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Google Chrome end of support announcement


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#1 buddy215

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 06:40 AM

SOURCE: Google Decides to End Support for Google Chrome on 32-Bit Linux OSes

 

Today, December 1, 2015, Google has announced that they will no longer provide 32-bit DEB packages of the Google Chrome web browser for select GNU/Linux operating systems.

The brief announcement was made an hour ago by Dirk Pranke on the Chromium-dev group, and it informs users of Ubuntu and Debian GNU/Linux distributions that, starting March 2016, the Google Chrome web browser will no longer be available for 32-bit hardware platforms.

Additionally, Google also says that future releases of the Google Chrome web browser will no longer be supported on the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) and Debian GNU/Linux 7 (Wheezy) OSes, urging users to update to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) and Debian GNU/Linux 8 (Jessie), respectively.

According to Mr. Pranke, the decision to end support for Google Chrome on 32-bit Linux operating system was made to provide GNU/Linux users with the best experience possible. As you might know, Google Chrome is currently distributed as DEB and RPM binary packages for various distributions.

"To provide the best experience for the most-used Linux versions, we will end support for Google Chrome on 32-bit Linux, Ubuntu Precise (12.04), and Debian 7 (wheezy) in early March, 2016," said Dirk Pranke, Technical Staff at Google. "Chrome will continue to function on these platforms but will no longer receive updates and security fixes."

Today's announcement also mentions the fact that Google will continue to support the 32-bit build configurations for those who want to build the open-source Chromium web browser on various Linux kernel-based operating systems.

 

 


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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 03:07 PM

Well that sucks luckily chromium does work pretty well and it is open source but the one thing that would be lost is the ability to play netflix natively and it would be back to using pipe light on Firefox

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#3 DeimosChaos

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 03:30 PM

Well that sucks luckily chromium does work pretty well and it is open source but the one thing that would be lost is the ability to play netflix natively and it would be back to using pipe light on Firefox

They aren't getting rid of ALL support on Linux... just the 32bit OS support. Which shouldn't be a big deal. Virtually all hardware is 64bit anyway so hardly anyone should be running with 32bit OSes anymore.


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#4 MadmanRB

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 03:31 PM

 

Well that sucks luckily chromium does work pretty well and it is open source but the one thing that would be lost is the ability to play netflix natively and it would be back to using pipe light on Firefox

They aren't getting rid of ALL support on Linux... just the 32bit OS support. Which shouldn't be a big deal. Virtually all hardware is 64bit anyway so hardly anyone should be running with 32bit OSes anymore.

 

 

People still use 32bit hardware and usually such hardware runs linux as usually they are converted XP machines


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#5 NickAu

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 03:43 PM

 

People still use 32bit hardware and usually such hardware runs linux as usually they are converted XP machines

I still have 2, 32 bit machines, and i know a few people who also have them, I hardly ever use Chrome anyway.



#6 MadmanRB

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 05:58 PM

I just dont get why they are dropping the 32bit edtion though, one can build a 32bit binary in a 64bit machine


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#7 DeimosChaos

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 06:48 PM

Well that sucks luckily chromium does work pretty well and it is open source but the one thing that would be lost is the ability to play netflix natively and it would be back to using pipe light on Firefox

They aren't getting rid of ALL support on Linux... just the 32bit OS support. Which shouldn't be a big deal. Virtually all hardware is 64bit anyway so hardly anyone should be running with 32bit OSes anymore.
 
People still use 32bit hardware and usually such hardware runs linux as usually they are converted XP machines

True. I guess they feel like those 32bit machines are so few and far between that they don't need to extend the man power on keeping it up. They do know how much it is download and how many are actively running. So my guess is there isn't much.

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#8 mremski

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 07:04 AM

Decent bare bones 64 bit systems are available for reasonably short money from places like TigerDirect and NewEgg if you want to roll your own replacement machine.


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#9 cat1092

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 04:33 AM

 

Today, December 1, 2015, Google has announced that they will no longer provide 32-bit DEB packages of the Google Chrome web browser for select GNU/Linux operating systems.

 

This now makes two browsers that has dropped 32 bit support for Linux, Google & Opera, and I'm not sure if Opera is going to support 32 bit any OS in the future. 

 

It's time to face the facts, except for the short lived netbook campaign, there hasn't been 32 bit computers sold since the release of Windows 7 in 2009, over 6 years ago. Before then most Vista computers shipped with 64 bit capability, only many chose to downgrade to XP for the same reasons why many have backed up their Windows 10 upgrades (to have proof of activation later) & reverted to Windows 7 or 8.1 to have a 'familiar' environment, or like some Vista users, the OS wouldn't run good on their computers. Ahead of it's time for some hardware. 

