 

Again, I thank all for your insights



#13 drues1986

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 05:30 AM

First you if you have x64 bit processor then you should install window 10 64 bit and also 32 bit window only use 3 GB RAM if you want to more usable RAM then you should upgrade window 64 bit and 64 bit window have some advantage more secure .



#14 Ranger SVO

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 09:51 PM

OK, I finally figured it out. My older processor is a 64-bit processor and it can run Windows 7 x64. 

 

I'm not sure about Windows 8 or 8.1 x64

 

I know Windows 10 x86 will run on my Dell, but Windows 10 x64 will not.

 

 

To install Windows 10 64-bit OS on a 64-bit PC, the processor needs to support CMPXCHG16b, PrefetchW, and LAHF/SAHF.

 

Here is the Log from CoreInfo

 

Intel® Pentium® 4 CPU 3.60GHz
x86 Family 15 Model 4 Stepping 10, GenuineIntel
Microcode signature: 00000004
HTT       * Hyperthreading enabled
HYPERVISOR - Hypervisor is present
VMX       - Supports Intel hardware-assisted virtualization
SVM       - Supports AMD hardware-assisted virtualization
X64       * Supports 64-bit mode
 
SMX       - Supports Intel trusted execution
SKINIT     - Supports AMD SKINIT
 
NX         * Supports no-execute page protection
SMEP       - Supports Supervisor Mode Execution Prevention
SMAP       - Supports Supervisor Mode Access Prevention
PAGE1GB   - Supports 1 GB large pages
PAE       * Supports > 32-bit physical addresses
PAT       * Supports Page Attribute Table
PSE       * Supports 4 MB pages
PSE36     * Supports > 32-bit address 4 MB pages
PGE       * Supports global bit in page tables
SS         * Supports bus snooping for cache operations
VME       * Supports Virtual-8086 mode
RDWRFSGSBASE - Supports direct GS/FS base access
 
FPU       * Implements i387 floating point instructions
MMX       * Supports MMX instruction set
MMXEXT     - Implements AMD MMX extensions
3DNOW     - Supports 3DNow! instructions
3DNOWEXT   - Supports 3DNow! extension instructions
SSE       * Supports Streaming SIMD Extensions
SSE2       * Supports Streaming SIMD Extensions 2
SSE3       * Supports Streaming SIMD Extensions 3
SSSE3     - Supports Supplemental SIMD Extensions 3
SSE4a     - Supports Streaming SIMDR Extensions 4a
SSE4.1     - Supports Streaming SIMD Extensions 4.1
SSE4.2     - Supports Streaming SIMD Extensions 4.2
 
AES       - Supports AES extensions
AVX       - Supports AVX intruction extensions
FMA       - Supports FMA extensions using YMM state
MSR       * Implements RDMSR/WRMSR instructions
MTRR       * Supports Memory Type Range Registers
XSAVE     - Supports XSAVE/XRSTOR instructions
OSXSAVE   - Supports XSETBV/XGETBV instructions
RDRAND     - Supports RDRAND instruction
RDSEED     - Supports RDSEED instruction
 
CMOV       * Supports CMOVcc instruction
CLFSH     * Supports CLFLUSH instruction
CX8       * Supports compare and exchange 8-byte instructions
CX16       * Supports CMPXCHG16B instruction
BMI1       - Supports bit manipulation extensions 1
BMI2       - Supports bit manipulation extensions 2
ADX       - Supports ADCX/ADOX instructions
DCA       - Supports prefetch from memory-mapped device
F16C       - Supports half-precision instruction
FXSR       * Supports FXSAVE/FXSTOR instructions
FFXSR     - Supports optimized FXSAVE/FSRSTOR instruction
MONITOR   * Supports MONITOR and MWAIT instructions
MOVBE     - Supports MOVBE instruction
ERMSB     - Supports Enhanced REP MOVSB/STOSB
PCLMULDQ   - Supports PCLMULDQ instruction
POPCNT     - Supports POPCNT instruction
LZCNT     - Supports LZCNT instruction
SEP       * Supports fast system call instructions
LAHF-SAHF * Supports LAHF/SAHF instructions in 64-bit mode
HLE       - Supports Hardware Lock Elision instructions
RTM       - Supports Restricted Transactional Memory instructions
 
DE         * Supports I/O breakpoints including CR4.DE
DTES64     * Can write history of 64-bit branch addresses
DS         * Implements memory-resident debug buffer
DS-CPL     * Supports Debug Store feature with CPL
PCID       - Supports PCIDs and settable CR4.PCIDE
INVPCID   - Supports INVPCID instruction
PDCM       - Supports Performance Capabilities MSR
RDTSCP     - Supports RDTSCP instruction
TSC       * Supports RDTSC instruction
TSC-DEADLINE - Local APIC supports one-shot deadline timer
TSC-INVARIANT - TSC runs at constant rate
xTPR       * Supports disabling task priority messages
 
EIST       * Supports Enhanced Intel Speedstep
ACPI       * Implements MSR for power management
TM         * Implements thermal monitor circuitry
TM2       * Implements Thermal Monitor 2 control
APIC       * Implements software-accessible local APIC
x2APIC     - Supports x2APIC
 
CNXT-ID   * L1 data cache mode adaptive or BIOS
 
MCE       * Supports Machine Check, INT18 and CR4.MCE
MCA       * Implements Machine Check Architecture
PBE       * Supports use of FERR#/PBE# pin
 
PSN       - Implements 96-bit processor serial number
 
PREFETCHW - Supports PREFETCHW instruction
 
All  * are supported
All  - are NOT supported
 
PREFETCHW is not supported on My Pentium 660, everything else is supported. So 32-bit is it


#15 GameGuru

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Posted 15 December 2015 - 11:34 AM

You might be able to try a 64-Bit variant of Linux also (Ubuntu is really the easiest) and maybe that will work for you.  I love Ubuntu and run it on my second PC, I have Windows 10 on my main PC because of gaming, it's just easier to do it on real Windows then having to figure everything out with Wine in Ubuntu but for every other thing Linux is perfect!


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