 

So we've had 64 bit computers for at least 10 years (I had XP Pro 64 bit on a PC purchased at a business auction), and some of us are now wondering 'why' the drop for 32 bit software? Actually many of us were expecting it in 2012, that there would be no 32 bit Windows 8 offered, and there most certainly shouldn't have been a 32 bit Windows 10 offered. 

 

I expect this action to not just affect Linux users, rather 32 bit users as a whole, most of these machines are old (from early Vista/late XP days), some are required to invoke the forcepae option for a modern version to install, and we wonder why Google & others wants to ditch 32 bit? Furthermore, I see the day coming that some 32 bit users who made the leap to Windows 10 will have to revert to their prior OS........& hope that Google is still supporting that. 

 

We're in a different age, the CPU OEM's needs to advance, possibly to 128 bit, 32 bit is holding up future progress, because of the resources needed to make 64 bit software compatible with 32 bit OS's. In reality, that sounds silly, as a 64 bit computer of any type should have all 64 bit software, not 'some' 32 bit software just to be able to communicate with 32 bit clients, this was why when Office 2010 was released, the recommended install was the 32 bit version, in order to communicate with Office 2007. That's not forward thinking, rather backwards. 

 

And that's where we stand, in a forward thinking environment. Many has said that either the next Ubuntu LTS will be the last 32 bit offering, or the current version will be the end of the line. If there's going to be a lack of software to support it, there's no need to produce another 32 bit LTS release, as more & more 32 bit software developers will stop writing software. Can I blame them for not wanting to support platforms with a rapid user declining rate? No I cannot. Software creation is expensive & resource consuming that can be redirected towards modern OS's on modern hardware, most of which are 64 bit machines, unfortunately the 128 bit CPU hasn't came forward yet, though there has been some machines with two 64 bit CPU's running in tandem, though this is not a true 128 bit CPU setup. Some has suggested that 64 bit will suffice for the next 200 years, which is not an encouraging sign, though for OEM's like AMD, it would be the breakthrough they desperately need, like the Athlon X2's in the upper mid part of the last decade. This forced Intel to step up, who were fine with how things were at the time. 

 

Maybe there will be a Chromium release that's 32 bit, only it will be more work for the end user. Plus there's other 32 bit browsers included in the Software Manager. Some, we've never heard of. others we've not. Some are simply rebranded Firefox or Chromium browsers, others are castoffs that just never made it to be known. Though this doesn't imply they're no good, it's possible that like with some other software, these aren't up to date. A try & see approach is best with these, even on Linux, we don't want to run outdated browsers.

 

These browsers gets their information about how many 32 bit machines there are online in much the same manner as how stat counts are done, or getting the information directly from the same counters. This however, isn't exactly news, anyone who has done much reading of tech articles at all should have ran across articles that's suggested 32 bit OS's are nosediving faster than XP. Linux distro maintainers also keeps count of which OS's are downloaded the most, they know what's moving in larger numbers when getting from official sources.

 

Note that Google has also dropped support beginning in April for both XP & Windows Vista, the latter which still is in official support for a year, so it's not just Linux being targeted. It wouldn't surprise me at some point not far away for them to drop support for all 32 bit OS's. Security is another factor, along with the OS, 64 bit browsers are more secure than 32 bit ones, which is likely why Linux OS's that are 64 bit are running 64 bit browsers. Windows has been slower to adapt, yet the change may be imposed on them, Google is a very large corporation with deep pockets, if anyone can force Microsoft to retire 32 bit OS's right now, it's Google. All they have to do is pull the plug and the death of 32 bit Windows is certain.

 

Note that 32 bit Windows OS's are in much lower numbers than 64 bit also, and it was that OS brand which introduced many of of to 64 bit OS's, with XP Pro 64 bit on April 25, 2005, four months short of 11 years ago. 

 

Honestly, I don't understand the surprise, had it not been for the 3 year extension that XP received, 32 bit computing would likely have been a dead horse years ago. It's been 6 years ago since I last seen Topics elsewhere where the content was 'should I run a 32 or 64 bit OS', a common issue for Windows 7 adopters, because for whatever reason, they feared the 64 bit OS, while at the same time, that's all that was being distributed, other than netbooks, later given to those who purchased 2 year data plans from cellular providers, a $200 netbook selling for $2,400 plus taxes, fees & surcharges, though these are no longer offered. Even today's budget smartphones are 64 bit powered, as are many low cost tablets of varying brands. 

 

It's time to wake up & smell the coffee, we're in a high speed data world, and 32 bit computing isn't in the roadmap for the future. Many who still has 32 bit computers knows they have at least until 2019 with Ubuntu 14.04 & it's derivatives, the future of 16.04 is still up for grabs, no one is saying anything. Yet one thing for sure, we'll soon know, as there will be testing releases, alpha, beta & release candidates of the next LTS. That may give us a hint of future plans. 

 

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#10 DeimosChaos

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Posted 08 December 2015 - 12:45 PM

Nicely thought out Cat.

 

Going forward there is no need for 32bit anything since all hardware *should* be 64bit anyway. So eventually all the 32bit stuff will die out anyway. Makes sense that companies are starting to no longer support 32. Frees up money for other projects and improving their current 64bit software.


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#11 cat1092

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 05:58 AM

Too, by 2019 many of these 32 bit machines will be in hardware heaven, with components recycled to make modern 64 bit computers. 

 

Even the few Linux OEM's are only distributing 64 bit machines, really there's no reason why not, AFAIK there's been no 32 bit CPU's released by Intel or AMD for years. It'll be interesting to see if there's a 32 bit build on Ubuntu 16.04, which may define the end of any support for these older computers for early 2019, other than some Puppy builds, I don't see much left to offer. Still, 3 years & 3 months is lots of time to prepare, there's many new(er) 64 bit computers of all types to choose from, beginning at $89 for Microsoft certified refurbished PC's. And new ones starting at $248 at one's nearest Walmart that will run rings around former 'high performance' models of a decade ago. 

 

That's plenty of time to come up with a plan of action, $150 can get a really nice refurbished 64 bit business PC that will run the latest 64 bit Linux releases, now & a few more releases down the road. :thumbup2:

 

And will pay for themselves with the energy saved. All of that heat coming from old machines is wasted energy that would power a new(er) computer. 

 

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#12 SuperSapien64

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Posted 12 December 2015 - 03:35 PM

Maybe Maxthon (Chrome/Chromium based) will continue to support Linux 32-bit. http://www.maxthon.com/



#13 cat1092

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Posted 13 December 2015 - 02:20 AM

Great idea there, SuperSapien64! :thumbup2:

 

I had ran the Maxthon browser on Windows some years back, looks far more feature filled than then, plus it's a cloud browser, hopefully would give faster response times. 

 

Oh no, just installed it, it's just another Chrome wannabe, as soon as I opened it, the browser installed a couple of extensions I have on Google Chrome. This is not close to the original Maxthon, in fact when I last used it, was closer to IE than any browser that I had used. What I don't understand is why doesn't one come up with an original browser, rather than placing a customized skin on Chromium. Browser innovation has gone the way of the dogs, not even the original Opera owners, whom also had an original before the buyout, wants to start fresh again, though the talent is there, are also using a customized Chromium to develop Vivaldi. 

 

https://vivaldi.com/

 

Here's their stance on keeping 32 bit available for Linux. :thumbup2:

 

https://vivaldi.net/forum/vivaldi-browser-for-linux/7440-32-bit

 

Still, hopefully Maxthon (& Vivaldi) will stay available for the remaining 32 bit users, as long as there's reasonable demand for the browsers, though if Chromium drops 32 bit support, game over. I was taking a peek in the Software Manager, nothing promising there, some of these outdated packages needs to be cleaned up. We know that Opera isn't going to support Linux 32 bit, and if so, will be insecure, yet the old 12.16 package is still there. 

 

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#14 MalwareMutilator

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 05:55 PM

What really disappoints me about this is that I just finished installing Mint 17.2 (32-bit) on my dual-boot XP setup, when my machine is perfectly capable of running 64bit. Indeed, I installed Mate 17.3 (64-bit) on a flash drive to try it out, and it runs beautifully.

 

My first thought was that I would just boot of my old Windows XP disk and run fixmbr from the recovery console, format the Linux partition, and install 17.3 (64-bit) as I did with 17.2 (32-bit). But then, as I remember, fixmbr doesn't work on SATA drives. I haven't done that for years but I believe that is true.

 

Anyway, that's a can of worms I don't want to open until after the holidays. I do have a complete Macrium image of my system both before, and after, the dual-boot setup, so given the worst case, I could just restore the pre-dual-boot image and start again.

 

It makes no sense to me that Google would stop 32-bit support.  :huh:



#15 MadmanRB

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 05:57 PM

It really doesnt, after all most use linux on older computers.


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